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Old
07-20-2009, 03:30 PM
  #51
Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stick9 View Post
All true and great stuff. You have to keep in mind, there are a good portion of players that simply don't have the time to work on their game away from the rink and probably only get ice time once....maybe twice a week. So while correct form and technique will help, it's not always an option.

I know all the mechanics of it and I still choose to use an open face blade to help roof pucks. Even if I had insane technique I'd opt for an open face blade just that added boost.

To the OP - Try a Warrior Draper.
Well that is true ... I do have the good fortune to have a large backyard and a goal cage that I shoot at for practice. At my age of 41 I will have to start working harder at not losing my shot by practicing more to keep in hockey shape and not get "too old". Switching to a composite from wood was a nice boost in easier release and better shooting as I started to lose a little zip a couple of years ago from getting older.

The other thing I consider in a stick blade is a happy medium .... that means finding a blade that allows you to do everything you want to do UNIVERSALLY.

I can shoot more accurately with a big wicked mid curve for slapshots, also wristshots are "easier" BUT I lose some on backhand passing and backhand shots so I use a blade somewhere in the middle of a big curve and more straight. i play the opposite wing very often and NEED a good backhand.

It comes down to what kind of player one is I guess .... if a guy is just going to occupy the top of the crease and just roof pucks and be useless everywhere else like a John Leclair who used a wicked pitching wedge then so be it.

Most men's leagues aren't that specific where one would need a a trick stick as I call them.

The point however is that if one can shoot and has good mechanics (technique) they can shoot with a washcloth tied to a broom handle.

Your point is taekn however ... if a guy is not interested in improving and just wants to weekend warrior on a pickup team i suppose it isn't my business to tell him he is doing it wrong by finding a cheat stick.

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Old
07-21-2009, 03:46 AM
  #52
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As far as choosing the right curve, I think the best way is try different curves until you find one that fits your natural game. Just try different curves shooting from your favored area(s) until you find the best one.

Then, using that curve, try hitting certain parts of the net from areas outside of your comfort zone, so you're also developing the technique. While I know the curve definitely has a significant effect, I can't downplay technique, either.

Hope that helps...

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07-21-2009, 09:11 PM
  #53
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Originally Posted by stafuccijr View Post
Hockeyfan68 - I appreciate you trying to help but you really are just giving me a headache reading your posts. bleedgreen thank you for your recommendations. No one needs to worry about my mechanics, im not looking to be Gretzky, im simply a dangler that needs some assistance roofing my shots from up close. Sometimes I can get it, sometimes I cant. Thank you all for ur help! good day!
find a curve you like. its not golf. you need one for all your shots and passes. if you get one that helps you roof the puck it may mess up your other shots. just set up a bunch of pucks and shoot in close. you will get it.

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07-21-2009, 09:58 PM
  #54
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i like the Easton Forseburg or the CCM Thornton.

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07-22-2009, 02:13 AM
  #55
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Originally Posted by ILflyersfan View Post
i like the Easton Forseburg or the CCM Thornton.
Those are quite different curves...

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Old
07-22-2009, 02:34 AM
  #56
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Originally Posted by ILflyersfan View Post
i like the Easton Forseburg or the CCM Thornton.
If you are trying to make it easier to lift the puck, wouldn't you use something with an open face ala the Sakic as opposed to the closed face Forsberg?

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07-22-2009, 06:01 PM
  #57
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Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
Your point is taekn however ... if a guy is not interested in improving and just wants to weekend warrior on a pickup team i suppose it isn't my business to tell him he is doing it wrong by finding a cheat stick.
I wouldn't say he's not interested in improving, maybe he just doesn't have the time to put into it. Guys with families and such can be pretty busy leaving little time to shoot pucks in the backyard even if the desire to do so is there. I wouldn't necessarily call an open face blade a cheat stick. Just a tool to help do a specific job easier.

I'm 39 and I am done working on stuff away from the rink. I play for fun and love of the game. There's no scouts in stands. Time used working on a shooting technique for pick up and rec league hockey would be better used working around the house.

Now, if I couldn't get the desired results than I would probably make the time.

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Old
07-22-2009, 08:08 PM
  #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bammers View Post
If you are trying to make it easier to lift the puck, wouldn't you use something with an open face ala the Sakic as opposed to the closed face Forsberg?

Maybe he is the same as I am and can do it easily with a blade similar to what he listed.

I prefer the Recchi / Datsyuk but am currently using an Easton Heatley pattern which differs from most other Heatley patterns (looks like a Recchi), and a P88 Lindros / Iginla by Harrow.

I also use an RBK Iginla which is more like a Recchi than the P88 Lindros / Iginla. I wish these companies would just putting NHL names on their blades because they are all different from one another.

