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Snap Shot Question

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Old
05-16-2010, 08:52 AM
  #1
TheHMan
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Snap Shot Question

Right now I'm working through a couple of different types of shots. The snap shot is giving me a bit of an issue with height.

There are two ways that I've learned to do a snap shot, one is by setting the puck in front of your stick using the heel and gently pushing it in the direction of your target, and the other is doing a slight toe drag and pulling it in towards you. Both I can do fine and I'm getting decent stability and accuracy, but the one where you draw it towards you with a small toe drag has a nasty habit of sailing high. That one in particular gets a good amount of spin, and it can be quite level but it's also a bit of a riser and probably tilted back a bit. It should be noted that setting the puck using my heel and pushing it towards the target doesn't do this.

One of the things I'm thinking of is the fact that I'm using a more open blade and I've heard that having that on the toe can produce that effect. Is that my issue in this case or should I be doing something to keep the shot a bit lower?

On a somewhat related note, I'm going to be changing sticks and trying a slightly more closed pattern anyway. I'm looking at the One55 but I've heard that everyone seems to prefer the vapors to it because the 55 feels heavy. Personally, I'm not big on sticks that weigh nothing and I'd really prefer something that gives me a good feel for the puck and a little bit of stiffness for passing. Is this something that the 55 does well enough or is there something else I should be looking at?

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05-16-2010, 04:10 PM
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I have both the Vapor X40 and 2 One55's. The 55 is not a bad stick, it has good puck feel but I think the Vapor line gives a quicker shot and more snappy feel due to the lower kick point.

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05-16-2010, 05:22 PM
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The one55 is pretty damn bad in the balance department, you'd much prefer a vapor x40. As far as snap shots go, the only real use for it is in motion. What you want to do is close your blade and drag it a little like you're taking a wrister, then let the puck slide about 2 inches in front of your blade and snap it off. The key to the snap shot is it has no real windup and is the ideal shot in motion...

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05-16-2010, 06:30 PM
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jablueblue
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Anything that sails high, providing it's a proper shot, can be fixed with by controling your weight transfer and follow through

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05-16-2010, 07:59 PM
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Originally Posted by jablueblue View Post
Anything that sails high, providing it's a proper shot, can be fixed with by controling your weight transfer and follow through
Yeah, close the blade more and keep it more on the middle of the blade. That's a good way to keep her down.

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05-16-2010, 08:48 PM
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Yeah, I would say just follow through lower, and point where you want the puck to go.

Either that or aim for the middle area of the net.

I would suggest just practice your accuracy.

No one is perfect so you are going to miss some of them.

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05-16-2010, 11:39 PM
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I developed my snap shot by just thinking of it as a slap shot with less wind up. I just practiced half wind ups, quarter wind ups, until eventually I got a better snap shot without winding up at all, with my blade never leaving the ice.

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05-17-2010, 01:06 AM
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Yeah that's the thing though often the accuracy is just fine, as it's dead center of where I wanted it to go. It was just the rising quality to it that makes it go over the net. The mechanics of the shot feel fine in the sense that I'm getting a decent release and it's got enough zip. It's just pitched backwards like a frizbee that's thrown at a 45 degree angle, at first it looks like it's going to hit the mid section of the net, and then it takes off.

I'll probably just work on leaning forward even more and following through real low.

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05-17-2010, 04:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHMan View Post
Yeah that's the thing though often the accuracy is just fine, as it's dead center of where I wanted it to go. It was just the rising quality to it that makes it go over the net. The mechanics of the shot feel fine in the sense that I'm getting a decent release and it's got enough zip. It's just pitched backwards like a frizbee that's thrown at a 45 degree angle, at first it looks like it's going to hit the mid section of the net, and then it takes off.

I'll probably just work on leaning forward even more and following through real low.
Are you using a Lidstrom? That's a curve I really fight to keep it down with too.

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05-17-2010, 02:13 PM
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It's a Sakic curve. It was a choice between that or some really flat curves which didn't feel nice to me. I picked it up at a clearance sale so I figure most of the good curves were gone by the time I showed up.

It works fine for most shots, wristers, slapshots, and one timers don't do this as much. It could probably just be the way I'm striking the puck and not really getting as low as I need to.

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05-17-2010, 02:41 PM
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Hey, if a curve doesn't work for you for a certain shot, might be best to stay away from that shot. Personally, if I were the kind of guy to stick my nose around the net all the time, I'd want a Drury. But for playing D, I'd be fighting it all the time to keep shots low. Sakic might be a better wrister curve for you.

If your shot is otherwise fine, I'd stick with a shot that works well for you, focus on that quick release and get it to the net quickly with velocity.

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05-17-2010, 04:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Hey, if a curve doesn't work for you for a certain shot, might be best to stay away from that shot. Personally, if I were the kind of guy to stick my nose around the net all the time, I'd want a Drury. But for playing D, I'd be fighting it all the time to keep shots low. Sakic might be a better wrister curve for you.

If your shot is otherwise fine, I'd stick with a shot that works well for you, focus on that quick release and get it to the net quickly with velocity.
I wouldn't go that far, the snapper is an important shot. Try practicing off-ice and work on shooting low with accuracy as much as you can.

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05-17-2010, 09:41 PM
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It's all in the snap of your wrist and follow through. If you can't elevate the puck, it is not the fault of the curve and does not mean you should switch to something with a larger hook or a more open-faced blade (as many people will try to tell you will fix such a problem). Just keep practicing.

Also, on a side note, it is my opinion that the shot has evolved. A snap shot is no longer the "half windup slapshot" that it used to be. A slapshot is a slapshot, regardless of the height of your windup. The snapshot is now pretty much the most common shot in the NHL as it has transformed into a quick version of the wristshot with no sweeping motion. Think classic Joe Sakic shots.

