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Beginners and high-end sticks

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05-06-2010, 06:15 PM
  #1
macgyverthatshiz
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Beginners and high-end sticks

I am not trying to come off like a d-bag, but I was just curious why so many beginner players always want to get $200+ sticks. I am a beginner myself, started out with a $35.00 Easton wood stick, then progressed to a Warrior Bentley composite for $70.00, which I am currently using, seems like a really good stick for the cash. My advice to beginners, buy a cheapo stick to find your shooting style, especially slap shots, as you WILL break sticks learning.

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05-06-2010, 06:21 PM
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Crosbyfan
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Agree. Put the money in skates and icetime.

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05-06-2010, 06:27 PM
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doobie604
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i doubt any beginner can break a stick by shooting. if you got the money got for it since eventually you will buy highend sticks anyways. and if you look hard enough, you can find cheap prostock or used top of the line stick for under 100bux. however i do think beginner should go with 2 piece rather than 1. you can try different curves and cheaper to replace a blade when it goes soft.

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05-06-2010, 06:41 PM
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Heat McManus
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They're for two types of people:

1. Those who can afford it

2. Those who need it.

They're nice to have, but it's not going to turn you into Ovechkin. A stick with the correct flex, lie, and comfortable curve cut to a reasonable length is going to the the most important thing.

Also, wood worked for the first century, there's no reason you can't play with it now.

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05-06-2010, 07:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macgyverthatshiz View Post
I am not trying to come off like a d-bag, but I was just curious why so many beginner players always want to get $200+ sticks. I am a beginner myself, started out with a $35.00 Easton wood stick, then progressed to a Warrior Bentley composite for $70.00, which I am currently using, seems like a really good stick for the cash. My advice to beginners, buy a cheapo stick to find your shooting style, especially slap shots, as you WILL break sticks learning.
Exactly!, I'm a beginner and I got a TPS Response two piece stick that is 59$ and a 30$ blade which is a total of 80$. I have no reason to buy an expensive stick for a few grams lighter when I can use the extra 150$ for two months worth of ice time. Why buy an expensive stick when you can't do ***** with it?

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05-06-2010, 07:57 PM
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doobie604
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because you can get a top of the line stick for $100 bux (pro stock). it's not all about the weight, it's all about the balance and puck feel. sure you spend 80 bux on a stick that will do the job but like most people you will get better and will want a better stick thinking it will improve the shot. so instead of spending 100-200 on a top of the line stick you spend 100-200 + 80. oh and once you use a better stick, its really hard to go back to the old one.

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05-06-2010, 08:32 PM
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noobman
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Look like a pro, feel like a pro.

The most I'd ever spend on a hockey stick now is about $80. I had an S17 for a while and I loved it (stick was light, and my shot was great) but it eventually broke. Now I just stick to the S5 and I'm happy with it. It's a little heavier, and slightly less responsive (puck feel) but it's a good stick at a good price.

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05-06-2010, 09:05 PM
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Hrad
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If you can't justify spending $200 on a stick, but still want that top of the line stick, then go one of these two routes:

1) Pro Stock - Around $100, always top of the line. You may not know EXACTLY what it is, but if a pro uses it, it's something good.

2) Last year's top of the line, on clearance - A good choice, you can get these for around $100 as well, it doesn't get better than this.
Vapor XXXXs, S17s, etc. for cheap.

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05-07-2010, 01:29 AM
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I started off with a wood easton. Broke it.

Then a Bentley. Not bad, but was heavy and had no flex.

So I moved up to a Hitman. A good stick for the money, but still too stiff. I got used to the curve, and liked the curve, but wanted more flexed stick.

Then, after getting a job FINALLY after over a year of searching, I rewarded myself with a Warrior Dolomite DD. Not only do I love this stick, the little extra flex is all I needed to finally lift my shots/slap shots.

Now, I impulse bought an INT AK27. I had to cut down all the others 3 inches to fit my height, so i finally picked up this bad boy (on sale, and with a discount) with 70 flex. I have yet to use it, it also has a different curve. I'm thinking this stick will definitely help improve my stick handling/shooting.