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Old
07-23-2009, 12:26 AM
  #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockeyfan68 View Post
Maybe he is the same as I am and can do it easily with a blade similar to what he listed.

I prefer the Recchi / Datsyuk but am currently using an Easton Heatley pattern which differs from most other Heatley patterns (looks like a Recchi), and a P88 Lindros / Iginla by Harrow.

I also use an RBK Iginla which is more like a Recchi than the P88 Lindros / Iginla. I wish these companies would just putting NHL names on their blades because they are all different from one another.
Geeez this isn't a competition you know....

I also use the Forsberg (Easton) because I prefer a more closed face, because you get the best of both worlds. (I like it because I can do all the shots I need and pass quite well) (It is not a crutch though)

I was suggesting that if he wanted to make it the EASIEST to lift the puck, something with a really open face would be more effective.

But yeah, Companies should just use a number system or something to catalogue their curves. The names changing all the time is getting a bit annoying.

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Old
07-23-2009, 12:45 AM
  #60
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ILflyersfan View Post
i like the Easton Forseburg or the CCM Thornton.
Even though those don't help you lift the puck, I agree. Straight blades are the best for playmakers. I even find Thorntons too curved, gotta back that up to a Modano

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Old
04-23-2010, 10:47 PM
  #61
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Originally Posted by AIREAYE View Post
i have a P92, before it i couldn't get the puck high either, but i think the curve definately helps...ona side note, Draper isn't really of a sniper, more of a checker, yet he has a sniper's curve, why is that?
Player's names on a blade are for promotional and advertising purposes. Just because the guy's name is on the blade doesn't mean he uses the curve on that blade.

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Old
04-23-2010, 11:18 PM
  #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dats13forlife View Post
Player's names on a blade are for promotional and advertising purposes. Just because the guy's name is on the blade doesn't mean he uses the curve on that blade.
Whao, what a stupid post by me, I def know better...

Wouldnt it make more sense for Warrior to put a sniper to a sniper's curve? I think thats what I meant

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Old
04-24-2010, 07:36 AM
  #63
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not to stir the pot, but I would ask if technique is less important than curve, how do you suppose a guy goes up stairs on their backhand?

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Old
04-24-2010, 08:38 AM
  #64
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Originally Posted by JSTAFF View Post
Ok...I would call my style being a dangler, I have alot of speed, have great hands, and RARELY take slap shots. My main problem is getting the puck up high when im in close to the net, one timers up close, etc. Granted I've played 8 years of outdoor roller with a ball, my technique with a puck might just not be there to get my shots up high. I'm used to just a flick of my wrist up close will put the ball in the top shelf. I've been playing with a puck now for 2 years and I still have problems up close getting my shot to go top shelf. Should I be using a different curve to help aid in my lack of technique? If so, what is my best option? Thanks
I've played both ice and roller for years and helped several friends who were straight roller players learn how to shoot the puck when they transitioned to ice.

Most of them had trouble lifting the puck in close, so you aren't alone in having that problem.

When you are in close, to lift the puck, you want to shoot off the toe of your blade instantly. Don't start your shot from mid heel, start with the toe of the blade and snap your bottom wrist up as quickly as possible.

Your bottom hand should be facing fingers up after your release to get the best elevation and snap.

It helps to do a little toe drag first and then snap it like I explained above. Just keep practicing and it will come to you. It really isn't that difficult.

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04-24-2010, 10:10 AM
  #65
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If you're inside ten feet, basically in the crease, you need to learn the flip shot. If you're trying to roll heel to toe, you're overdoing it at that distance.

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Old
04-25-2010, 12:34 PM
  #66
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Originally Posted by rinkrat22 View Post
not to stir the pot, but I would ask if technique is less important than curve, how do you suppose a guy goes up stairs on their backhand?
Really? Technique IS how you go top-shelf on the backhand. I've been using a P92 for years. It's a big open curve that lends itself to going upstairs with ease on a wrist shot. Not a very good curve for backhand passing/shooting, but I go roof with backhands all day long because I know how to shoot one. It's entirely technique and has nothing to do with the curve. Shooting is 95% technique and than you get 5% fine tuning by finding the perfect curve for your game. Anyone who blames a curve for their poor shot (after having a chance to adjust to the curve - sure, changing curves can throw you off for a minute) hasn't mastered that shot. Anyone who says "man, I got this new stick but the curve sucks for wristers; I can't go top shelf" just has a crappy wrister. A good hockey player can go top shelf, repeatedly, with a straight flat curve.

