HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

How to steal a game as a goaltender?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
06-11-2010, 02:02 PM
  #1
nightfighter
Registered User
 
nightfighter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,494
vCash: 500
How to steal a game as a goaltender?

Looking for some advice guys...

I'm playing in this summer roller league right now and my team is brutal. We are a bunch of individual sign ups so the growing pains are expected, but i never figured they would be this bad. Still, I'm playing my best as the goalie and I've been keeping the team in the games. All our losses are by 2 or 3 goals, no weak morale sapping goals...but I know that for my team to win I'm pretty much going to have to steal one. Here's my problem though. I'll be doing great after the 1st and 2nd period, but through the 3rd period is when I seem to lose it. There's always the quick 1 or 2 goals the other team scores to put the game out of reach, and once that happens my team seems to deflate. Is it a mental thing? Any strategies I can use to prevent those backbreaker goals?

nightfighter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-11-2010, 02:10 PM
  #2
Jarick
Moderator
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 23,701
vCash: 500
Yeah tell your guys to play defense and score some goals

But really, if you're stopping the shots you're supposed to stop, you're doing your job. It sounds like your team is maybe at the wrong level, or else they're all doing too much on their own. Quickest way to help would be make sure everyone's playing where they're comfortable put together consistent lines to make sure they develop some chemistry. And make sure you're talking to your guys between periods, let them know what they're doing right and wrong.

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-11-2010, 02:48 PM
  #3
PeterSidorkiewicz
Original *** allstar
 
PeterSidorkiewicz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Michigan
Country: Czech_ Republic
Posts: 15,163
vCash: 500
Better stamina?

If I play on a crappy team that gives up a ton of shots, Im the same way. Ill usually play excellent for 2 periods, and become a lot worse in the 3rd, and I know the reason is because my stamina isn't up to where it should be. When Im really tired, I lose focus, and its all downhill from there.

PeterSidorkiewicz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-11-2010, 09:09 PM
  #4
StrangeVision
HFBoards Sponsor
 
StrangeVision's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Florida
Country: United States
Posts: 14,324
vCash: 117
Yeah, I imagine upping your stamina would solve the problem.

StrangeVision is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-12-2010, 09:48 AM
  #5
SERE 24
LGR
 
SERE 24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 9,779
vCash: 500
Your stamina, but also your teams'. Which you can't do anything about. If your team is gassed in the third and not skating as hard you're getting crappy defense and it's gonna be easier to light you up.

SERE 24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-12-2010, 10:58 AM
  #6
Badger36
Registered User
 
Badger36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Columbus, OH
Country: United States
Posts: 2,301
vCash: 500
Id say its you stamina and mental focus. If you are spending a lot of time stopping shots and making saves, its going to wear you out.
It would help if your team played better defense, but improving your own physical fitness would help you stay at your best in the 3rd period.

Badger36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-12-2010, 11:31 AM
  #7
Moses Doughty
LA's offense offends
 
Moses Doughty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Drewbacca
Country: United States
Posts: 8,070
vCash: 500
Stamina and focus. Thank god with lacrosse Im very above-average stamina wise for a goalie, so 70 shots a game this season didnt make me lose it in the third. And they only scored rebounds, and in the slot. My team sucked also I feel you.

Just try to get more stamina.

Moses Doughty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-12-2010, 01:07 PM
  #8
GuitarAwesome
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 268
vCash: 500
Focus is extremely important.

Just look at McBackUp (McElhinney). When he's rolling with confidence, he pitches a shutout. Maybe fights a few people. He lets in one bad goal, oh boy, here come the floodgates.

GuitarAwesome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-12-2010, 02:45 PM
  #9
Ashe
Registered User
 
Ashe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Saskatoon SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,472
vCash: 500
Stealing games happen. Its all about being prepared for the unexpected and trying your best. Individual teams never do good, because there is a lack of chemistry and the time to meld.
Make a team outing, and have some brews or a laugh, and watch confidence and chemistry grow.

