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Trouble Elevating my Wrister

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05-11-2010, 05:51 PM
  #1
Galchenyuk27
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Trouble Elevating my Wrister

Hey folks, pretty self explanitory here unfortunately. I had taken a long hiatus from the game, maybe 3 or 4 years. Last hockey I was playing was inline ball hockey, and I had stopped playing ice hockey a year or two before that.

Long story short, it's been awhile. I just got skates again, bought a shooting board, a stick, and a load of pucks, and me and my buddies who have played hockey their whole lives are shooting pucks every day at his house, where he has a range with a goal and everything.

First thing my friends realized is that I really didn't have a wrist shot at all, which is sad, I was just doing more of a snapshot. I have no problems elevating those.

Now that I'm doing a proper wrister, I can't get it above maybe a foot off the ground. I'm starting the puck maybe a foot behind my back foot, shooting it, and trying to point towards my target.

Can anyone advise me on what I could be doing wrong? My wrist show now, although low, is pretty hard. Definitely a decent shot if that's what I intended to do every time, but it isn't, exactly.

Any words of advice?

Thanks a lot, guys.

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05-11-2010, 05:58 PM
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Skraut
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elevation in shooting the wrister is all about the follow through. Point at your target. Follow through high to shoot high, follow through low to shoot low.

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05-11-2010, 06:38 PM
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jlnjcb
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I found www.howtohockey.com really helpful. They have tons of shooting tips. check it out.

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05-11-2010, 08:14 PM
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Jarick
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Make sure to pull back with your top hand and snap your wrists at the release point. Also, release the puck at or past your front foot at first. If you can upload a video that might help too.

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05-11-2010, 09:24 PM
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Change the curve if your stick?

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05-11-2010, 10:16 PM
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I considered it maybe being the curve, but I doubt it. I will try another curve tomorrow while at my friend's shooting range. Any other tips? I guess I have to keep working on my follow through and such. I mean right now it feels like I'm doing the right thing, but I guess it's apparent I'm not.

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05-11-2010, 11:07 PM
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It should all come with practice. When I first started I couldn't lift it and it was pretty frustrating because I thought it would be so easy, but just spend some time snapping those wrists, and aiming your follow through where you want the puck to go. Unless you use a totally straight blade, I don't think you should change curves. Learn on what you have now and once you have the technique down you will be able to shoot with nearly every curve given a period of familiarization.

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05-12-2010, 12:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Make sure to pull back with your top hand and snap your wrists at the release point. Also, release the puck at or past your front foot at first. If you can upload a video that might help too.
Quoted for accuracy...

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05-12-2010, 09:01 PM
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snap the wrists

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05-12-2010, 09:44 PM
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meanolthing
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I cannot over-emphasize the importance of weight transfer. Other people on the board will argue this with me, but when I shoot, I NEED to shift my weight from my back foot to my front one during the follow-through. Otherwise my wrister is complete weaksauce. You might also consider shooting with your hockey gloves on when you're on the range. It might be psychological, but I can never get a decent shot off barehanded.

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05-12-2010, 10:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meanolthing View Post
I cannot over-emphasize the importance of weight transfer. Other people on the board will argue this with me, but when I shoot, I NEED to shift my weight from my back foot to my front one during the follow-through. Otherwise my wrister is complete weaksauce. You might also consider shooting with your hockey gloves on when you're on the range. It might be psychological, but I can never get a decent shot off barehanded.
Sounds like weight transfer is a personal problem. The speed of those shots comes from the technique of the snap. Moving the puck from heal to toe and releasing at the right time.

Edit: I'm not saying its not important but its not where a huge amount of the shot strength is generated from, you can see an example of this when you see NHL players shoot and the rifle off ***** with little to no shifting besides at the hips.


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05-12-2010, 10:24 PM
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Originally Posted by LyNX27 View Post
Sounds like weight transfer is a personal problem. The speed of those shots comes from the technique of the snap. Moving the puck from heal to toe and releasing at the right time.
Weight transfer is something you should do whenever you can, but sometimes in game, you can't. It's important to practice shooting off the inside foot, left for lefties and right for righties, shooting off the wrong foot and shooting in stride. If you can do all three, you'll see your goal totals go up.

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05-12-2010, 11:08 PM
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I usually do wear gloves.

I'm going back tomorrow. How should my stick end up when I follow through?

Let's say I'm aiming top left. I'm a righty shot. I start a little behind my back foot, end up with the stick pointing towards the top left corner, whereas I can look down it as if it were a rifle? Does the blade point up? Does that matter?

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05-13-2010, 01:05 AM
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TheHMan
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Biggest part of getting a really good wrister that you can shoot accurately is the wrist snap. This guy demonstrates it really well:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCwFOR9P6Dg

Literally what you're trying to do with this whole maneuver is trying to spin the puck, get it stuck to the blade of your stick, and lifting it off the surface as you do so. So as you push the puck through with your shot, just try to adjust the angle and pressure on your stick so that you're almost trying to scoop the puck off the shooting surface and throwing it at the target. This is why when people say you have to roll your wrists, and they say Over-Under-Over, they're trying to get you to open the blade a bit and close it again in order to get on your stick, and directed at the area that you follow through with.

