HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Playing with bad players

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
06-26-2010, 01:03 PM
  #1
WickedWrister
Registered User
 
WickedWrister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 5,021
vCash: 500
Playing with bad players

Hey guys,

Yesterday was my 2nd game of the season for my ice hockey team. My team, the Lions, are a pretty good team, but we have a big skill difference in some of our forwards.

I'm not a superstar by any means but I can create some offense here and there, especially if I'm with other skill players. The problem is that there are some guys on my team that have no business playing hockey. I mean they're pretty awful. Nice guys though.

So, how do you play with really bad linemates? Its kind of hard to score 3 on 5.

WickedWrister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-26-2010, 01:21 PM
  #2
SouthpawTRK
Registered User
 
SouthpawTRK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Northern California
Posts: 461
vCash: 500
I am probably the worst player on the beer league that I joined this season. I'm sure that I've contributed some positive moments during the season, but also am very aware that due to lack of hockey skills that I've cost my team some goals as well. However, I am fortunate to have very understanding teammates that will always offer advice to make my first season of hockey very memorable. They let me know when I had a good game and good moments on the ice and offer very constructive criticism when I'm not.

I would say that if the lesser players on your team cannot be mentored by the better players or they are unwilling to do things to improve; perhaps they could move down a division?

One of the best things that I like about the team that I belong to is that the primary goals are having fun and focusing on getting better as individuals as well as getting better as a team.


Last edited by SouthpawTRK: 06-26-2010 at 01:26 PM.
SouthpawTRK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-26-2010, 01:21 PM
  #3
Ani simov mal
Registered User
 
Ani simov mal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New York
Country: United States
Posts: 488
vCash: 500
Let the guy(s) on the next line skip you or just talk to the guys that you want on your line in the lockerrom.

Ani simov mal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-26-2010, 01:40 PM
  #4
BrOrpik 44
Registered User
 
BrOrpik 44's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 2,066
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
Hey guys,

Yesterday was my 2nd game of the season for my ice hockey team. My team, the Lions, are a pretty good team, but we have a big skill difference in some of our forwards.

I'm not a superstar by any means but I can create some offense here and there, especially if I'm with other skill players. The problem is that there are some guys on my team that have no business playing hockey. I mean they're pretty awful. Nice guys though.

So, how do you play with really bad linemates? Its kind of hard to score 3 on 5.
Help them out, talk to them and try to learn them the skills they are lacking in so that they can improve faster.
I am one of those guys that you would call "have no business playing hockey", I'm in good shape though but my skating skills are lacking, the guys I'm playing with are playing or have played hockey though, and as you can guess I'm the worst player on the ice.

Give them tips on what they should do, be nice and try to help their improvement, I'm fairly certain they would thoroughly enjoy having someone pointing out their flaws and what they can do to cut out those flaws in their game.

Just be patient and maybe be prepared to have to backcheck a lot because they will flubber on their offensive opportunities.

BrOrpik 44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-26-2010, 04:44 PM
  #5
Thepandamancan
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 232
vCash: 500
I know the feeling well...since I'm the worst player on my team. While I do cost my teams in certain situations, I'm trying my hardest out there and thankfully I'm improving with every week (I've played 8 roller hockey games in my life.)

Don't handle it like my team does. Don't exclude the guys from the team. Sure, maybe let them sit out a key shift here and there but do it respectfully. Don't talk about how they bad they are behind their back. You're a team, act like it.

Help them out because if they really want to play, they'll learn. Unfortunately in my situation I've had to improve on my own and while it's starting to show, I can't help but feel I'd have progressed a lot farther by now had I had my team mate's help. Remember, the sooner they get better...the sooner you all get better.

Thepandamancan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-26-2010, 05:00 PM
  #6
GuitarAwesome
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 269
vCash: 500
I get the same basic thing sometimes, my buddies always want me to play with them, but I have played a few tiers higher than them, so my skill level is usually alot higher than theirs.

