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If the Vancouver Canucks win the Stanley Cup in 1994, who wins the Conn Smythe?

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Old
06-11-2010, 02:59 PM
  #26
TheDevilMadeMe
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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
But Leetch was friggin' awesome, and IMO, much better than any of those three players I named.
He was definitely better. But then, I think Pronger was better than any player on Chicago this year, and he didn't win. Nor should he have, in my opinion at least.

A defenseman from a losing team has never won the Conn Smythe. As good as Leetch was, I don't know if he was good enough to be the only one.

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06-11-2010, 04:38 PM
  #27
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Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
He was definitely better. But then, I think Pronger was better than any player on Chicago this year, and he didn't win. Nor should he have, in my opinion at least.

A defenseman from a losing team has never won the Conn Smythe. As good as Leetch was, I don't know if he was good enough to be the only one.
In the cup finals I think Bufyglien was better than Pronger but I get your point. I also think that Timonen performed better on his own team.

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06-12-2010, 07:49 AM
  #28
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I would have went with Kirk Mclean

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06-14-2010, 12:26 PM
  #29
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Linden was one goal away from a hat trick and immortality if the Canucks had scored in OT. The captain would have won the Conn Smythe on behalf of his team. When two or three players are close, either the goalie or captain usually gets it.

One bloody goal. I lost all faith in the power of prayer that game. It still hurts.

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06-14-2010, 01:12 PM
  #30
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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
I still say Leetch, win or lose.

If I have to pick a Canuck, selecting between Bure, Linden, and McLean is awfully tough. Due to that vote-splitting, I think Leetch still wins it.
What is the format for the Conn Smythe voting? Do the voters get to pick their top 3 like other awards or do they just get a single vote for the winner?

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06-14-2010, 04:20 PM
  #31
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What is the format for the Conn Smythe voting? Do the voters get to pick their top 3 like other awards or do they just get a single vote for the winner?
I think just one vote. But not 100% sure as it has never been released.

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06-14-2010, 08:08 PM
  #32
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I can't help but think Bure had it locked up. 16 goals and 31 points is just simply too much to ignore, especially when you consider he single handedly won them the first round.

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11-04-2014, 12:49 AM
  #33
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Bumping this thread, because I feel like if I don't, this subject will take over the HOH Wingers project. Please feel free to discuss the 1994 playoffs in detail here.

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11-04-2014, 02:09 AM
  #34
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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
I still say Leetch, win or lose.

If I have to pick a Canuck, selecting between Bure, Linden, and McLean is awfully tough. Due to that vote-splitting, I think Leetch still wins it.
Leetch? Not sure about that, man. Probably Bure or McLean wins it.

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11-04-2014, 02:11 AM
  #35
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as i recall, nobody at the time didn't think it was going to be mclean if the canucks won.

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11-04-2014, 02:44 AM
  #36
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I think Leetch was the best player on either team that spring, regardless of who won game 7.

But if the Canucks had pulled it out, it would have been Bure with the Conn Smythe. Unless Linden had scored 4 goals or something in game 7.

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11-04-2014, 03:39 AM
  #37
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Originally Posted by The Panther View Post
I think Leetch was the best player on either team that spring, regardless of who won game 7.

But if the Canucks had pulled it out, it would have been Bure with the Conn Smythe. Unless Linden had scored 4 goals or something in game 7.
He was half-way there.

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11-04-2014, 04:17 AM
  #38
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Bure single-handedly won the team two series (Dallas, Toronto) and was the reason they advanced past the first round.

He had a streak of 13 goals, 17 points in 12 games. He finished with 16 goals, 15 assists, 31 points in 24 games.

He assisted on the GWG in Game 1 of the Rangers series. He scored the opening goal of Game 3; he was wrongfully ejected, then the Canucks collapsed. He scored twice in Game 5 of the New York Rangers series to keep the team alive.

http://search.proquest.com/docview/432638645
Quote:
Bure becoming hockey man of the year; Russian Rocket first legitimate game breaker in history of Canucks: [EARLY Edition]
McDonald, Archie. The Gazette [Montreal, Que] 25 May 1994: F1/BREAK.

VANCOUVER - Pavel Bure is named after his great-great grandfather, a famous Russian watchmaker. Now, through a series of timely circumstances Bure has become Vancouver's man of the hour.

He also may be hockey's man of the year. Should the Canucks continue on the road to the Stanley Cup, Bure stands a good chance of breaking the record for most goals scored in the Stanley Cup playoffs.

