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How to look better next season?

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06-15-2010, 12:33 AM
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vinogradov8
 
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How to look better next season?

Well, I started playing hockey this last season in December and played about 3 months (with little time on ice, like 2 times a week maybe) and before that I have never skated before. So now I am trying to look like I really tried this past summer and get my skating to a good enough level to play in several tournaments next year. Thankfully our coach believes in enforcers and old school hockey. But anyways, I am 6'0", 195 Lbs, and I want to be an offensive defensemen and I need to improve my skating for next season.

I am going to California for a month to get as much ice as I possible can and get better with skating and puck handling. I got my slapshots and wrist shots down off the ice with my shooting pad and still working on my snap shots. Anyways, I want to be able to learn the following things while im there: transitions, get faster in backwards skating, backwards crossover, get my hockey stop correct and both sides (feet don't stay together and no confidence with my right side haha), and explosive starts. Sorry for the long read, but I bolded all the important stuff haha.

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06-15-2010, 01:31 AM
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Placebo Effect
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vinogradov8 View Post
Well, I started playing hockey this last season in December and played about 3 months (with little time on ice, like 2 times a week maybe) and before that I have never skated before. So now I am trying to look like I really tried this past summer and get my skating to a good enough level to play in several tournaments next year. Thankfully our coach believes in enforcers and old school hockey. But anyways, I am 6'0", 195 Lbs, and I want to be an offensive defensemen and I need to improve my skating for next season.

I am going to California for a month to get as much ice as I possible can and get better with skating and puck handling. I got my slapshots and wrist shots down off the ice with my shooting pad and still working on my snap shots. Anyways, I want to be able to learn the following things while im there: transitions, get faster in backwards skating, backwards crossover, get my hockey stop correct and both sides (feet don't stay together and no confidence with my right side haha), and explosive starts. Sorry for the long read, but I bolded all the important stuff haha.
If you can find a good power skating class it could be beneficial. But just practice practice practice. Being a strong skater is not going to happen over night. Especially considering you never skated before it's going to take a LOT of work, time and effort.

If you want you can try reading a couple of books. I recommend Peter Twist's "Complete Conditioning for Hockey" or Laura Stamm's "Power Skating". I'd also recommend doing some more workouts like plyometrics, etc.

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06-15-2010, 01:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Anonymouse View Post
If you can find a good power skating class it could be beneficial. But just practice practice practice. Being a strong skater is not going to happen over night. Especially considering you never skated before it's going to take a LOT of work, time and effort.

If you want you can try reading a couple of books. I recommend Peter Twist's "Complete Conditioning for Hockey" or Laura Stamm's "Power Skating". I'd also recommend doing some more workouts like plyometrics, etc.
The whole league is saying that my improvement speed it very good, but I want better haha. Ive looking at those slow mo shots on hockeyshot.com and been trying to remember to do them on ice. I guess ill have to get ready for another episode of "falling" especially with some of those drills lol.

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06-15-2010, 09:57 AM
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Only two really good ways to improve at what you want, find a power skating class, or get some power skating videos (Robbie Glantz are really good) and practice on the ice at least every week. It's really hard to do it on your own, so the class would be preferable.

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06-15-2010, 10:26 AM
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I'm sort of in the same situation as you. I started playing hockey very recently and of course everyone else that is in my age group are AA calibre players (AAA for other areas). I have made considerable progress considering I have been on the ice only about 15 times and never had a lesson but the best thing you can do is get a teacher. I'm getting lessons from a guy who works at the rink who played minor-pro hockey, and that coupled with skating 3-5 times a week during the summer might allow me to catch up to everyone else if my progression stays the same. Without any teacher or guidance, I am stuck with not knowing how to fix what I am doing wrong and my progression has slowed a bit.

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06-15-2010, 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by hoonking View Post
I'm sort of in the same situation as you. I started playing hockey very recently and of course everyone else that is in my age group are AA calibre players (AAA for other areas). I have made considerable progress considering I have been on the ice only about 15 times and never had a lesson but the best thing you can do is get a teacher. I'm getting lessons from a guy who works at the rink who played minor-pro hockey, and that coupled with skating 3-5 times a week during the summer might allow me to catch up to everyone else if my progression stays the same. Without any teacher or guidance, I am stuck with not knowing how to fix what I am doing wrong and my progression has slowed a bit.
Yeah I have had an SPHL player help me a few times, he was really good, but now he is in Australia . Hopefully ill find a pretty cheap class on the rink or film myself skating and try to improve like that. Anymore suggestions guys?

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06-15-2010, 01:35 PM
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As some have said practice practice practice...but also make sure you are getting in plenty of open hockey practice because I find as much as I practice at stick n pucks etc nothing beats "in-game" scenarios and all that good stuff. Helps your mental game and physical game all at once really. In a game you wont usually have time to really think things through, you just gotta react. So take any skating classes and all that you can, but also make sure you are getting in scrimmages/open as much as possible also. Good luck

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06-15-2010, 01:41 PM
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Originally Posted by blueberrydanish View Post
As some have said practice practice practice...but also make sure you are getting in plenty of open hockey practice because I find as much as I practice at stick n pucks etc nothing beats "in-game" scenarios and all that good stuff. Helps your mental game and physical game all at once really. In a game you wont usually have time to really think things through, you just gotta react. So take any skating classes and all that you can, but also make sure you are getting in scrimmages/open as much as possible also. Good luck
Yeah, in open hockey I do some crazy stuff I didn't even know how to do, but at practice im constantly hoping I don't bust my ass because I don't want to look stupid. It just looks like it will take me decades to get to be a good skater! haha, hopefully thats not true.

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