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1954 World Championships

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Old
03-18-2005, 01:39 AM
  #1
NotedToughGuyDKrejci
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1954 World Championships

I am researching the 1954 world championships meeting between the Soviets and Canada and its effects on the style and emotion of hockey in Canada and throughout the world. If anyone has any suggestions of sources, I would greatly appreciate it.
Thanks,
peter

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Old
03-18-2005, 10:44 AM
  #2
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http://www.rauzulusstreet.com/hockey...orldchamp.html

Hope that helps

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03-18-2005, 12:21 PM
  #3
svetovy poharu
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Here's some background on the 1954 WC tournament, with links to other stories below: (If you need stats and other information, please let me know.)

http://www.collectionscanada.ca/hock...6&uidc=DOTS_ID
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/hock...8&uidc=DOTS_ID
http://www.collectionscanada.ca/hock...9&uidc=DOTS_ID

On January 12, 1953, Canadian Amateur Hockey Association president W.B. George announced that Canada would not be sending a team to the 1953 World Championships. George told the press: "Every year we spend $10,000 to send a Canadian hockey team to Europe to play 40 exhibition games (and the IIHF World Championships). All these games are played to packed houses that only enrich European hockey coffers. In return we are subjected to constant, unnecessary abuse over our Canadian style of play."

So it was rather difficult to find a team willing to make the trip when Canada returned to the World Championships in 1954, but the CAHA finally found the East York Lyndhursts of suburban Toronto. Although East York was a Senior B amateur champion, it was not up to the caliber of previous Senior A amateur teams that had represented Canada in past tournaments. The Lyndhursts easily outscored their opponents 57-5 in winning their first six games of the 1954 WC. But they faced the USSR in the final game. It was the international debut of the Russian hockey team built by the creative hockey genius of Anatoli Tarasov, but coached by Arkadi Chernyshev. The Russians introduced the science of dietitic nutrition at these games, with a doctor giving instructions on the preparation of the team's meals.

The Soviet players appeared on ice with their too-long jersey shirts, homemade sticks and cycling helmets. But once the game begins, they practise a new hockey style played at an extremely fast pace with precision passing. Because the Canadian representatives (East York) underestimate their adversaries skills, they resort to a physical contact style of play to try and counter the Soviets collective play and creativity. Commenting on the Russians, forward Eric Unger summarizes the feeling of his Canadian teammates who live the worst night of their life: "Their slowest player skated more quickly than our fastest player. I don't know if I should say this or not, but they dominated us by more than the 5 goals margin."

Even though the game was played outdoors (a converted football field) on a warm early March afternoon in Stockholm, the bad ice didn't slow the high-flying Russians. The day of the Canada-USSR game began with the sale of tickets for an extra match the following day, because if Canada beat the Soviets--a result that practically no one doubted--the winning team would be required to play off against Sweden to decide the European Championship. But the USSR Nationals surprised everyone. Their style of play was unfamiliar to the Canadians, as the Soviets appeared to pass too much, check too little, and skate too fast.

Chernyshev, the Russian coach, had let it be known that the ultimate objective of the USSR team was to beat the founding nation of hockey. The capacity crowd of 16,725 mostly Swedish fans lined up on the side of Russia. The European press made its accusations of Canada's hard style of play and complained of the Canadian team's arrogance, explaining that even the "Communists" are more open and co-operative than the pretentious Canadians.

But back in Canada, news of the 7-2 loss came as a shock, called by some a catastrophe. In the USSR, little if no mention was made of the fact that this was not the best Canadian team. Conn Smythe, director of the Toronto Maple Leafs, wanted to send an NHL team to the Soviet Union at the end of the NHL playoffs in April to restore Canadian hockey supremacy. But what he didn't know is that the Soviets in 1954 did not have an artificial indoor icerink at that time and would not have had any ice to accomodate a hockey game in the middle of spring.

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03-18-2005, 03:07 PM
  #4
David Puddy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svetovy poharu
"In return we are subjected to constant, unnecessary abuse over our Canadian style of play."

....

....

... the Soviets appeared to pass too much, check too little, and skate too fast.
And people still complain about the Canadian style of play today when they long for the 1970's and 1980's when the NHL played a style heavily influenced by the Soviet style of hockey.

Quote:
Originally Posted by svetovy poharu
But what he didn't know is that the Soviets in 1954 did not have an artificial indoor icerink at that time and would not have had any ice to accomodate a hockey game in the middle of spring.
According to Wayne Coffey's book, The Boys of Winter, the primary arena in Moscow during the early years of hockey in the Soviet Union (just after World War II) was Dynamo Stadium, which was in the middle of a track and featured square corners.