After 16 games the Russian Rocket has 13 goals, within striking distance of the mark of 19 set by Reggie Leach in 1976 and equalled by Jari Kurri in 1985.

...
http://search.proquest.com/docview/244327905
Quote:
TAKING CHARGE: Bure-less Canucks no match for Rangers: [Final Edition]
Duhatschek, Eric. Calgary Herald [Calgary, Alta] 05 June 1994: E1.

...

Canucks coach Pat Quinn doesn't usually match lines, but he worked to get John McIntyre on Mark Messier. That meant the Rangers' checkers -- Esa Tikkanen, Sergei Nemchinov, Craig MacTavish and others -- were assigned to shadow Bure, with not much success. Tikkanen allowed the puck to skip past him on Bure's goal. MacTavish pulled him down, one of two penalties Bure drew in the first period.

Any impact Bure might have had in the later stages ended when he received a major and game misconduct for smashing Jay Wells' face with the shaft of his stick. Not only did that end a Canucks' power play, but Glenn Anderson scored the eventual game winner 58 seconds later, with the teams playing four-on-four.

Once you get past Bure's 14 goals and Trevor Linden's nine, there's not a lot of natural goal-scoring ability on the Canucks. Minus Bure, they hardly threatened in the final 40 minutes.

``It certainly took a player out their lineup that we had to be aware of every time he was on the ice,'' said Leetch.

...

``He's the gamebreaker. To have him off like that really helped.''

...
Here's the key to why McLean was no longer a darkhorse candidate for the Conn Smythe Trophy at the midpoint of the Rangers series; he is one of the key reasons they floundered in Games 3 and 4. The lack of Bure in Game 3 made it even more apparent how much the team needed him.

http://search.proquest.com/docview/243181015
Quote:
Run of bad breaks in last two games likely ends any chances of McLean getting Smythe trophy: [FINAL C Edition]
Beamish, Mike. The Vancouver Sun [Vancouver, B.C] 08 June 1994: D2.

If he does nothing else in the Stanley Cup playoffs, Kirk McLean can go home with no regrets, no backward glances, nothing left to prove.

He has burned a permanent place in the memory, guaranteed that when there is a discussion of the greatest goaltenders in the game today, his name will be mentioned in the same breath as Patrick Roy, Tom Barrasso and, maybe after the final is over, Mike Richter.

Not a bad few weeks' work, all told.

God knows, he has delivered more than anyone thought possible, lifted up what appeared to be a disspirited group of athletes and turned the Canucks into a synonym for resilience.

But coming off his most jarring game of the playoffs, a 5-1 loss to New York in Game Three, there were indications McLean was through making life difficult for the Rangers.

When Brian Leetch split the defence late in the third period Tuesday night to set up Alexei Kovalev's winner in a 4-2 win over the Canucks, more than the Cup may have been decided on the play.

The Conn Smythe Trophy that goes to the most valuable player in postseason will surely belong to Leetch now, if the Rangers can follow through Thursday night and end the ``1940! 1940'' chant forever.

``That (Conn Smythe) really doesn't matter to me,'' said Leetch, after what was, perhaps, his signature game of the playoffs. ``I've never won the Stanley Cup before. Never been in the finals before. It's tough enough not to think too far ahead.''

Leetch was unstoppable, scoring twice and setting up two others to lead the Rangers back from 0-2, a Conn job if there ever was one.

``I was surprised as anyone to get in alone there,'' said Leetch of his Bobby Orr burst on Kovalev's winner at 15:05 of the third. ``I can't do a lot of the things that Pavel (Bure) can, but there was an opportunity there and I took it.''

...
If the Canucks had won it, Pavel Bure would have been the Conn Smythe Trophy winner.





http://search.proquest.com/docview/432641402
Quote:
Bure provided all the electricity: [FINAL Edition]
Todd, Jack. The Gazette [Montreal, Que] 19 May 1994: D1/BREAK.

...

Then an artist like Pavel Bure steps in and you feel that you'd rather watch Bure do skating drills than watch the Maple Leafs play an entire playoff series.

Bure jumps on the puck like a panther and makes things happen in the flash of a stick.

In the first period last night, Bure almost clicked with himself, flipping the puck out from behind the net, then striding out and just missing the puck when he tried to backhand it into the net.