The key is to keep an open mind, and just have a good time. Even if the guys suck, as long as they are good guys, you should be having fun. Personally, I work my ass off to get one of those guys a goal, cause when they get one, they are SO happy. Them scoring one, is worth more to me, than me scoring 8. I also love giving them tips, those kind of guys ALWAYS want to get better, and it's fun to help them out. It's a great feeling when someone asks you something, then a few shifts later says "wow, that really, really helps!"

Hockey is all about the fun. If you aren't having fun playing with the bad players, skip a shift, or stick with the better players you want on your line. Otherwise, it's not going to be easy for you.

If you're stuck with a 3v5 situation, try to open up as much room as possible with your skating. Try to get the weaker players to park in front of the net, and take nice percentage shots whenever you feel like it.

GuitarAwesome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-27-2010, 08:21 AM
  #7
vivianmb
Registered User
 
vivianmb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: winnipeg
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,883
vCash: 500
tell them where to go( the net ) and to have their sticks ON THE ICE. set em up.

vivianmb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-27-2010, 08:36 AM
  #8
Ozz
Registered User
 
Ozz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Hockeytown
Country: United States
Posts: 6,981
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by vivianmb View Post
tell them where to go( the net ) and to have their sticks ON THE ICE. set em up.
That's my vote. I had to deal w/this most of my playing career. You won't be able to create miracles but you can definitely help the other players, yourself, and the team out by paying attention to their play, strengths, traits, and weaknesses.

If a guy is weak in one area, either give him some tips on how to improve or suggest to him where else he may be more beneficial.

If a guy is better in one specific area and can't seem to hack it anywhere else on the ice, praise him up so that he will always want to be working his hot spots.

If a guy can pick his shots but can't stickhandle or skate to save his life, as stated above work with him to get noticed as he gets to the net which would allow others to create a play and move the puck in. Then plan to get the puck to him. Creating space for himself would be a very beneficial thing to learn as well once this is going on, of course.

Et cetera...

Ozz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-27-2010, 09:37 AM
  #9
Devil Dancer
Registered User
 
Devil Dancer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
Posts: 12,624
vCash: 500
Another option: find a better team. I got frustrated playing on a bad team in a low league, so I moved up a division. Now I play on both teams, and I love it.

One other thing to consider is that there is some benefit to being one of the best players on you team. I find myself being much more agressive and experimental than I would be if I was surrounded by superior players.

Devil Dancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-28-2010, 02:11 PM
  #10
iamjs
Unregistered User
 
iamjs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 9,631
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by vivianmb View Post
tell them where to go( the net ) and to have their sticks ON THE ICE. set em up.
That's what I did on my last team.

On the last team I played for, I was probably an average player. There were players who would score 60+ goals in a 15 game season, and there were those who would score maybe 5 but you could tell they were trying. I was somewhere in the middle with 30 goals and 50 pts.

After hearing one guy saying he was holding the team back, I decided to try to help him out. I ended up trying to match my shifts with him. After a few games with him, it seemed like he was a different player. It wasn't like he went from a guy who chipped in an odd goal to a guy who was good for 2-3 goals a game, but you could tell he seemed more confident to shoot and even seemed like he would join the rush more often instead of sitting back while a teammate tried going 1-on-1 or even 1-on-2.

iamjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-28-2010, 02:38 PM
  #11
bp spec
Registered User
 
bp spec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 9,981
vCash: 500
Me and one of my friends have been linemates forever. Last season were we top scorers in our team, you can say we carried our teams offense.. and defense. We're a great bunch of guys but just as your team, we're very uneven in skill. Me and my friend have played with a quite bad team-mate like forever. Sometimes it is very frustrating to feel like you're playing 4 on 5, I can tell, but of course you try to help the guy the best way you can.

bp spec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-28-2010, 03:00 PM
  #12
Devil Dancer
Registered User
 
Devil Dancer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Country: United States
Posts: 12,624
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by iamjs View Post
On the last team I played for, I was probably an average player. There were players who would score 60+ goals in a 15 game season, and there were those who would score maybe 5 but you could tell they were trying. I was somewhere in the middle with 30 goals and 50 pts.
An average player on your team scores 30 goals in a 15 game schedule? What the hell kind of league is that? Let's say you have 12 skaters scoring two goals a game each, that's 24 goals/game!

