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Skates hurt like a *******

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Old
02-02-2010, 05:47 PM
  #1
Kayen
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Skates hurt like a *******

So every pair of skates i try on ALL hurt alot.
Specifically at the arches, i'm flatfooted and ti seems hte arches in skates digs into my foot and after 3 minutes on my skates it'll hurt alot.

So i went out and got a pair of goalie skates. 8 year old Bauer Supreme 1000's for $25, since i want to be a goalie and all. But the arches STILL hurt.

What can i do for this ?

I'm fairly at hockey and all, i'm 17, 5'9 170lbs.

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02-02-2010, 06:04 PM
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Heat McManus
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add a heel lift. it could help lift your foot above the arch.

have you tried Reebok and CCM skates? they have shallower arches.

Also, make sure you are not trying on skates that are too big. this will result in the arch being misaligned.

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02-02-2010, 06:14 PM
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Hockeyfan68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Heat McManus View Post
add a heel lift. it could help lift your foot above the arch.

have you tried Reebok and CCM skates? they have shallower arches.

Also, make sure you are not trying on skates that are too big. this will result in the arch being misaligned.
That is true even with older CCM skates. I have 2 pair of Tacks from "back in the day" and they always felt like my arches hurt or that my feet forgot what they felt like and tooka couple of skates before the pain went away.

I switched to Bauer and everything was perfect. I have normal arhces so your advice may work for this guy who does not have normal arches perfectly.

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02-02-2010, 06:16 PM
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SouthpawTRK
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My feet are a combination of both wide with a flat arch, so there are a lot of skates that don't fit my feet. I tried on some RBK 5K's and they fit perfect (and they are a standard width). Hope that you find a pair of skates that truly fit your feet.

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02-02-2010, 11:34 PM
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Kayen
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Someone at the rink today suggested i try getting a shop to break the arches in, and then get it heatmolded to my foot, then for addded measure get dr scholls or superfeet insoles in there .

I don't have arches in my foot at all. My feet fit those Bauer skates perfect.

I was running around in CCM genuine size 7 player skates, and those also hurt a fair amount as well.
First few minutes of the skates will go well, then after that everything just hurts, and i can't evne stand on the skates. I'll have to sitout or lay on the ice, anything so i wouldn't be on my feet because it hurts so much i can't focus on much else.

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06-03-2010, 07:44 PM
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I've only been on the ice twice in the past couple of weeks and my arches were in total pain both times, though the pain was slightly more manageable the second time around, so it feels like it's getting better. For reference, I have flat feet and slightly wide feet, wear CCM Vector 04 skates, and usually wear prescription orthotic insoles in my regular shoes. I'm going to give it a few more weeks and see if things improve. If it keeps hurting I'll stick some superfeet inside and see how it goes. Push comes to shove and I may just put custom orthotics in there.

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06-03-2010, 09:01 PM
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MNWild9
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I was having a problem with my skates so i got them baked and it helped. On the other hand my girlfriend was having problems with her skates so I had her bring them to the local HS and the guy said he could punch out the sides and it helped her a lot.

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06-03-2010, 09:17 PM
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adaminnj
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take out the insoles and buy some flat felt insoles from the dollar store.

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06-03-2010, 09:43 PM
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Ducks
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I know this sounds pretty basic, but you might be lacing them too tightly in the wrong areas. The only laces that should be tight should be the top 2-3 laces at your ankle. Lace the rest for comfort, even if it means loosening them up a bit.

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06-04-2010, 12:26 AM
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denace
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I feel your pain brotha...I got some custom orthopedic insoles ( cost me 200 euro ) that and this
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The only laces that should be tight should be the top 2-3 laces at your ankle. Lace the rest for comfort, even if it means loosening them up a bit.
helped a lot

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06-04-2010, 12:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ducks View Post
I know this sounds pretty basic, but you might be lacing them too tightly in the wrong areas. The only laces that should be tight should be the top 2-3 laces at your ankle. Lace the rest for comfort, even if it means loosening them up a bit.
Same here. I used to crank all the laces tight and for the first couple weeks my feet and legs cramped up to no end. Finally I tried leaving all the laces looser (pull them snug but don't use any force) and just crank the top two laces. Pretty much, tie them JUST tight enough so you can't lift the laces with no effort (see: loose and slack), but not tight enough that they squeeze your foot. Snug.

No clue if this is your problem but it's worth saying I guess.

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06-04-2010, 08:59 AM
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If you can find a place that carries them, Graf makes heat moldable insoles that can help. Otherwise see a podiatrist for orthodontic insoles. Superfeet might help, but I'm not sure which ones specifically.

With my new skates, I had terrible arch pain, but having the skates punched out on the sides gave my foot enough room to flatten out and problem solved.