A couple of minutes later, Bure took the puck just inside the blue line, tied Dave Ellett in knots so badly the Toronto defenceman fell on his wallet, and beat Potvin from three feet out.

In the third period, Bure almost did it again, waiting for the puck to come out of a tangle of players, then almost beating Potvin from the same spot.

No assist, but still helped

Bure didn't even earn an assist on the Canucks' winning goal in last night's 4-3 victory which evened the Stanley Cup semi-final series at 1-1, but he made it happen anyway. While Gilmour was busy swinging his stick at Bure in the slot in front of Potvin, Jyrki Lumme slipped through, picked up the puck and whipped it past Potvin.

"You've got to cover an area on a play like that," Vancouver coach Pat Quinn said after the game. "If Bure's there you've got to pick him up."

But Gilmour did more than pick Bure up, getting into a meaningless slashing game that left Lumme open.

"Hockey's the kind of game," Pat Burns shrugged, "where if it wasn't for mistakes, you wouldn't have any goals."

Bure brought a touch of class to this grinding, tugging, clutching, grabbing game. He makes you wonder, wistfully, if his little brother Valeri, property of the Canadiens, might bring that same sort of excitement back to the Forum some day.

Other than Bure, though, the only real excitement of this playoff yawner came from Stompin' Tom, who was back for an encore in the third period:

"The good old hockey game/ The best game you can name . . ."

...
http://search.proquest.com/docview/437033800
Quote:
[VANCOUVER THERE'S THIS one crucial difference between the Maple Leafs and ...]: [SA2 Edition]
Jim Proudfoot Toronto Star. Toronto Star [Toronto, Ont] 21 May 1994: E1.

...

THERE'S THIS one crucial difference between the Maple Leafs and the Vancouver Canucks - the Toronto side doesn't have the equivalent of Pavel Bure, or even a reasonable facsimile.

Bure, the quicksilver Russian Rocket, continued to place his gaudy personal stamp on the 1994 Stanley Cup playoffs last night with the pivotal offensive manoeuvres in a 4-0 victory that gave the Canucks a 2-1 advantage in their semifinal series against the Leafs.

Toronto has pretenders to Bure's present exalted status, of course, people like Doug Gilmour and Wendel Clark. But they have been inexplicably missing in action since Monday's faceoff against the Canucks.

Detonations of the Rocket have been occurring regularly since midway through the National Hockey League's 1993-94 schedule; he scored 49 times in the Canucks' last 50 games. That surge produced his second 60-goal campaign in succession.

...

It now seems most likely he'll become the first Russian player to skate as the centrepiece of the NHL's championship set.

...

And if what's probable does indeed happen, either the New York Rangers or the New Jersey Devils will have to dope out some way of defusing Bure.

The Leafs certainly haven't and neither did the Flames or the Dallas Stars before them.

...

Bure notched the opener Wednesday in a contest the Canucks would eventually capture.

But last night? Wow.

Free from the harassment imposed by Berg and his sidekicks, Bure presented a tour de force featuring swift skating and snappy shooting.

In the initial period, Linden pounced on a Toronto turnover in the neutral zone and, with a quick relay, sent Bure winging past the last line of defence. He moved in close to goalie Felix Potvin, then lifted the puck to the top of the nets.

In the middle period, during a power play, Bure controlled the puck while his colleagues took their positions. Then he delivered a pass out to Jeff Brown, whose blast from the point was directed in by Adams.

Bure easily outdistanced enemy defenders in the last period for another goal before Marty Gelinas added No.4 in the concluding minute.

Perspective now suggests this Bure masterpiece might have been as important as his overtime winner in Game 7 against Calgary. The Leafs may not recover.

...
http://search.proquest.com/docview/437021761
Quote:
Bure magic a playoff spectacle Flashy Canuck mystifies Leafs with legwork: [MET Edition]
Damien Cox TORONTO STAR. Toronto Star [Toronto, Ont] 19 May 1994: B6.

Somehow, through the din created by 16,000 screaming fans, the distinctive swishing sound of two cuts by the skates of Pavel Bure were clearly audible.

In a flash, Bure snared a loose puck behind the Maple Leaf net, moved to clear ice, then snapped the puck to a teammate. Two passes later, Jyrki Lumme deposited a wrist shot through a screen to give the Vancouver Canucks the winning goal in a 4-3 victory in Game 2 of the Western Conference final.

While Bure's original play was almost forgotten, it was the most subtle of a series of magical moves on a brilliant night for the Russian Rocket.