Devil Dancer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-28-2010, 04:24 PM
  #13
Ozz
Registered User
 
Ozz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Hockeytown
Country: United States
Posts: 6,981
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
An average player on your team scores 30 goals in a 15 game schedule? What the hell kind of league is that? Let's say you have 12 skaters scoring two goals a game each, that's 24 goals/game!
I see a few leagues around that are like that, it's weird. I don't play in them, but I wonder if it's just a shooting gallery or some teams are just completely mismatched against others.

What's the story?

Ozz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-28-2010, 05:45 PM
  #14
RaoulDuke2k
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 78
vCash: 500
I play on a beer league team with similar problems. We have a few players that are simply cones. They've been playing for years and have almost zero improvement, and there will be no more improvement. This isn't an overly harsh assessment either - I actually give them credit for having a lot of courage to get out there in-game with such limited ability. It's just a matter of starting late, not being in shape, not their sport, etc. etc...

You have to spread them around to limit the disadvantage, and therefore you are very locked as to what lines you can put together. Aside from one line with all decent forwards, the other lines are almost like penalty kills to some extent. We manage to do well b/c our better players have good chemistry and can carry the load.

It's tough since other teams tend to sand-bag it a bit, and if they can field 2 or 3 o.k. lines with moderately good skaters, you're in for a long nite. The team itself is very cool, everybody is nice and so that's a big advantage. It can get a bit frustrating though - if you are on a bad line, chances are you are not getting 5 to 10 more touches a game. Plus, hockey is expensive and no matter how laid back you are, winning has some importance.

RaoulDuke2k is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-28-2010, 09:55 PM
  #15
iamjs
Unregistered User
 
iamjs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 9,631
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Devil Dancer View Post
An average player on your team scores 30 goals in a 15 game schedule? What the hell kind of league is that? Let's say you have 12 skaters scoring two goals a game each, that's 24 goals/game!
inline league with short benches and games that typically end 16-14.

iamjs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 03:33 PM
  #16
Badger36
Registered User
 
Badger36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Columbus, OH
Country: United States
Posts: 2,313
vCash: 500
I say help them out so that they can get better. Good hockey players arent born that way, they got that way by lots and lots of practice and by people helping them get better.
As long as someone is willing to learn, you should try to help them out. Some people forget that they sucked at hockey once upon a time too.

Badger36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 06:15 PM
  #17
The Tikkanen
Pest
 
The Tikkanen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Yorba Linda
Country: United States
Posts: 6,614
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to The Tikkanen
I would advise these players to play in the proper division. Being a human cone on a team will do nothing but waste their money and piss of the guys on the team. Hockey is a team sport and rec league games are not where guys should be learning how to play. Earn your spot on the proper team by playing pickup or taking power skating classes and work your way up from the bottom. There are a TON of leagues where beginners can play and prying your way onto an intermediate team is not one of them. Earn your spot. The really good hockey players you see in rec leagues were not born good hockey players. They worked at their game, put in the time and hard work and got better slowly. So if you're surprised that some guys get mad who have been working theit butts off to get to where they're at and then some guy that just discovered the sport is on their team asking what icing is you don't understand human beings. If you're a human cone and you know you're a human cone there is a human cone league for you to play in with other human cones. Don't leave it to the team to drop you, man up and move down on your own. Go to the rink director and ask him to move you down, it's not that hard.