Overall, I don't see the point in starting off low. I started out, never skating before, dropping $200 on my X30s. And it was worth it. The way I see it, start off strong. Why spend 50 bucks on a beginner stick, only to want a $100 dollar stick 2 weeks later?

I wish I did more stick research, as I now have 3 sticks with the same curve, and one intermediate with a different curve. In reality, the AK27 is going to be my new main stick. I don't need to cut it- it came perfect length. The flex seems good, but then again I haven't tried it. I may ask for another AK27 with a draper curve for my bday.

But at the end of the day, I love all my sticks. I love collecting them, and I love the Warrior company. I have them laying horizontal on clips on my wall, its a beautiful display. I use all my sticks as well. My bentley I use to toy around with outside, my Hitman I use during freeskate, and my dolomite i use when im on ice shot practicing.

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05-07-2010, 03:24 AM
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MJAYK
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Id say for a beginner, just find a stick that feels good for you and is whippy enough. You see plenty of guys that are obviously new to the sport going around at the rink shooting poor wristshots with sticks that are obviously too stiff for them. They will develop bad habits technique wise right off the bat if they wont start utilizing the flex of the stick on the shot. That being said, you dont have to pay 200$ for a stick to do this for you.

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05-07-2010, 04:01 AM
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dabeechman
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Buy it once and be happy. Being cheap usually costs you in the long run.

My personal experience with just about everything in life.

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05-07-2010, 04:43 AM
  #12
ju87
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if you can afford it, why not ?

the most important factors to me are lie and flex. i had to go thru a lot of sticks / blades in the trial & error process.

in that regard, i can see the sense in buying cheap sticks until you find the setup that you like. after that point, regardless of skill level, get whatever stick you want and can afford.

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05-07-2010, 05:37 AM
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raygunpk
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buy used on craigslist

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05-07-2010, 07:26 AM
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ryangib
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buy sticks not drugs.

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05-07-2010, 08:29 AM
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jagged
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If they can afford it... then why not?

Why does it matter to you what the other player is holding between their hands?

High end sticks are often lighter, better quality, more durable, and etc.

Most beginners I believe would rather just spend their money on one good stick and learn to use it. They're a beginner so any curve they use will be new to them anyhow. What's wrong with getting something good off the bat?

And to put it in perspective, a high end 2 piece combo (One95 shaft and blade) would be had for $120 CAD.

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05-07-2010, 08:34 AM
  #16
Skraut
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heat McManus View Post
They're for two types of people:

1. Those who can afford it

2. Those who need it.
3. Those who are 6'4" and try to buy their first stick in the offseason. Went to 8 different stores between the LHS, the PIAS, Dicks, etc. Couldn't find a wood stick long enough, ended up with a cheap (if you call $70 cheap) Louisville (TPS) composite stick with the wrong lie.

Got set up with my my Harrow 300 2 piece set up when they were having the 50% off sale, and THEN my LHS started stocking some JOFA wooden sticks that were long enough.

No going back now.


Last edited by Skraut: 05-07-2010 at 08:56 AM.
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05-07-2010, 12:11 PM
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Gino 14
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The last thing I do is concern myself with what another player uses for a stick. If I could afford $300 sticks I'd use them like water.

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05-07-2010, 12:17 PM
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I agree a pure beginner should probably learn with a wood stick because the additional weight will build some strength and the stick has better feel for the puck. But he/she will probably not shoot worth a damn until they take some shooting lessons and/or shoot hundreds of pucks in practice. At that point, he/she will benefit from a QUALITY composite stick.

Cheap composites have no performance advantage over wood. They are often just as heavy, have tremendously awful puck feel, and usually have terrible kick and often torque to reduce accuracy.

If you're going to buy a composite, buy something decent. Anything under $100 is not worth it unless it's a high end stick on sale.

And a beginner is not going to break a stick shooting unless they're immensely strong and have really, really terrible technique.

Also, to tag onto the "really tall people can't find wood sticks" bit, any short players (under 5'8) will REALLY, REALLY benefit from an intermediate composite, and this includes most women since they are shorter. I haven't found a single intermediate wood stick that wasn't either impossible to flex when cut down or didn't have a flimsy blade that goes sideways when shooting slappers.