While the most gifted players on both sides have found the going unbearably tough in the series so far, Bure's sheer elegance and imagination shone through in last night's contest, as his emergence as a committed playoff performer continues.

He ended up with a goal and an assist, plus another seven shots that didn't get past Toronto goalie Felix Potvin, as the Leafs were all but powerless to stop him.

At times it seemed that Bure was inventing moves almost out of boredom. In the first period, he skated with the puck behind the Leaf net, flipped it over the head of Potvin while zipping past Sylvain Lefebvre, then narrowly missed swatting the puck at the Leaf net the moment it hit the ice.

...

While there were a half-dozen other offensive moves by Bure worth documenting, it was the other elements of his game in evidence last night that indicate a transition from offensive dynamo to two-way player.

In the first period, he hammered Leaf defenceman Jamie Macoun with a clean, open-ice belt, one of several bodychecks he handed out on the night.

Also, with the Canucks defending their one-goal lead in the final minute against a Leaf team that had pulled its goalie, there was Bure on the ice in a defensive posture, hounding centre Doug Gilmour.

...

While the Leaf checking line centred by Peter Zezel had handled Bure and his linemates, Trevor Linden and Greg Adams, during Monday's opener won by Toronto, last night the Bure unit found itself playing for much of the night against the Leafs' top offensive line of Doug Gilmour, Wendel Clark and Mike Gartner.

...
http://search.proquest.com/docview/385118918
Quote:
Bure stands alone in his own world of possibilities
Brunt, Stephen. The Globe and Mail [Toronto, Ont] 19 May 1994: E.8.

...

With the Vancouver Canucks pressing hard in the first period last night, Pavel Bure picked up the puck behind the Toronto Maple Leafs' net... he paused for an instant and flipped the puck over the mesh in a high, tumbling arc... And then -- think of a quarterback running to catch his own pass -- somehow Bure was there when the puck landed in the slot, before his teammates, before the Leaf defenders. He wheeled and snapped a shot on net.

...

As was the case after Wayne Gretzky's bounce-in goal last spring, the one that finally broke the Maple Leafs' heart, a debate began as to whether Bure was trying to do what it seemed he was, or whether it was just a bit of dumb luck.

A lesson learned: there's usually no point in questioning genius. Among the Vancouverites, it was just another piece of ho-hum brilliance from the most explosive player in the sport.

...

This was not, however, a case of style without substance.

...

On the Maple Leafs' side of these playoffs, it's rarely been so intense. Toronto has no Bure, though, and if anything, that was the difference. The Leafs' greatest artists, even the splendid Doug Gilmour, are more of the house-painting variety, providing high value for honest toil, but nothing to take your breath away.

Bure is a nonpareil, a van Gogh, a Picasso, a Charlie Parker. Like those other great No. 10s -- Pele, Maradona, Roberto Baggio, not Bill Berg -- he is someone who sees in his game a world of possibilities that just never occur to others... His early flourish last night was followed closely by his scoring the first goal of the game, a beautiful solo effort in which he left a Toronto defenceman flat on his back before firing the puck high past Felix Potvin.

...

There were other chances to follow, none of which Bure could finish. "I was frustrated when I couldn't score," he said. "I could have scored tonight four or five times." His most significant shift may well have been one that didn't put his name on the scoresheet. When the Canucks scored the game winner on a third period power play, as Jyrki Lumme cruised in from the blueline to pick up a pass in the slot, it was Bure's presence in front of the net that held the attention of the Toronto defence... And then, in the final minute, with Potvin on the bench for an extra attacker, Bure stayed on the ice not for the circus act, but for his defensive abilities, to help steer away the final Toronto surge.

That's like asking van Gogh to paint your bedroom or Bird to play polka... But those who know the muse can do it any way they choose.
Quote:
Works Cited

Beamish, Mike. "Run of Bad Breaks in Last Two Games Likely Ends any Chances of McLean Getting Smythe Trophy." The Vancouver Sun: 0. Jun 08 1994. ProQuest. Web. 4 Nov. 2014 .

Brunt, Stephen. "Bure Stands Alone in His Own World of Possibilities." The Globe and Mail: 0. May 19 1994. ProQuest. Web. 17 Sep. 2014 .

Cox, Damien. "Bure Magic a Playoff Spectacle Flashy Canuck Mystifies Leafs with Legwork." Toronto Star: 0. May 19 1994. ProQuest. Web. 17 Sep. 2014 .