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06-04-2010, 09:23 AM
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denace
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If you can find a place that carries them, Graf makes heat moldable insoles that can help. Otherwise see a podiatrist for orthodontic insoles. Superfeet might help, but I'm not sure which ones specifically
.

So he needs a sole for his teeth huh...

Quote:
....but having the skates punched out on the sides gave my foot enough room to flatten out and problem solved.
Where did you have your skates punched out ? I need that for my inlines...they are way to narrow...

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06-04-2010, 09:39 AM
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lacing too tight kills the feet

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06-04-2010, 09:44 AM
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Try new insoles. I recently got a pair of Superfeet insoles for my skates, and they have helped tremendously. They don't stack up to the custom orthotics in my shoes, but they're good enough.

The next step up from that would be a custom aftermarket insole.... Graf has things called SIDAS insoles, which are used by a large number of NHL players.

To get those, I believe you have to find a retailer w/ the proper equipment. They have you stand in a machine that compresses around your feet to take a mold.

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06-04-2010, 10:25 AM
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Jarick
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Well damn give me some points for spelling podiatrist right

A good hockey shop will punch the skates for you. They listened to me and diagnosed the problem, fixed it, all for free (well I bought the skates there).

The SIDAS insoles are neat, they have an air bladder machine and heat mold them. I honestly can't say if they're an improvement or not over Superfeet. The sales guy told me Superfeet weren't made for flat feet, I'm not sure, mine aren't super flat. But they were free with my G35's.

The Superfeet were definitely an upgrade over regular insoles though, so it's worth trying.

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06-04-2010, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
If you can find a place that carries them, Graf makes heat moldable insoles that can help. Otherwise see a podiatrist for orthodontic insoles. Superfeet might help, but I'm not sure which ones specifically.

With my new skates, I had terrible arch pain, but having the skates punched out on the sides gave my foot enough room to flatten out and problem solved.
Can you explain what punching out skates means? Not only do my arches hurt, but my right foot toes go numb after about an hour of skating, even though I don't tie the laces that tight near the toes. I'm wearing an E width skate, but I don't think my feet are really much wider than that. I got measured at a store and tried on quite a few skates there, and the ones I bought felt great while I was there.

Honestly though, the arch pain isn't quite exactly like my arch pain that I used to get from running/exercise before I bought my custom orthopedic insoles. It's different. It's still the arches, but now my arches are kinda sore, so I suspect it's just that my foot muscles are kind of weak, since I'm not used to this sort of motion.

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06-04-2010, 12:03 PM
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Defgarden
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Also, when getting skates baked, am I supposed to have the laces super tight when I do that? I got my skates baked, and I remember the guy in the store telling me that I needed to have the skates on sorta tight so that it would correctly mold to my feet. Is it possible to bake a second time?

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06-04-2010, 12:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Defgarden View Post
Also, when getting skates baked, am I supposed to have the laces super tight when I do that? I got my skates baked, and I remember the guy in the store telling me that I needed to have the skates on sorta tight so that it would correctly mold to my feet. Is it possible to bake a second time?

Yep you can bake a second and third time.
Be carful of over tightening the skate when it's warm and soft you can pull the eyelets right off the skate.

if you take a towel and have some one squeeze the skate while it's cooling (just a bit of pressure for a few seconds at a time) and keep them on your feet, sitting (do not walk around with soft skates on) with your knees over your toes for a min of 15 min 20 is better it will mold the skate better.

I really think you should get the flat felt food beds before you try to remold your skates. Baking only molds the boot to your foot. The footbed doesn't actually mold to your foot that much if at all when you bake. Skating is the only thing that changes the footbed.

Good luck

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06-04-2010, 12:42 PM
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Jarick
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Punching means they stretch the boot out in a very specific spot. For me, I have really narrow heels, and regular feet that get wide just before the toes (like a triangle). So I got Graf G35's in D width (narrow heels, regular feet/toes) and had them punch out right before the toe box, which gave my forefeet more room to go to the sides.

When you skate for a few minutes, your feet flatten out a bit. If your skates are too narrow, the feet can't go anywhere, and that causes pain in your arch. For me the pain was right behind the ball of the foot. A good punching on either side of the boot and that pain went away.

I'm not saying that's the solution for you though, it's best to go to a reputable and knowledgeable shop. Punching and baking are pretty easy to do and if it's a good shop that you bought your skate from, should be free or little charge to fix.

Oh and when they baked my skates they just CLAMPED DOWN on the laces. You can go super tight, just don't pull UP on the laces, pull OUT.

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06-04-2010, 12:48 PM
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denace
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Quote:
Well damn give me some points for spelling podiatrist right
allright A - for you...keep up the good work !