Ashe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-14-2010, 07:31 AM
  #10
AyVee
Registered User
 
AyVee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Springs
Country: United States
Posts: 1,995
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashe View Post
Stealing games happen. Its all about being prepared for the unexpected and trying your best. Individual teams never do good, because there is a lack of chemistry and the time to meld.
Make a team outing, and have some brews or a laugh, and watch confidence and chemistry grow.
This.
Yes stealing games happen, but it's almost like everything has to be right in the world in order for it to happen

At the OP:
Doesn't sound like you can really do much. To win games anyway. It's my personal belief that 'Your goalie will only look as good as the rest of the team. And vice-versa.' If they're a team of players who aren't any good but 'think' they are, the most risky thing you could do is tell them that you're the only one keeping them in the game.
Who knows though, it could lite a fire under their ***es. It could also destroy whatever level of trust/confidence they have in you.
Is your coach giving them pointers/telling them anything after games?

Anyways, back to what you CAN do.
Stamina could very well be a factor, but also a little bit of psychology goes a very long way. For example, if you're afraid to make a mistake, you won't perform very well. With even a little doubt in your mind could throw your whole game off. On the other hand, confidence alone could be a beneficial factor, or a really decietful ally. You just gotta find what works for you, man.
If it's wailing on a fellow-linemate for playing the man and not the pass (because why would you do that? I've got the man square to his shot, I can save it, if he passes I'm screwed! What the hell was going through your head!?!), or maybe it's something like drowning puppies, then that's great! I mean, who am I to judge? But I would strongly recommend stuffed animals as a good substitute, or some form of psychiatric care. For starters...

But to be more serious,
You should take note of your mindset and tendencies before the game and at the beginning of every period. Does this change at all? Why? And does it seem to be working?
If it's not, try different approaches. Some goalies like to be hyped before the game, some like to be left alone, and yet others like to be mad at the world. Find out what motivates you before and throughout the game, and why.
You'll find that you'll play better in a specific state of mind.
If you don't like what you're telling yourself, dont beat yourself up. Try and look at the positives.

Do you communicate with your defenders or other teammates? If you did, it helps everyone. Let's say if you're screened or if they have room to skate vs. a man-on. try and be the man that'll help his teammate's confidence level.

Your concentration should be constant and throughout the game. If not it could cloud your focus. You should have goals/results your striving towards. If one of them is to "be the team" "steal every game" or "not give up any goals" - those aren't realistic. But if it's , say, "to work your ass off for the entire time so that your team has a fighting chance" then you have a focal point to ease your concentration.

The pre-mindset you seem to have in front of you is that, 'your team sucks and you're the best chance they have' which is a recipe for disaster. This will only motivate you to try and take responsibility for everything, thus overwhelming you. The main thing is to stay calm and just focus on the task at hand.
If your team is not playing their best, and it's discouraging you to play at your best, then try and find some motivational factors that inspire you to do so.
if you simply can't, then what the hell are you doing with your life


I hope this helps.


Last edited by AyVee: 06-14-2010 at 08:04 AM.
AyVee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-14-2010, 09:44 AM
  #11
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
Get in better shape. Tired players make mistakes, and the same probably applies for goaltenders, too.

Also, shame on you for blaming your teammates. No matter how bad your teammates are, you should always try to look at what YOU can do better or differently to help your team win.

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-14-2010, 10:14 AM
  #12
GuitarAwesome
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 268
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
Also, shame on you for blaming your teammates. No matter how bad your teammates are, you should always try to look at what YOU can do better or differently to help your team win.
Incredibly ignorant post. Goaltender is the sole position where you HAVE to rely on your teammates, or else you're **** outta luck. He's perfectly allowed to blame his teammates if they're acting like a sieve defensively, because that DIRECTLY affects his gameplay.
Give your head a shake.