Quote:
Originally Posted by svetovy poharu
It was the international debut of the Russian hockey team built by the creative hockey genius of Anatoli Tarasov
I consider Anatoly Tarasov to be the greatest hockey mind ever. You may want to check libraries and used book-stores for his autobiography, Tarasov: The Father of Russian Hockey : Hockey's Rise to International Prominence Through the Eyes of a Coaching Legend.

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03-18-2005, 03:29 PM
  #5
svetovy poharu
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More background on history of Russian hockey:

Soviet hockey began in earnest just prior to World War II with an intensive study program at the Moscow Institute for Physical Culture. Russians had been playing bandy (field hockey on ice) on cold winter fields during the rule of Czar Nicholas II, and the popularity of the game managed to survive the 1917 Revolution. However, hockey made very few inroads in the Soviet Union during the 1920s and 1930s despite its success in other eastern European countries.

With the advent of the Cold War, the Soviets became interested in using sports to promote their ideology, a policy wholeheartedly endorsed by Josef Stalin. The debate by Kremlin officials between bandy and hockey was intense, but in the end most agreed that hockey had the best chance of advancing the primary objective: establishing the Soviet sporting empire. The obvious outlets were the Olympics and World Championships, where the greatest emphasis could be put on competing collectively, winning gold medals and making strong statements to the rest of the global community.

During this time, Anatoli Tarasov emerged as an important figure within the hockey ranks. As a former bandy player and student at the Moscow Physical Culture Institute, he was intrigued by the possibilities of his country's newly adopted sport.
Tarasov would remain fascinated with hockey until his death in 1995. At first a successful player, he later became an outstanding coach with the Red Army (CSKA) hockey club and led them to several Soviet league championships. Tarasov was a tireless worker who practised his players hard and expected nothing short of their best effort. Chosen by Soviet sports authorities to oversee the development of a national hockey team, Tarasov would come to be recognised as the architect and father of Soviet hockey, and considered one of the best coaches in the history of hockey.

Tarasov devised training methods both on and off the ice that were considered radical at the time. Now days, most hockey programs from the NHL to youth hockey use his guidelines and methods to keep in shape. Since artificial ice surfaces were at a premium in the Soviet Union, Tarasov devoted much time to off-ice activities and a rigid dry land training program that included long distance running, soccer and swimming. Through his off-ice program, players were in peak physical condition and could skate forcefully with endurance. Once on the ice, players would learn to incorporate their individual talents into a system that would help the overall goals of the team. The philosophy of passing and skating was stressed above all else, with the understanding that effective skating would open up the ice and allow for the strategic setting up of plays in the opposition zone for prime scoring chances. For Tarasov, the most important aspects of the game were the development of skills and implementing tactics, making use of three different line combinations that were so different from each other that opponents wouldn't know how to defend against them.

By 1953, Tarasov believed the Soviet national team was ready for international competitions. However, shortly before the USSR was to make its debut at the 1953 WC's in Switzerland, their star player Vsevolod Bobrov suffered an injury. Bobrov was a legendary soccer star who was also the Soviets' best hockey player. Despite the loss of its superstar, Tarasov still believed the team was good enough to compete for a gold medal, and he lobbied tirelessly for inclusion at the '53 games. But the Kremlin would not allow it because without Bobrov, Russian officials didn't wish to risk embarrassment and the wrath of Stalin. Stalin had been so angered by the Soviet soccer team's loss to Yugoslavia at the 1952 Olympics that he did not permit the results of the game to be printed in Soviet newspapers. (It wasn't until after his death that Soviet citizens would learn of that loss in 1952.)

The debut of the USSR at the World Championships would have to wait until 1954 when Moscow Dynamo coach Arkady Chernyshev guided the Soviets to the gold medal in Sweden with a 7-2 win over Canada's East York Lyndhursts in the final game. Only the Soviets themselves were not surprised by their victory that stunned the rest of the hockey world. The Soviets had been preparing for the big moment for a long time.

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Old
03-18-2005, 03:42 PM
  #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Puddy
I consider Anatoly Tarasov to be the greatest hockey mind ever. You may want to check libraries and used book-stores for his autobiography, Tarasov: The Father of Russian Hockey : Hockey's Rise to International Prominence Through the Eyes of a Coaching Legend.
Pretty modest title for an autobiography.