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05-17-2010, 09:57 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotty94 View Post
It's all in the snap of your wrist and follow through. If you can't elevate the puck, it is not the fault of the curve and does not mean you should switch to something with a larger hook or a more open-faced blade (as many people will try to tell you will fix such a problem). Just keep practicing.

Also, on a side note, it is my opinion that the shot has evolved. A snap shot is no longer the "half windup slapshot" that it used to be. A slapshot is a slapshot, regardless of the height of your windup. The snapshot is now pretty much the most common shot in the NHL as it has transformed into a quick version of the wristshot with no sweeping motion. Think classic Joe Sakic shots.

The problem isn't elevating it... it's keeping it down.

I worked on it a bit today, and it's gotten a bit better. If I lean forward a bit more and start dragging it from further back then it's not really doing as much of a rising action and I can hit my target consistently. I think the issue was the fact my shot was a little too far ahead in my release.

I'm still not all that happy with it though, I feel that I should be getting more power from it, and by comparison my wrist shot is probably twice as strong and more accurate as well. Not saying that it's particularly weak (I did snap a few targets in half), but I probably need to drive into the shot a lot more and get some quick flex in the stick.

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05-17-2010, 10:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheHMan View Post
The problem isn't elevating it... it's keeping it down.

I worked on it a bit today, and it's gotten a bit better. If I lean forward a bit more and start dragging it from further back then it's not really doing as much of a rising action and I can hit my target consistently. I think the issue was the fact my shot was a little too far ahead in my release.

I'm still not all that happy with it though, I feel that I should be getting more power from it, and by comparison my wrist shot is probably twice as strong and more accurate as well. Not saying that it's particularly weak (I did snap a few targets in half), but I probably need to drive into the shot a lot more and get some quick flex in the stick.
DON'T worry about that now, that will come in time. Just keep practicing with it and work on gaining accuracy. The funny thing is, despite being so similar, the snap shot works different muscles than the wrister. It's also important to work on this shot in motion because that's really the whole point of it. If you can't get on ice, put on rollerblades on a tennis court and practice it while skating on those.

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05-17-2010, 11:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Lario Melieux View Post
I developed my snap shot by just thinking of it as a slap shot with less wind up. I just practiced half wind ups, quarter wind ups, until eventually I got a better snap shot without winding up at all, with my blade never leaving the ice.
This isn't a bad idea... especially since I'm looking for a bit more power now. My half slapper is pretty good, but I never thought going down for shorter and shorter windups would translate that well. I'm going to give this a try.

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05-18-2010, 12:08 AM
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Originally Posted by TheHMan View Post
This isn't a bad idea... especially since I'm looking for a bit more power now. My half slapper is pretty good, but I never thought going down for shorter and shorter windups would translate that well. I'm going to give this a try.
I found the reverse way to be best, e.g. start with a wrister and get comfortable with it further from the blade.

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05-18-2010, 12:27 AM
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Originally Posted by donGjohnson View Post
I found the reverse way to be best, e.g. start with a wrister and get comfortable with it further from the blade.
Ok, just to be clear though... shouldn't I be lifting the blade just a bit off the ice? I'm talking about just an inch or so in order to put a little bit of flex on the shaft.

My wrister is somewhat like a snapshot in the sense that I drag it with my heel and give it a hard second pump to load the stick as I release. Keep in mind that I'm using a 100 flex and it requires a lot of force to load the stick. I would think that working down from a half slapper would help me coordinate a quick loading of the stick.

As just so you know, I'm aware 100 flex is pretty stiff and not ideal for snap shots but it's the only decent wood stick I could find and most of them are all around the same flex point. Coming down a little bit to a 90 or so would probably do wonders for these types of shots, but it's what I have to work with now.

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05-18-2010, 01:11 AM
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Originally Posted by TheHMan View Post
Ok, just to be clear though... shouldn't I be lifting the blade just a bit off the ice? I'm talking about just an inch or so in order to put a little bit of flex on the shaft.

My wrister is somewhat like a snapshot in the sense that I drag it with my heel and give it a hard second pump to load the stick as I release. Keep in mind that I'm using a 100 flex and it requires a lot of force to load the stick. I would think that working down from a half slapper would help me coordinate a quick loading of the stick.

As just so you know, I'm aware 100 flex is pretty stiff and not ideal for snap shots but it's the only decent wood stick I could find and most of them are all around the same flex point. Coming down a little bit to a 90 or so would probably do wonders for these types of shots, but it's what I have to work with now.
Flex is relative to strength and technique, if 100 is too stiff for you, then move down a bit. But to the main point, you are right, you can bring the blade off the ice or not. There are two types of snap shots, the snap-wrist shot and the snap-slap shot. In the snap-wrist shot, you barely let the puck slide in front of the blade and pop it off. In the snap-slap shot, you let the puck slide about 4 or 5 inches ahead of the puck. You can also bring the blade slightly off the ice The biggest difference is that the snap-wrist shot is about deceptive release and involves practically no loading of the stick. Which shot you should use depends on what situation you're in and your preferences, strengths etc.

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05-18-2010, 10:57 AM
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I'm with Don, try not to think of the snapper as a different type of shot, but either a wrist or snap shot with little to no back swing and a very quick release. There kind of are two versions, one involves the puck on the blade that's like a very quick wrist shot where you lean into the stick and snap your wrists. The other is like a quick slapper where you don't bring your stick higher up than about your knees. Both shots really on being able to load the stick up a lot very quickly, so whippy low kickpoint sticks work great.

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05-18-2010, 11:10 AM
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I like to set it up with a toe drag in towards my left skate (I'm left-handed). That'll let you get as much height on it was you want, dictated by your follow-through.

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