Also, I'm sorry OP, but I have to laugh when you keep calling yourself a "dangler" yet you can't roof a puck from in close. People labeling themselves with NHL 2010 pedigrees are too funny. If you haven't yet gotten good enough that you can roof a puck from the top of the crease consistently than you should worry less about what "style" of player you are and more about practicing the skills that will PREVENT you from pigeon-holing yourself as such a specific type of player. Practice, is the only way you will ever finish consistently when you dangle your way to the front of the net and no curve will change that. Learn to roof the puck, like many have already said, by shooting from all around the top of the crease. Learn to take a better slap shot and fire a one timer.

Don't be in a rush to say "I don't need a slap shot, I'm a dangler". I take it you're a young guy and you say you've only been playing ice hockey for 2 years. You should hone all your skills and not be in a hurry to label yourself just because everyone is labeled as something in the video games. You're playing rec league (most likely); you shouldn't have a specialty - you should be able to do a little of everything. There are curves out there that can act as a crutch for a specific type of shot, but as HF68 mentioned, you'll be better off with a "happy medium" curve that will allow you to do everything efficiently, and should model your game similarly and not look for "easy answers" when you find a skill you haven't polished. Otherwise you'll never improve and you'll be only ever be a "dangler" skating around with a big hook on your stick who can't contribute from anywhere else on the ice. I don't mean to come off as being harsh or judgmental but I played 4 years of NCAA hockey and have known a lot of guys who have been drafted or gone to Europe to play professionally. I am only telling you this because if you want to be the best hockey player you can be (and you obviously do, or you wouldn't be here asking how to roof pucks and improve that skill) than you should understand that all skills are equally important and you have to learn them all through practice, not acquire them by changing your skates or buying a new stick.


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04-25-2010, 01:11 PM
  #67
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I classify myself as a"scrub" since I have been p;laying for roughly 5 months all of which are pickup open hockey games "no stick time". I played street hockey since I was 6ish with my friends who all played ice hockey so I learned to do anything BUT skate

I use a Reebok 5k shaft with currently a Sherwood wood Crosby blade which comes with a slight curve and I can top shelf from inside/outside the crease with ease, as long as I can stay balanced skating. I agree with EVERYONE on here that says its technique because I also used a Coffey curve before this and it made no difference except that my wristers would go a little higher but using the composite 5k which I cut shorter and the diff lie all made my shot better, not the curve. I stil can't rasie my backhanders or take good slapshots because I need to practice them. I know the OP just wants to know a good curve to enhance his yop shelf shots which I understand but I am more writing to those, if any, that say a curve makes the shot. Its the shooter and technique!

PS- Before hockey, I shot olympic rifle on the state level using a beat up old rifle and I compete against people using $4000 equipment, I beat em all due to technique

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Old
04-25-2010, 04:16 PM
  #68
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Originally Posted by Zetterqvist24 View Post
Really? Technique IS how you go top-shelf on the backhand. I've been using a P92 for years. It's a big open curve that lends itself to going upstairs with ease on a wrist shot. Not a very good curve for backhand passing/shooting, but I go roof with backhands all day long because I know how to shoot one. It's entirely technique and has nothing to do with the curve. Shooting is 95% technique and than you get 5% fine tuning by finding the perfect curve for your game. Anyone who blames a curve for their poor shot (after having a chance to adjust to the curve - sure, changing curves can throw you off for a minute) hasn't mastered that shot. Anyone who says "man, I got this new stick but the curve sucks for wristers; I can't go top shelf" just has a crappy wrister. A good hockey player can go top shelf, repeatedly, with a straight flat curve.

Also, I'm sorry OP, but I have to laugh when you keep calling yourself a "dangler" yet you can't roof a puck from in close. People labeling themselves with NHL 2010 pedigrees are too funny. If you haven't yet gotten good enough that you can roof a puck from the top of the crease consistently than you should worry less about what "style" of player you are and more about practicing the skills that will PREVENT you from pigeon-holing yourself as such a specific type of player. Practice, is the only way you will ever finish consistently when you dangle your way to the front of the net and no curve will change that. Learn to roof the puck, like many have already said, by shooting from all around the top of the crease. Learn to take a better slap shot and fire a one timer.

Don't be in a rush to say "I don't need a slap shot, I'm a dangler". I take it you're a young guy and you say you've only been playing ice hockey for 2 years. You should hone all your skills and not be in a hurry to label yourself just because everyone is labeled as something in the video games. You're playing rec league (most likely); you shouldn't have a specialty - you should be able to do a little of everything. There are curves out there that can act as a crutch for a specific type of shot, but as HF68 mentioned, you'll be better off with a "happy medium" curve that will allow you to do everything efficiently, and should model your game similarly and not look for "easy answers" when you find a skill you haven't polished. Otherwise you'll never improve and you'll be only ever be a "dangler" skating around with a big hook on your stick who can't contribute from anywhere else on the ice. I don't mean to come off as being harsh or judgmental but I played 4 years of NCAA hockey and have known a lot of guys who have been drafted or gone to Europe to play professionally. I am only telling you this because if you want to be the best hockey player you can be (and you obviously do, or you wouldn't be here asking how to roof pucks and improve that skill) than you should understand that all skills are equally important and you have to learn them all through practice, not acquire them by changing your skates or buying a new stick.
I'm sorry I was being sarcastic. ... What I was saying is technique is way more important. sorry for the misunderstanding