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03-18-2005, 03:53 PM
  #7
svetovy poharu
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Here's more background history for your research:

It was in 1956 that the Soviet team made its debut at the Olympics and won another gold medal, but after a disappointing 2nd-place finish behind Sweden on home ice in Moscow at the 1957 WC's (a tournament that was boycotted by Canada and the USA because of Soviet action in Hungary), Tarasov was installed as head coach of the national team in place of Chernyshev. Still, the Soviets could not recapture their gold medal form. Tarasov's driven, often volatile personality began to interfere with the development of the national team and his feuds with with players like Bobrov didn't help matters. Soviet hockey head Leonid Khomenkov then began pressing for the adaptation of the Canadian hockey model and hoped to enlist the help of coaches from Canada because he believed it would allow the Soviets to better compete with their western rivals at international competition.

Tarasov saw things differently by arguing that if the USSR was going to promote its Socialist ideals along the structures of sport, it was important to stay the course by working on the "Russian" style of hockey. To do anything less would be an admission of failure that he thought was not yet proven. After a 3rd-place finish behind the USA and Canada at the 1960 Olympics, Khomenkov again argued for some adaptation of the Canadian style of hockey. Again Tarasov argued in opposition and was replaced as coach when Chernyshev was reinstalled in 1961. But his persistence would soon begin reaping incredible dividends.

In 1963, Tarasov and Chernyshev were designated as co-coaches of the Soviet national team. The two only had been marginally successful individually, but in tandem this Soviet "Odd Couple" (Tarasov=fiery and stubborn and Chernyshev=diplomatic and laid back) worked together with great success. Beginning at the 1963 WC's in Stockholm, the Soviets began the most prolific winning streak in international hockey history with the development of Soviet hockey players at its peak between the years of 1963 to 1971. Sports schools had opened up all over the country and many boys (as young as 7 years old) were playing hockey, with the Tarasov philosophy of passing and skating ingrained into their minds so that when they might reach a league team or the national team they would be thoroughly schooled and know what to expect.

Of interest, Anatoli Firsov, considered by many to be the greatest Soviet hockey player of all time, was the one player that led Canada to press for the inclusion of pro players in international hockey. Canadian officials became particularly irritated when Firsov scored 6 goals in a game against the Canadian national team 10-2 in an exhibition game played in Ottawa on Jan. 24, 1969. Many in Canada came to believe that the only way to compete with the Soviets on a level playing-field was to employ Canada's top pros. Otherwise, it was like seasoned hockey men playing against young boys.

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03-18-2005, 05:04 PM
  #8
svetovy poharu
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Before making their international debut at the 1954 WC's, the Soviet national team played a handful of friendly exhibition games a year and a half prior:

11/9/1952 at East Berlin -- USSR 13-1 over East Germany
11/11/1952 at East Berlin -- USSR 4-1 over East Germany

3/20/1953 at Oslo -- USSR 10-2 over Norway
3/21/1953 at Oslo -- USSR 8-0 over Norway
3/25/1953 at Oslo -- USSR 5-2 over Norway

10/29/1953 at East Berlin -- USSR 15-0 over East Germany
11/1/1953 at East Berlin -- USSR 12-1 over East Germany

The Soviet nationals then played 8 "friendly" training matches a month before the start of the 1954 WC:

1/29/1954 at Tampere -- USSR 8-1 Finland (2:1, 3:0, 3:0)
Puchkov (G) -- GOALS: Kuchevsky, Babich (2), Shuvalov, Bobrov (3), Khlystov

1/31/1954 at Helsinki -- USSR 8-2 Sweden (1:1, 3:0, 4:1)
Puchkov (G) -- GOALS: Kuchevsky, Babich (2), Shuvalov, Bobrov (2), Kuzin (2)

2/8/1954 at Moscow -- USSR 14-1 East Germany (3:0, 3:0, 8:1)
Puchkov (G) -- GOALS: Babich, Shuvalov, Bobrov (4), Uvarov (2), Kuzin, Cherepanov (2), Komarov (2)...plus East German player scored on his own goalie

2/10/1954 at Moscow -- USSR 14-1 East Germany (4:0, 6:1, 4:0)
Puchkov (G) -- GOALS: Uvarov (3), Kuzin (2), Bychkov (2), Guryshev (2), Khlystov (2), Komarov, Petelin (2)

2/12/1954 at Moscow -- Czechoslovakia 5-3 USSR (2:1, 1:0, 2:2)
Puchkov (G) -- GOALS: Babich, Kuzin, Petelin

2/14/1954 at Moscow -- USSR 2-0 Czechoslovakia (0:0, 2:0, 0:0)
Mkrtychan (G) -- GOALS: Shuvalov, Bobrov