Others have mentioned following through and weight transfer, but those things alone aren't going to get the puck up. You can follow through as high as you want, or lean on one foot as much as you want, but unless you get the wrist snap and the timing of it in your shooting motion right, that shot isn't going a few inches above the ground. They're good habits, and you should probably go along with them, but it's not something you really need to be focusing on in order to get the desired results.


Last edited by TheHMan: 05-13-2010 at 01:10 AM.
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05-13-2010, 10:03 AM
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HMan described it well. If you think of weight transfer, all that is will be forward momentum, which increases speed, but doesn't affect the trajectory.

Without the wrist snapping, all you're doing is passing the puck really hard, and that will never raise the puck unless it kind of gets bobbled up in the air.

By cupping the puck, opening the blade as the puck rolls down towards the toe, then snapping your wrists aggressively while closing the blade, you're keeping the puck on the blade while you direct the shot by pointing your stick at the target on the follow through.

That video linked above is great, as it this one.

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05-13-2010, 07:38 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Habs Fan in NJ View Post
I usually do wear gloves.

I'm going back tomorrow. How should my stick end up when I follow through?

Let's say I'm aiming top left. I'm a righty shot. I start a little behind my back foot, end up with the stick pointing towards the top left corner, whereas I can look down it as if it were a rifle? Does the blade point up? Does that matter?
where are you practicing this? on the ice somewhere or your shooting board.

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05-15-2010, 10:26 AM
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Galchenyuk27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muttley View Post
where are you practicing this? on the ice somewhere or your shooting board.
Shooting boards for now.

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05-15-2010, 04:11 PM
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Don't worry, you'll get it. It just takes time. 6 or 7 years ago after having not played for a few years, I couldn't ever head my wrister below head level. Just keep working on it.

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05-16-2010, 02:16 AM
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I have posted this before and everyone here has covered it well but this photo I have posted before shows how you can look down your shaft at your target.

I do this and it is accurate. After the puck leaves your blade and your followthrough is done you should be able to look down your stick at the net.

If you miss the net a lot try this, when looking down your stick you will see that the net is not where the blade is when looking down your shaft.

It is a simple thing to practice and it really does work especiallywhen making a shot from the point far out from the goal. You don't have to look exactly down the shaft but should generally see the net there in front of you as your eyes follow the puck you just shot.


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05-16-2010, 11:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Habs Fan in NJ View Post
Shooting boards for now.
You're probably better off doing it on the ice to supplement shooting boards. Why not go to a stick & puck session? It's the best place to practice.

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05-17-2010, 01:33 PM
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Galchenyuk27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muttley View Post
You're probably better off doing it on the ice to supplement shooting boards. Why not go to a stick & puck session? It's the best place to practice.
Actually, my local ice rink just began doing these. Before now, I was dying for them to actually have them. But now I'll have to see what I can do on ice.

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05-18-2010, 08:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Habs Fan in NJ View Post
Actually, my local ice rink just began doing these. Before now, I was dying for them to actually have them. But now I'll have to see what I can do on ice.
Really? Where?

The only one I know of is in Rockland County, NY

Edit: Never mind. I assumed you meant Ice Vault as that's the closest to Hawthorne so I quickly just checked their website. Now I don't have to drive that far away. Thanks for posting this.

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05-18-2010, 08:57 PM
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I read most of the posts and i cant beleve nobody has said this.

ITS A TON EASYER TO GET YOUR SHOT HIGH WHEN YOU HAVE THE PUCK ON THE HEAL OF YOUR BLADE.

Have it on your heal, then push forward so the puck starts rotating counter-clockwise to the toe. Then flick the wrists.

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05-18-2010, 10:24 PM
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Can't believe the amount of people on this site who tell others that have trouble elevating the puck to "change to a different curve."

WHAT. Although different curves lend themselves to doing certain things easier or more efficiently, a bigger or different type of curve should NOT be what you use to change your shot velocity or height. Adding more curve to gain elevation is merely a crutch for those who can't shoot. Ever see the kids that used the Yzerman/Gaborik/Coffee curves and upon switching to anything else all their shots look more like passes? That's why.

Learn the dynamics of shooting properly, practice them until your shot is both hard and accurate, and THEN you can switch around curves and find out what you like.

Given that info, the problem is likely either with your follow-through or the spot at which you're snapping your wrists (if at all) in terms of puck relationship to the body. If you're snapping your wrists too far out in front of you or not at all, you're not getting that puck to roll along your blade and more so just pushing it forward.

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05-18-2010, 10:41 PM
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Jerry Lundegaard
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skraut View Post
elevation in shooting the wrister is all about the follow through. Point at your target. Follow through high to shoot high, follow through low to shoot low.


this pretty much solves your problem. follow-through is important and often neglected

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