GuitarAwesome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-14-2010, 01:53 PM
  #13
AyVee
Registered User
 
AyVee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Springs
Country: United States
Posts: 1,995
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuitarAwesome View Post
Incredibly ignorant post. Goaltender is the sole position where you HAVE to rely on your teammates, or else you're **** outta luck. He's perfectly allowed to blame his teammates if they're acting like a sieve defensively, because that DIRECTLY affects his gameplay.
Give your head a shake.
You're right but so is he. It's called teamwork, lol. You're not going anywhere without the other's lending hand.
Yes, he has total right to blame his teammates, but does that mean it's not also his fault? No.
Sometimes it's obvious who most of the blame should be on, other times it's not, but what you don't do is take the blame completely off yourself. Take it for what it is and continue to play the game.
Scoring goals and winning games is as much a team effort as it is getting scored on and losing games.
One's good teamwork, the other's poor teamwork. that's how I see it in Hockey anyway. This doens't really apply to too many other sports.
You're going to get the same result if you personally take no blame for anything or full blame for everything.

AyVee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-14-2010, 03:56 PM
  #14
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuitarAwesome View Post
Incredibly ignorant post. Goaltender is the sole position where you HAVE to rely on your teammates, or else you're **** outta luck. He's perfectly allowed to blame his teammates if they're acting like a sieve defensively, because that DIRECTLY affects his gameplay.
Give your head a shake.
A good athlete knows that he can always be better.


...and at a non-pro level (which most of us play) it's more likely that his teammates are just bad hockey players instead of being good hockey players that are making bad decisions. In this situation it's better to point out to a guy what he could have, or should do in that situation instead of playing the blame game.

As a goalie, your job is to keep the puck out of the net. If your team loses 2-1, regardless of whether or not it was your fault that any of the goals went in, it still means that you didn't do your job correctly. It's a team game... you win and lose the game together. If the line "Player X just lost the game for us" has ever run across your mind, you have the WRONG mentality, regardless of whether it's true or not. If you're not wearing a C, an A, or if you're not the coach, you're in no position to make that call.

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-14-2010, 11:22 PM
  #15
vinogradov8
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Gulf Breeze, FL
Country: Russian Federation
Posts: 79
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to vinogradov8
This is the most common phrase: "If a goalie has made all the saves he is supposed to and then one, he is a good goalie" and thats what you should be doing, if your screened try and push the guy out of the way, the goalie has no rules (almost)! And it is mostly a mental thing, in high pressure games I skate better then at any other points in my life! And I always look at things positively (inside the rink, outside the rink I'm a troll).

vinogradov8 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-15-2010, 12:08 AM
  #16
Hounsy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: A wonderful location
Posts: 1,566
vCash: 559
I find if I give up enough goals early on it takes the edge off down the stretch when the game is completely out of reach all ready.

In all seriousness though do you feel the nervous energy when things feel on edge and you've hit the point the game can go either way? I know this sounds corny but I like to acknowledge it's there during whistles and play in the other end and just by acknowledging it for what it is and dipping my mind in it a bit I seem to gain focus and jump and generally can play my best hockey.

Hounsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-15-2010, 12:58 PM
  #17
nightfighter
Registered User
 
nightfighter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,494
vCash: 500
Thanks for all the responses guys. My next game is this coming thursday...I'll try to keep the focus and concentration tips in mind. My stamina could probably use some work, but it will probably take awhile before that gets up to par.

And don't get me wrong, I'm not blaming my team mates for sucking and I'm not saying I'm the only good player on the team. I'm just looking for a way to help my team win and if that means i have to pitch a shutout every game then by god I'm going to find a way to do that.

nightfighter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-15-2010, 02:39 PM
  #18
AyVee
Registered User
 
AyVee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Springs
Country: United States
Posts: 1,995
vCash: 500
There ya go!
If you're already looking for a way to do what you can to help you're team, you're already doing what you can. Be the quarterback and just keep up the communication, on-ice too.
Good luck btw.