I'll ask my local shop to do it for me...and if they can't do it, I'll aks my footdoctor

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06-05-2010, 12:55 AM
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MNWild9
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Where did you have your skates punched out ? I need that for my inlines...they are way to narrow...[/QUOTE]

go to your local HS. I just got min punched out and it really helped.

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Old
06-05-2010, 01:11 AM
  #23
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99.9% of the time it's a simple combination of lacing them too tight and new skaters laboring under the delusion that hockey skates are comfortable.

Hockey skates are *relatively* comfortable, when you find the right pair. Let's be real here though, I've worn CCM V10.0s, Bauer XXXXs, Bauer X:60s... none of them are "comfortable" when you're sprinting up and down the ice for an hour. I'm not saying I've had any complaints about my comfort level; it's just that I've been skating for almost 20 years and know what to expect by now. I don't buy "uncomfortable" skates, but my standard for what's comfortable isn't the same as if I'm going to buy a pair of New Balance, you know?

If you don't think you're going to have to break in your new skates before they're comfortable you're mistaken. Even once broken in, they'll never be dreamy. I know guys will reply "my Grafs/CCMs/Vapors fit like a charm" but let's be honest, it's because you know what hockey skates feel like and you're used to the discomfort and aches of playing ice hockey.

In my mind it's pretty simple. You can do things to ease the discomfort and certainly there are specific skates that don't fit specific feet, but in general, no matter what, skating in hard leather/composite boots with a plastic runner and steel blade attached to the bottom for an hour plus is only worth it because you love playing hockey.

Learning to tie your skates just right makes a HUGE difference. You have to find the tightness you like; enough support without strangling your feet. After that it's just getting used to being on ice skates.




I'm not trying to say you don't have unique feet and perhaps need special action such as punching out, getting custom insoles, etc. but it's more likely that you're tying the skates too tight and are expecting to skate around painlessly when you're in skates you can't have possibly had enough time to break in yet.

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06-05-2010, 02:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zetterqvist24 View Post
99.9% of the time it's a simple combination of lacing them too tight and new skaters laboring under the delusion that hockey skates are comfortable.

Hockey skates are *relatively* comfortable, when you find the right pair. Let's be real here though, I've worn CCM V10.0s, Bauer XXXXs, Bauer X:60s... none of them are "comfortable" when you're sprinting up and down the ice for an hour. I'm not saying I've had any complaints about my comfort level; it's just that I've been skating for almost 20 years and know what to expect by now. I don't buy "uncomfortable" skates, but my standard for what's comfortable isn't the same as if I'm going to buy a pair of New Balance, you know?

If you don't think you're going to have to break in your new skates before they're comfortable you're mistaken. Even once broken in, they'll never be dreamy. I know guys will reply "my Grafs/CCMs/Vapors fit like a charm" but let's be honest, it's because you know what hockey skates feel like and you're used to the discomfort and aches of playing ice hockey.

In my mind it's pretty simple. You can do things to ease the discomfort and certainly there are specific skates that don't fit specific feet, but in general, no matter what, skating in hard leather/composite boots with a plastic runner and steel blade attached to the bottom for an hour plus is only worth it because you love playing hockey.

Learning to tie your skates just right makes a HUGE difference. You have to find the tightness you like; enough support without strangling your feet. After that it's just getting used to being on ice skates.




I'm not trying to say you don't have unique feet and perhaps need special action such as punching out, getting custom insoles, etc. but it's more likely that you're tying the skates too tight and are expecting to skate around painlessly when you're in skates you can't have possibly had enough time to break in yet.
Well, aches and pains after an hour of skating is one thing. Intense pain in the arches after 2-3 minutes is something else altogether.

That said, before I try anything else, I will go and get a pair of superfeet insoles. Hopefully that makes skating at least bearable. I don't mind aches, but when it's nearly impossible to even stand on my skates from the pain, something is definitely wrong.

It's definitely true though that I have not totally broken in my skates, though I did tie them a bit looser this week than last. I think another part of it is that my other leg muscles are very sore, and simply not used to skating at all, so there's that.

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06-05-2010, 11:30 AM
  #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Defgarden View Post
Well, aches and pains after an hour of skating is one thing. Intense pain in the arches after 2-3 minutes is something else altogether.

That said, before I try anything else, I will go and get a pair of superfeet insoles. Hopefully that makes skating at least bearable. I don't mind aches, but when it's nearly impossible to even stand on my skates from the pain, something is definitely wrong.

It's definitely true though that I have not totally broken in my skates, though I did tie them a bit looser this week than last. I think another part of it is that my other leg muscles are very sore, and simply not used to skating at all, so there's that.
Do you play at Icetown? We probably are at the same rink. I've got some CCM vector 6.0's that were giving me similar problems when I first got them, so I replaced the insole. It helped a little bit, but what helped the most was just not lacing them tightly and breaking them in a bit.

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