2/16/1954 at Moscow -- USSR 13-1 Switzerland (3:1, 4:0, 6:0)
Mkrtychan (G), Puchkov (0:00, 3rd period) -- GOALS: Ukolov (2), Shuvalov (3), Bobrov (5), Bychkov, Guryshev (2)

2/18/1954 at Moscow -- USSR 3-1 Switzerland (0:1, 1:0, 2:0)
Mkrtychan (G) -- GOALS: Uvarov, Komarov, Petelin

1954 World Championships at Stockholm, Sweden:

2/26/1954 -- USSR 7-1 Finland (2:0, 3:1, 2:0)
Mkrtychan (G) -- GOALS: Bobrov (2), Krylov, Uvarov (2), Kuzin, Guryshev

2/27/1954 -- USSR 7-0 Norway (2:0, 4:0, 1:0)
Puchkov (G) -- GOALS: Ukolov (3), Kuchevsky, Shuvalov, Guryshev, Komarov

3/1/1954 -- USSR 6-2 West Germany (1:0, 1:1, 4:1)
Mkrtychan (G) -- GOALS: Kuchevsky, Shuvalov, Krylov (2), Guryshev (2)

3/2/1954 -- USSR 5-2 Czechoslovakia (1:1, 2:1, 2:0)
Mkrtychan (G), Puchkov (9:00, 2nd period) -- GOALS: Shuvalov, Bobrov (3), Bychkov

3/3/1954 -- USSR 4-2 Switzerland (0:0, 2:1, 2:1)
Puchkov (G) -- GOALS: Babich, Shuvalov, Bobrov (2)

3/5/1954 -- USSR 1-1 Sweden (0:0, 0:0, 1:1)
Puchkov (G) -- GOAL: Shuvalov

3/7/1954 -- USSR 7-2 Canada (4:0, 3:1, 0:1)
Puchkov (G) -- GOALS: Kuchevsky, Shuvalov (2), Bobrov, Kuzin, Bychkov, Guryshev

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03-19-2005, 07:09 AM
  #9
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Originally Posted by David Puddy:
According to Wayne Coffey's book, The Boys of Winter, the primary arena in Moscow during the early years of hockey in the Soviet Union (just after World War II) was Dynamo Stadium, which was in the middle of a track and featured square corners.


David Puddy, thought you might be interested in seeing a picture of Moscow's outdoor ice stadium from the 1950's. Link is posted below:

www.iihf.com/iihf/history/1957.htm

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03-20-2005, 06:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by svetovy poharu
David Puddy, thought you might be interested in seeing a picture of Moscow's outdoor ice stadium from the 1950's.
Thank you.

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03-20-2005, 06:48 AM
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Puddy
I consider Anatoly Tarasov to be the greatest hockey mind ever. You may want to check libraries and used book-stores for his autobiography, Tarasov: The Father of Russian Hockey : Hockey's Rise to International Prominence Through the Eyes of a Coaching Legend.
Thats a great book! The Red Machine is very good too. It gives great player descriptions and gives an in depth look at the rise of Russain hockey. ptbents34 if you're looking for some info on the 1954 WC's, I would suggest that book.

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03-22-2005, 11:10 PM
  #12
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Thank you everyone for your help, this information is all great. Now for the longshot question...does anyone know of the whereabouts of any players involved in the WCs that year? The reason for the research is that we are thinking about making a documentary about the influence of Soviet hockey on the North American game. Any info would be very much appreciated.
thanks again,
Peter

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03-23-2005, 07:16 AM
  #13
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You can find more about the Soviet Hockey history on my page:
www.russianrocket.de

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03-24-2005, 12:20 AM
  #14
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Here is a link to an interesting site, chidlovski.com. Here is a direct link to the Soviet-Canadian game of the 1954 World Championship on Arthur Chidlovis' page. The two coaches and the 14 players are listed. According to the website, Mikhail Bychkov, Victor Shuvalov, Alfred Kuchevsky, Pavel Zhiburtovich and Nikolay Puchkov plus coach Vladimir Yegorov are living. Yegorov was born in 1911.

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03-24-2005, 01:23 PM
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ptbents34
I am researching the 1954 world championships meeting between the Soviets and Canada and its effects on the style and emotion of hockey in Canada and throughout the world. If anyone has any suggestions of sources, I would greatly appreciate it.
Thanks,
peter
PM Gee Wally and Klingsor for first hand accounts.

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03-25-2005, 02:12 AM
  #16
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There's a chapter in Ken Dryden and Roy MacGregor's book Home Game where they talk a bit about the growth of the Soviet game and then the system in the 70's and 80's. I don't know if it'll tell you anything you don't already know though.

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