Last edited by AyVee: 06-17-2010 at 06:59 AM.
AyVee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-18-2010, 10:36 AM
  #19
nightfighter
Registered User
 
nightfighter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,494
vCash: 500
Well the game came and went. We lost 4-3, but the team as a whole battled alot harder all game and didn't give up even when we were done by a couple goals.

I made a couple applause inducing saves, but I have to hang this loss on myself...I let in a squeaker through the five hole when the forward was walking out of the corner and flicked a weak backhander that i should have stopped. I totally overguessed the situation and was cheating towards a pass. End result: the ball deflected off my badly positioned stick and went right between my legs.

I think that's something else I have to work on...trust my defense to cover off the backdoor plays. It's just hard to do that when they haven't been trustworthy in that sense for the whole season, but then I end up getting burned on plays like this.

Very frustrating

nightfighter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-18-2010, 04:53 PM
  #20
AyVee
Registered User
 
AyVee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Springs
Country: United States
Posts: 1,995
vCash: 500
Just take it as it is. A loss, and a learning experience. Let it get to you and it'll effect your game. Glad to hear your team's playing harder though.
I also noticed you said 'ball' instead of puck. Do you primarily play butterfly or stand-up? If you're playing mainly butterfly, I recommend you play more stand-up (unless it's a REALLY heavy ball) because it's not a puck (or even if it's a street hockey puck) it's easier to elivate than a real puck so it's easier to make saves standing up.
I found that one out the hard way
The reason the butterfly was implimented is because coaches (or goalies) realized that shots tend to stay low, on or along the ice.
Not applicable to in-line, street and any other form of roller-hockey.


Last edited by AyVee: 06-18-2010 at 11:41 PM.
AyVee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-20-2010, 08:20 PM
  #21
Crosbyfan
Registered User
 
Crosbyfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 7,651
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by noobman View Post
Get in better shape. Tired players make mistakes, and the same probably applies for goaltenders, too.

Also, shame on you for blaming your teammates. No matter how bad your teammates are, you should always try to look at what YOU can do better or differently to help your team win.
He's not calling out his team mates from what I can see, and what HE can do may include leadership and directing his team in many circumstances, especially if he is one of the more experienced players, regardless of position.

Pardon me if you are one of his team mates and have been directed to this thread.

Crosbyfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-20-2010, 08:42 PM
  #22
Crosbyfan
Registered User
 
Crosbyfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 7,651
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightfighter View Post
Well the game came and went. We lost 4-3, but the team as a whole battled alot harder all game and didn't give up even when we were done by a couple goals.

I made a couple applause inducing saves, but I have to hang this loss on myself...I let in a squeaker through the five hole when the forward was walking out of the corner and flicked a weak backhander that i should have stopped. I totally overguessed the situation and was cheating towards a pass. End result: the ball deflected off my badly positioned stick and went right between my legs.

I think that's something else I have to work on...trust my defense to cover off the backdoor plays. It's just hard to do that when they haven't been trustworthy in that sense for the whole season, but then I end up getting burned on plays like this.

Very frustrating
You're entitled to mistakes as much as anyone else. Sounds like you guys played a great game. I would put this one in the "competed hard" column, and not look at it as a loss, although it was...but that's certainly better than playing a flat game as overdogs and getting "2 points, undeserved, but we'll take it" for the stage your team is at.

Playing as underdogs is an acid test when the game starts to slip away. Simply put. if you can continue to compete you are a real competitor. Not all of the winners on a stacked team can claim that, not even some of their best players.