The Tikkanen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 07:29 PM
  #18
nystromshairstylist
Puck Control Master
 
nystromshairstylist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Deking past you
Country: Barbados
Posts: 851
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tikkanen View Post
I would advise these players to play in the proper division. Being a human cone on a team will do nothing but waste their money and piss of the guys on the team. Hockey is a team sport and rec league games are not where guys should be learning how to play. Earn your spot on the proper team by playing pickup or taking power skating classes and work your way up from the bottom. There are a TON of leagues where beginners can play and prying your way onto an intermediate team is not one of them. Earn your spot. The really good hockey players you see in rec leagues were not born good hockey players. They worked at their game, put in the time and hard work and got better slowly. So if you're surprised that some guys get mad who have been working theit butts off to get to where they're at and then some guy that just discovered the sport is on their team asking what icing is you don't understand human beings. If you're a human cone and you know you're a human cone there is a human cone league for you to play in with other human cones. Don't leave it to the team to drop you, man up and move down on your own. Go to the rink director and ask him to move you down, it's not that hard.
That's all fine and dandy, BUT during the summer league participation falls, and in the local 4-on-4 league there are not enough players to establish divisions, so everyone is lumped together. My team is mostly noobs and we got squashed last week - but WTF cares? We are learning together and will only get better.

Most of us are well over 25, so the opportunity to get a lot better has passed, but we will improve our chemistry as a team, and maybe even beat some better teams. But the league has put college and semi-pros in with noobs who can barely skate, and it is almost July so at this point anyone who wants competitive hockey will have to join another league and hope there are divisions.

nystromshairstylist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 08:43 PM
  #19
Muttley*
Zach=2 games left
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Bergen NJ Xanadu
Country: United States
Posts: 8,427
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist View Post
That's all fine and dandy, BUT during the summer league participation falls, and in the local 4-on-4 league there are not enough players to establish divisions, so everyone is lumped together. My team is mostly noobs and we got squashed last week - but WTF cares? We are learning together and will only get better.

Most of us are well over 25, so the opportunity to get a lot better has passed, but we will improve our chemistry as a team, and maybe even beat some better teams. But the league has put college and semi-pros in with noobs who can barely skate, and it is almost July so at this point anyone who wants competitive hockey will have to join another league and hope there are divisions.
Really? That is so not true. With practice, persistence, desire & the living of an active, healthy lifestyle, you can still reach a significantly higher level rather than just give up because you perceive yourself as being too old.

Muttley* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-29-2010, 09:04 PM
  #20
StrangeVision
HFBoards Sponsor
 
StrangeVision's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Florida
Country: United States
Posts: 15,278
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muttley View Post
Really? That is so not true. With practice, persistence, desire & the living of an active, healthy lifestyle, you can still reach a significantly higher level rather than just give up because you perceive yourself as being too old.
I feel like I just watched a Cialis commercial.

StrangeVision is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-30-2010, 01:14 AM
  #21
The Tikkanen
Pest
 
The Tikkanen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Yorba Linda
Country: United States
Posts: 6,614
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to The Tikkanen
Quote:
Originally Posted by nystromshairstylist View Post
That's all fine and dandy, BUT during the summer league participation falls, and in the local 4-on-4 league there are not enough players to establish divisions, so everyone is lumped together. My team is mostly noobs and we got squashed last week - but WTF cares? We are learning together and will only get better.

Most of us are well over 25, so the opportunity to get a lot better has passed, but we will improve our chemistry as a team, and maybe even beat some better teams. But the league has put college and semi-pros in with noobs who can barely skate, and it is almost July so at this point anyone who wants competitive hockey will have to join another league and hope there are divisions.
If you're in a league that is lopsided and your team is all of equal talent and skill level then that is a different topic. I'm talking about the one guy that knows he's hurting the team, that knows he belongs in a lower division but does nothing about it. Power skating classes, pickup, stick time, playing in 2 leagues at a time, training for hockey at the gym, eating better, losing weight, upgrading your equipment-there are a number of ways to get better even as you get older. There has never been a time in 17 years of playing hockey where I told myself that I'm not going to get better and maybe your attitude of telling everybody that you suck is holding you down? You don't suck at hockey, you're a beginner and to get to intermediate takes a ton of hard work and dedication that maybe you lack whereas other people will put in the effort to improve. None of us just showed up to the rink with the abilty to skate fast, cross over, go top shelf, 100 mph slap shot, etc. All those skills were earned with a lot of hard hours at the rink. My first advice to you is drop the worlds worst hockey player gimmick, drop the I suck at hockey gimmick and embrace the fact you're a beginner. No shame in that, now it's up to you to put in the hard work to improve at the game.