Duhatschek, Eric. "TAKING CHARGE: Bure-Less Canucks no Match for Rangers." Calgary Herald: 0. Jun 05 1994. ProQuest. Web. 4 Nov. 2014 .

McDonald, Archie. "Bure Becoming Hockey Man of the Year; Russian Rocket First Legitimate Game Breaker in History of Canucks." The Gazette: 0. May 25 1994. ProQuest. Web. 4 Nov. 2014 .

Proudfoot, Jim. "VANCOUVER THERE'S THIS One Crucial Difference between the Maple Leafs and ...]." Toronto Star: 0. May 21 1994. ProQuest. Web. 28 Sep. 2014 .

Todd, Jack. "Bure Provided all the Electricity." The Gazette: 0. May 19 1994. ProQuest. Web. 28 Sep. 2014 .


Last edited by JetsAlternate: 11-04-2014 at 04:24 AM.
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Old
11-04-2014, 05:03 AM
  #39
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Messier is still a ***** for what he did to Linden, that cheap shot was despicable.

Linden still scored 2 goals in game 7...I would have given it to him if the Canucks pulled it out.

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11-04-2014, 09:35 AM
  #40
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1) McLean
2) Bure
3) Linden

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11-04-2014, 09:49 AM
  #41
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Bure. Easily.

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11-04-2014, 09:58 AM
  #42
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If they want to give it to the best player in the playoffs : Brian Leetch
If they want to give it to the best player of the winning team : Kirk McLean

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11-04-2014, 09:58 AM
  #43
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Common perceptions at the time was definitely that McLean would win, though I think (thought) that Bure was a better pick.

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11-04-2014, 09:59 AM
  #44
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Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
Linden was one goal away from a hat trick and immortality if the Canucks had scored in OT. The captain would have won the Conn Smythe on behalf of his team. When two or three players are close, either the goalie or captain usually gets it.

One bloody goal. I lost all faith in the power of prayer that game. It still hurts.
And this, if the vote is indeed not held between 2nd and 3rd.

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11-04-2014, 10:01 AM
  #45
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McLean or Pavel.

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11-04-2014, 11:25 AM
  #46
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No love for Tim Hunter?

I would say Bure. Would have predated Lidstrom by eight years as the first European born player to win the Smythe. Canuck fans in retrospect don't like him as much as Linden or McLean, but Bure's offensive numbers were too good to ignore. I think the hockey writers (or whoever votes for the Smythe), would have been too infatuated with his speed and explosiveness not to pick him.

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11-04-2014, 11:31 AM
  #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JackSlater View Post
Common perceptions at the time was definitely that McLean would win, though I think (thought) that Bure was a better pick.
Ya, thats the way it was perceived alrighty, and I agree that Bure wouldve been the more deserving in terms of value, overall play....
not to disparage McLean, outstanding but still. Pavel Bure was on a Mission & as one of the most electrifying players to ever lace them up....

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11-04-2014, 01:30 PM
  #48
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I could honestly see any of the 3 getting it. Bure was the best player if you look at the entire playoffs. Linden was the best player in game 7 by far, and if they won 2-1 and he scored both goals, hard to not give it to him in that scenario. But then you can't ignore how often they liked to give it to goalies.

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11-04-2014, 05:20 PM
  #49
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McLean's chances ended in the Rangers series. I posted an article above. He had back-to-back poor games against the Rangers, allowing some iffy goals that took the team out of those games.

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11-04-2014, 05:44 PM
  #50
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There were too many good choices on Vancouver for Leetch to get it win or lose. Win? Yes, of course, he was #1. But lose? No, Bure, Linden and McLean all had monster years. Reggie Leach is the only non-goalie to win the Smythe in a losing cause and certain things went his way such as: Scoring 19 goals, scoring goals in 10 straight games, not having anyone stand out for Montreal.

There were standouts for Vancouver for sure. Linden is a close 3rd with these guys so it is likely a toss-up between McLean and Bure. I honestly don't remember the media "crowning" one or the other if the Canucks won. It was really that close and they each had a case.

If I pick one? Maybe McLean. That legendary save in Game 7 against Calgary was just eye popping. It set up Bure being able to score eventually. Plus, winning Game 1 on his back in the final had a lot of shelf life. I don't know, Bure had his moments too of course. It wasn't written in stone.

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