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How long will it usually take to develop a good shot?

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Old
04-25-2010, 10:39 PM
  #1
Ducksgo*
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How long will it usually take to develop a good shot?

Just got into hockey a couple weeks ago, bought all my equipment and enrolled in our local hockey 101 league.

I can do decent wristers and decent snaps on concrete but when carrying it over the ice is a WHOLE new story! It seems that I can't grip the puck as well compared to concrete and my stick won't bend on the ice to get that nice flex. Can any of you suggest some new mechanics or is it all trial and error?

Also to add, I am right handed so which foot should I be kicking out when I am rolling my wrists? I have seen most people kick out their right while shooting right and some kicking out their left while shooting right, this is driving me nuts! =/

Thanks all!

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04-25-2010, 10:52 PM
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Well, I can tell you that skating alot and improving your balance on skates will help.

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04-25-2010, 10:58 PM
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Ani simov mal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lario Melieux View Post
Well, I can tell you that skating alot and improving your balance on skates will help.
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04-25-2010, 11:20 PM
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SERE 24
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Originally Posted by Lario Melieux View Post
Well, I can tell you that skating alot and improving your balance on skates will help.
This. The "kicking out" the foot just means which foot the player was shooting off of; when you become a completely fluent skater you will be able to shoot off of either foot. I would suggest, for your wrister at least, starting with the puck further back and "pushing" it a few inches before starting to snap your wrists and going through your shooting mechanics. All I mean by this is dragging the puck forward a little, with the puck in the proper position to start a shot, before actually starting to shoot. This should help with that feeling of "grip" that your mentioning, just a little bit. Overall though it's just practicing and becoming completely comfortable on the ice.

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04-25-2010, 11:36 PM
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Most people learn by transferring their weight onto the leg furthest from their stick (your left) and lifting the leg closest

This is the most powerful type of wrist shot, compared to transferring the weight onto the leg closest to your stick.

I have tested it on a radar gun and there is about 5MPH difference in speed for me.

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04-26-2010, 01:28 AM
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I've been skating since September. I've learned that the more comfortable you are on skates, the better you are at everything. If you can't shift your weight from one leg to the other without really thinking about it, your shot won't be all that great.

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04-26-2010, 09:32 AM
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Stage 1 is shooting on skates well period, I think this takes around 6 months for beginners to become accustomed to.

Stage 2 is shooting in motion (coasting), this takes a while, say 1-2 years, to become truly proficient at.

Stage 3 is shooting at TOP speed, in stride, and is very hard for everybody not named Ovechkin or Stamkos. This is one thing I most wish I could do

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04-26-2010, 09:56 AM
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Took me about two years to get a decent shot. I did already know how to skate though.

I'd agree balance and strength on skates is key to shooting on ice...but wouldn't discount shooting off ice as well. You build up strength in your wrists, arms, core, etc.

Also, check out the Bobby Hull Jr shooting DVD...really, really excellent.

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04-26-2010, 10:10 AM
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Something that doesn't get brought up is that you have to realize everyone shoots differently. Yea there is the same basic fundamentals but you shouldn't really try and shoot like a particular player because it's not going to happen. You have to learn your own style that is comfortable and natural to you don't just try and shoot like kovalchuk, I've tried, it's frustating

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04-26-2010, 11:10 AM
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If you shot 500 pucks every week in your backyard for the next four months, you'd probably improve your shot significantly.

The skills you learn there will take some time to transfer onto the ice, but once you get by the adjustment period (30 mins to an hour) you'll be launching lasers.

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04-26-2010, 11:14 AM
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it's taken me 2years of playing hockey every week to get my shot to a decent level for my skill level... on top of that, shooting 100-200 pucks a night really helps too

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04-26-2010, 05:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducksgo View Post
I can do decent wristers and decent snaps on concrete but when carrying it over the ice is a WHOLE new story!
There are a number of reasons you shouldn't shoot on concrete. More than the high friction coefficient...it tears your stick up!

Do yourself a favor and buy yourself a shooting pad. It is a small piece of synthetic (plastic) ice and will help you a lot.

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04-26-2010, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dabeechman View Post
There are a number of reasons you shouldn't shoot on concrete. More than the high friction coefficient...it tears your stick up!

Do yourself a favor and buy yourself a shooting pad. It is a small piece of synthetic (plastic) ice and will help you a lot.
Thanks for the idea dab! everyones info has helped me with some good insight

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04-26-2010, 06:52 PM
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raygunpk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnar Stahl 30 View Post
Something that doesn't get brought up is that you have to realize everyone shoots differently. Yea there is the same basic fundamentals but you shouldn't really try and shoot like a particular player because it's not going to happen. You have to learn your own style that is comfortable and natural to you don't just try and shoot like kovalchuk, I've tried, it's frustating
this is true, i always watch youtube vids and try to shoot like them, it just doesn't work. i wish i could skate full speed like sakic then rip one top corner without the goalie even reacting, but i just flub those shots 99% of the time.

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04-26-2010, 07:09 PM
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Originally Posted by raygunpk View Post
this is true, i always watch youtube vids and try to shoot like them, it just doesn't work. i wish i could skate full speed like sakic then rip one top corner without the goalie even reacting, but i just flub those shots 99% of the time.
That really is the hardest part. Buddy of mine who played major junior commented to me that's one of the things almost no non-pro players can do. Full speed shooting is always going to be hard for us mere mortals.

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04-26-2010, 09:15 PM
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How long it will take depends upon your talent and how much time you spend practicing. There is no set timeframe.

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04-26-2010, 09:23 PM
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Originally Posted by GoBucky View Post
How long it will take depends upon your talent and how much time you spend practicing. There is no set timeframe.
This. I've seen a big improvement in my shot just from shooting pucks everyday and making sure to work on my technique constantly. In no means am I saying I'm even good yet, but as a beginner you can see quick and good gains from constant practice and instruction.

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04-27-2010, 11:16 AM
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As a noob skater who just became fully mobile, I can say shooting is the last of your worries.

Concentrate on skating, stickhandling, and passing. If you can't skate, you can't play. If you can't stickhandle, you won't hold the puck. If you can't pass, you'll turn it over.

The play ends with a shot. Unless it's a rebound, but still. Snipers are considered play-enders.

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04-27-2010, 11:57 AM
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It is a lot of fun getting better every time you hit the ice. Every little bit helps. Stickhandle with a ball, shoot in the backyard, do balance exercises, put it together on the skates, etc.

It's frustrating after a few years and you plateau though :p

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04-27-2010, 02:05 PM
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If you can practice passing on ice or simulated ice, focus on that more than shooting as a beginner. Your teammates will appreciate it a lot.

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