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04-26-2010, 06:09 AM
  #69
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Originally Posted by Zetterqvist24 View Post
Really? Technique IS how you go top-shelf on the backhand.
I use a 3/4 curve and still roof it on the backhand, because I know the technique for doing it. It took hours of practice and doing it over and over again until I was sick of it... then when i was sick of it I did it over and over and over and over...

I can pick up a stick with any type of curve and shoot exactly the same both forehand and backhand.... because I practiced my shooting fundamentals over and over and over...

I only care about the curve on my stick for stickhandling, period.

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04-26-2010, 05:47 PM
  #70
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For anybody looking for a retail toe curve, Kynetyk is coming out with an Ovechkin/Zherdev clone.



Kynetyk is calling it an Ovechkin clone, but I always thought the Ovie blade was more open. I'll leave it up to TBL to label it.

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04-26-2010, 06:10 PM
  #71
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These threads always bring out the guys who "know how to shoot" and talk down to everyone else. It does get old rather than just answering a question.

Some of you have had the luxury of playing since you were young or playing consistently year after year, or had parents who had the means to let you play year after year or set up rinks or shooting nets in your backyards etc and had the ability to practice your shots and make them right.

Some folks get into the game as adults, some never were able to play as kids or did so sparingly due to funds. Some now have families or responsibilities that do not let them have shooting nets in their backyards or their communities. Many play in beer leagues that do not have practices or the time on ice to work on their shots.

So for those people, maybe they just want a little bit of an advantage. Maybe they have all the technique down, but arent the "pros" that some of you are and when pressured to get a shot of quick, need a little assistance when technique isnt first on their minds.

Why cant this site just give a straight answer to these kinds of things? Why do we need to hear about how someone practiced shooting till they had blisters and now can roof a puck from their own goal line with a 40 year old wood stick with a straight blade? None of us care how good you are. Someone just wants to know if there is a curve out there that will give a little advantage when in tight roofing the puck. Lets answer that question.

No one said he couldnt do it, he said he wanted HELP in doing it. Answer the question, if you want to give some advice on how to improve his technique, thats cool. But dont sit here telling us how good you are and how he shouldnt be looking for a curve and that he needs to go shoot 500 pucks a day at the goal in his backyard that he doesnt own.

Answer his question or let it go. We get it, some of you are awesome and have put hundreds of thousands of hours perfecting your game, great. Some here just enjoy the game, will never be your level and want every single equipment advantage they can get to HELP with whatever it is they might lack.

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04-26-2010, 06:42 PM
  #72
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These threads always bring out the guys who "know how to shoot" and talk down to everyone else. It does get old rather than just answering a question....
Great response to these kinds of threads

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04-26-2010, 09:40 PM
  #73
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Great response to these kinds of threads
But, but but my slapshot is sooooooooooooo HARD and its probably 200 mph and I want all of you to know how hard it is and tell all of you guys I don't know all about it even though no one cares.

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04-26-2010, 10:36 PM
  #74
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Roofing it in close is just practice, man. Dave Andreychuk swore by doing this, it works. The real problem with using a total wide open curve is just that it's too damned hard to keep the puck down. I've found I succeed more shooting too low than too high.

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04-27-2010, 08:40 AM
  #75
Mr Jiggyfly
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Originally Posted by jsykes View Post
These threads always bring out the guys who "know how to shoot" and talk down to everyone else. It does get old rather than just answering a question.

Some of you have had the luxury of playing since you were young or playing consistently year after year, or had parents who had the means to let you play year after year or set up rinks or shooting nets in your backyards etc and had the ability to practice your shots and make them right.
This rant is a little lame to be honest. Me and several others did answer his question... then several people got into an argument about curve vs. technique.

Also, not everyone who plays hockey grew up with a silver spoon in their mouth and had things handed to them. I delivered newspapers as a kid so I could buy all of my gear and used hand me downs from my uncles and older friends, then worked two jobs as a teen to afford my equipment. My parents never bought me one piece of hockey equipment except a stick when I was 10...

I also learned to make my own backdoor rink and did it all by myself. So don't pre-judge people on this forum bro...

Now if people don't like to hear that a piece of equipment isn't going to make you a better player - that is their own fault. The only way to become a good shooter is to practice the proper technique over and over and over... the only way to become a better skater is to practice proper technique over and over and over...


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