The Tikkanen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-30-2010, 07:59 PM
  #22
Badger36
Registered User
 
Badger36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Columbus, OH
Country: United States
Posts: 2,313
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Muttley View Post
Really? That is so not true. With practice, persistence, desire & the living of an active, healthy lifestyle, you can still reach a significantly higher level rather than just give up because you perceive yourself as being too old.
Amen to that. If players in their late 30s/early 40s can still make it on an NHL team, just about anyone who is willing to work at it can still be an effective player on a beer/rec league team.

Badger36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-30-2010, 08:05 PM
  #23
Kurrilino
Go Stoll Go
 
Kurrilino's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Calgary
Country: Canada
Posts: 5,570
vCash: 500
Send a message via MSN to Kurrilino
Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
Hey guys,

Yesterday was my 2nd game of the season for my ice hockey team. My team, the Lions, are a pretty good team, but we have a big skill difference in some of our forwards.

I'm not a superstar by any means but I can create some offense here and there, especially if I'm with other skill players. The problem is that there are some guys on my team that have no business playing hockey. I mean they're pretty awful. Nice guys though.

So, how do you play with really bad linemates? Its kind of hard to score 3 on 5.
With bad players as linemates better forget the scoring sheet.
Be the leader and teach 'em the game by playing it.
Just stickhandle a bit and let the oppoents chase you. That will open
the space for the other guys and just set them up.

Sooner or later they will learn where to go and what to do.
There is no short term way to make them a scoring threat It's just up to you
there are no bad players there are just bad coaches and leaders.

Kurrilino is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
06-30-2010, 10:59 PM
  #24
nystromshairstylist
Puck Control Master
 
nystromshairstylist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Deking past you
Country: Barbados
Posts: 851
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tikkanen View Post
You don't suck at hockey, you're a beginner and to get to intermediate takes a ton of hard work and dedication that maybe you lack whereas other people will put in the effort to improve.
Not to hijack the thread as its not supposed to be about me, but I am playing 3x week and working hard at improving. It is just a HUGE gap in skills, skating, puckhandling, etc., between me and people who have been playing since they were like, 5 - and at 40 years past that age, I can work as hard as possible but will still never become "great." I don't use it a crutch, and still work at drills intensely to improve, but like learning a language, its a lot easier for your brain and muscles to absorb new movements and motions when you are younger.

Quote:
None of us just showed up to the rink with the abilty to skate fast, cross over, go top shelf, 100 mph slap shot, etc. All those skills were earned with a lot of hard hours at the rink. My first advice to you is drop the worlds worst hockey player gimmick, drop the I suck at hockey gimmick and embrace the fact you're a beginner. No shame in that, now it's up to you to put in the hard work to improve at the game.
Based upon your suggestion, I will update my avatar to something that more accurately depicts my recent improvements. Will have to think about this one...

Back to the OP, I do agree with this poster though that someone who is at a low skill level, makes zero effort to improve and is holding the team back can be a serious nuisance. Being like that at open hockey is one thing, but in a paying league, that's just not right.

nystromshairstylist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
07-01-2010, 07:12 AM
  #25
WickedWrister
Registered User
 
WickedWrister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Country: United States
Posts: 5,021
vCash: 500
Am I a bad team mate? My team won 5-3 on Tuesday but I was playing with the bad guys again and I was held scoreless (only one golden chance, hit post). The score wasn't indicitative of how much we dominated the other team, but I left the rink that night in kind of a sour mood.

I'm all about team first, but I get frustrated when I am put in a situation where I have no chance to succeed individually.

WickedWrister is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:49 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2015 All Rights Reserved.