Considering most companies are getting out of the wood stick business, the anti-composite folks might as well give it up.

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05-07-2010, 12:37 PM
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Frankie Spankie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dabeechman View Post
Buy it once and be happy. Being cheap usually costs you in the long run.

My personal experience with just about everything in life.
Really? I highly doubt there's much difference in the durability of a $70 stick or a stick 3x that price. My first composite stick cost me $70 and last me about 2 years playing 2x a week. I got a $200 synergy for my birthday a couple years ago and it lasted like 5 months before it already broke. I know, small sample size. But to cost more in the long run when you're buying sticks that price, the $200 stick better last well over 3 years, which I highly doubt will happen.

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05-07-2010, 01:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
I agree a pure beginner should probably learn with a wood stick because the additional weight will build some strength and the stick has better feel for the puck. But he/she will probably not shoot worth a damn until they take some shooting lessons and/or shoot hundreds of pucks in practice. At that point, he/she will benefit from a QUALITY composite stick.

Cheap composites have no performance advantage over wood. They are often just as heavy, have tremendously awful puck feel, and usually have terrible kick and often torque to reduce accuracy.

If you're going to buy a composite, buy something decent. Anything under $100 is not worth it unless it's a high end stick on sale.

And a beginner is not going to break a stick shooting unless they're immensely strong and have really, really terrible technique.

Also, to tag onto the "really tall people can't find wood sticks" bit, any short players (under 5'8) will REALLY, REALLY benefit from an intermediate composite, and this includes most women since they are shorter. I haven't found a single intermediate wood stick that wasn't either impossible to flex when cut down or didn't have a flimsy blade that goes sideways when shooting slappers.

Considering most companies are getting out of the wood stick business, the anti-composite folks might as well give it up.
A+ post!, I am 5'4 and a long with other short players It is hard to find sticks that have enough whip without cutting 3-4 inches off a senior. So going with an INT is a solid choice since only 1/2-3/4 of an inch needs to be cut to fit MY height, and the whipness is still intact.

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05-07-2010, 09:09 PM
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dabeechman
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Really? I highly doubt there's much difference in the durability of a $70 stick or a stick 3x that price
Can you show me where I said an expensive stick will be more durable? I have a cheap composite that is built like a tank. Good luck breaking it, but also good luck flexing it.

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05-07-2010, 09:53 PM
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Look guys, beginners should avoid anything other than wood sticks for several reasons. 1) Beginners don't know what flex/lie/curve they need and that WILL change as they improve. Most beginners skate upright and need a high lie but as they improve, they skate properly with more knee bend, the puck further in front and have to switch to a lower lie. A lot of hockey players don't realize this and have problems stick handling for a long time because they're using an improper lie.

2) The forgiveness of wood blades are still usually the best. I see many beginners who can't catch a pass to save their lives because they've just taken up hockey and are using a a really stiff composite blade. This also affects stick handling.

3) Players often improve their shooting technique and shooting muscle strength as they improve, so they often need a stiffer flex.

Simply put, for beginners, wood is often best.

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05-08-2010, 12:28 AM
  #23
Heat McManus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skraut View Post
3. Those who are 6'4" and try to buy their first stick in the offseason. Went to 8 different stores between the LHS, the PIAS, Dicks, etc. Couldn't find a wood stick long enough, ended up with a cheap (if you call $70 cheap) Louisville (TPS) composite stick with the wrong lie.

Got set up with my my Harrow 300 2 piece set up when they were having the 50% off sale, and THEN my LHS started stocking some JOFA wooden sticks that were long enough.

No going back now.
In the OPS range, $70 is definitely cheap.

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05-08-2010, 08:56 AM
  #24
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Originally Posted by Gino 14 View Post
The last thing I do is concern myself with what another player uses for a stick. If I could afford $300 sticks I'd use them like water.
ME TOO!!! if youth hockey wasn't so friggin expensive, I might have some money left to spend on myself.

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05-08-2010, 10:55 AM
  #25
macgyverthatshiz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heat McManus View Post
In the OPS range, $70 is definitely cheap.
70 bucks is def. not cheap, but in relation to $250.00, it is. Thanks for all of the feedback by the way. Interesting to see everybody's opinions

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