Crosbyfan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-22-2010, 08:34 PM
  #23
SJGoalie32
Registered User
 
SJGoalie32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: TealTown, USA
Country: United States
Posts: 2,089
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightfighter View Post
Here's my problem though. I'll be doing great after the 1st and 2nd period, but through the 3rd period is when I seem to lose it. There's always the quick 1 or 2 goals the other team scores to put the game out of reach, and once that happens my team seems to deflate. Is it a mental thing? Any strategies I can use to prevent those backbreaker goals?
Mental: You get into a rhythm, you play well, you're cruising along.....but at some point you can't help but start to realize that outcome of the game hangs in the balance now, which puts a little added pressure on you. Every goalie is different, but try different mental strategies for alleviating that pressure. Maybe you skate around a bit, maybe you stretch out some, maybe you try to slow the game down, maybe you try to speed it up. Tinker and find out what works for you.

Stamina: If you face 40 shots over the first two periods, inevitably the 41st is going to be more difficult than the 21st or 31st. Build up your own stamina through gym workouts, or running at a local track, or any number of other exercise routines.

Team stamina: If you find yourself getting tired as the 3rd period wears on, imagine how the guys in front of you who have been gassing themselves chasing after the ball in your D-zone all game long feel. Eventually their legs are going to wear down, too, and they will start missing more and more defensive assignments. This will affect the quality of the shots and scoring chances you face. Not saying this to blame the team or anything, but as a goaltender you need to read the flow of the game. If we have only a couple subs for a game against an opponent with a full bench, I know my 3rd period is going to be rough. I know which players are more susceptible to allowing breakaways. I know when it is vitally important that I cover a rebound versus kicking one out. I can sense ahead of time which situations will result in prime scoring chances and either prepare for them or try to prevent them.

The opposition: Often times, in a close game, an opponent in a close game will get stronger as time winds down. In the 1st and 2nd periods, a team is just trying to get everybody in the game. Particularly against a known inferior opponent. If the score is close or tied late, you may start seeing tougher opposition lines which you never saw in the first two periods. The best opposing players are matched on one superstar line (usually for a PP) instead of spreading themselves over multiple lines. The best opposing players will start taking longer shifts, even double-shifting, while the weaker players are rotated off much faster.


These are just some of the factors that may be affecting the game play in the third period. Some of these are under your control and can be managed, some of them are out of your control but can still be overcome with practice.

And sometimes......"stuff" just happens. Fluky bounces are a part of hockey and even the best of the best of the best can't stop them. You do your best, improve what you can, and just keep at it.

SJGoalie32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-24-2010, 01:06 PM
  #24
nightfighter
Registered User
 
nightfighter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1,494
vCash: 500
Thanks alot for the advice SJgoalie. Got another game tonight. I'm gonna try to prep mentally and throughout the game and see where that gets me.

nightfighter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-24-2010, 06:06 PM
  #25
Giroux tha Damaja
Registered User
 
Giroux tha Damaja's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Mount Holly, NJ
Country: United States
Posts: 9,232
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to Giroux tha Damaja
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightfighter View Post
Thanks alot for the advice SJgoalie. Got another game tonight. I'm gonna try to prep mentally and throughout the game and see where that gets me.
I had a similar experience to yours, and I found that a lot fo what everyone has suggested has really worked.

If you do start jogging to up your stamina, I would make a suggestion that 2 or three times in each run, just go into a dead sprint and don't stop sprinting till you're about to fall down gasping for air. Then, when that happens, go back to your normal pace or as close to it as you can. It takes some will power, and you have to be honest with yourself as to whether you're really pushing your hardest. But this hard exertion and active recovery is going to do a lot more improve your stamina in a short time than just jogging.

Also that hard sprinting will do more for your legs explosiveness and athleticism than just jogging. It also helps build up your lactic acid tolerance and threshold, which is a big deal for those busy times in the third period. And mostly its a mental thing. I got so used to pushing myself to the point where I was throwing up on trees and ****, that nothing that happened in net was even close to taxing enough to alter my focus at all.


Good luck tonight. Have fun.

Giroux tha Damaja is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:09 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.