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Playing with bad players

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Old
07-01-2010, 01:18 PM
  #26
Cowbell232
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I play in a weekly clinic-style league here in NJ. Every Tuesday a group of guys and occasionally sons, cousins, etc. meet up. We've had people from 14 to well into their 40s come play regularly. 30 minutes of skating/shooting/drills that changes every week, and then 3 20-minute running periods with bench coaches and a ref.

Everyone that plays in it gets better and comes back for more.

But because of that nature there's everyone from D-leaguers who can't skate to fringe B-leaguers looking to help others get better. I've discovered that in the process of helping others - whether it be shooting, passing, skating, positional play, whatever - you look at your own mistakes and become a better player.

Basically what I'm saying is that the worse my team and the better the competition, the better I have to be.

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Old
07-01-2010, 04:13 PM
  #27
Pedagogue
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I by no means am a superstar but right now I am playing on a team where it's not fun. My strength is skating and speed and it's tough when your team can't move the puck out of your own zone and guys can't hit you on the fly. I also find that when I play with guys who aren't good my play decreases. When I play with guys who are equal or better my play elevates because it has to.

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07-01-2010, 05:19 PM
  #28
pzilla3
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Pretty straight forward. Be a teammate and show them a better way. Nothing drives me crazier than people who are holier than thou in rec leagues.

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Old
07-02-2010, 09:50 AM
  #29
Cowbell232
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pzilla3 View Post
Pretty straight forward. Be a teammate and show them a better way. Nothing drives me crazier than people who are holier than thou in rec leagues.
Amen!

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Old
07-03-2010, 11:25 AM
  #30
94now
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If you just tell your weak linemate to go to the net, but don't supply the puck to him, your just sending him a message that he sucks. that cannot not be productive way, pass to him instead of shooting, keep him engaged.


Last edited by 94now: 07-03-2010 at 11:43 AM.
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Old
07-03-2010, 11:36 AM
  #31
Dump and Chase
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kurrilino View Post
Be the leader and teach 'em the game by playing it.
Just stickhandle a bit and let the oppoents chase you. That will open
the space for the other guys and just set them up.


Sooner or later they will learn where to go and what to do.
There is no short term way to make them a scoring threat It's just up to you
there are no bad players there are just bad coaches and leaders.

If you are good you will be able to pull the other team out of good defensive position. If you are good you should be able to communicate to your team mates how to hit the lanes and find some open ice. Then you just open the ice up for them and get them the biscuit and give them some opportunities.


As far as no bad players only bad coaches and leaders...lol. You might be able to sell that noise in a daycare or with 10yrs and under crowd at the rink but in a competitive environment that hippy stuff won't wash.

Some people are more competitive, some have the drive to succeed, some have the work ethic, some have a natural ability and some have none of the above. For the latter this is a reflection on themselves and not their coaches or leaders.

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Old
07-03-2010, 10:25 PM
  #32
pzilla3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dump and Chase View Post
If you are good you will be able to pull the other team out of good defensive position. If you are good you should be able to communicate to your team mates how to hit the lanes and find some open ice. Then you just open the ice up for them and get them the biscuit and give them some opportunities.


As far as no bad players only bad coaches and leaders...lol. You might be able to sell that noise in a daycare or with 10yrs and under crowd at the rink but in a competitive environment that hippy stuff won't wash.

Some people are more competitive, some have the drive to succeed, some have the work ethic, some have a natural ability and some have none of the above. For the latter this is a reflection on themselves and not their coaches or leaders.
Sounds like you're comparing a rec league to the NHL.

Either way, really good players make those around them better.

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Old
07-04-2010, 12:09 AM
  #33
BluelineHammer
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I think it depends on how bad the player is. If he is a pilon then yes he should recognize that maybe he is playing at a level that is too advanced for him. It doesnt help him any playing a pace that is well beyond his, and it frustrates his teammates. It sux paying money and having to play with someone who barely skates, wiffs on shots, and can't even receive a good pass sent his way 4 out of 5 times, It's very very frustrating. He is clearly a begginer and should not be on a roster that expects at least some level of basic playmaking.

But if we are talking about someone who has holes in their game, it's up to his linemates to help him get better. I'm a defenseman and when I get a new partner to work with that is not quite up to speed I talk with him a lot. On the ice and on the bench, I'll go over what we did and how we could have been better by explaining it to the guy instead of keeping quite and resenting playing with him. It's a lot more helpful telling your partner "when I do this, I need you to cover me here" or "When you go here, i'll be over there if you need an out". Communication helps a lot.

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Old
07-24-2010, 11:11 PM
  #34
Jimmy Carter
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I think there is a lot of good advice on here. I think you gotta just be a bit understanding and try to help them out. It speaks a lot to your hockey skills if you can teach others.

For a more short term fix (still not THAT short term), try and find 1 strength they have and play to that. If they don't really have any, help build up their positioning. If you learn good positioning you don't have to be amazing at much else to at least help the team a little.

At the same time, don't baby them either. If they messed up, (politely) tell them what they messed up on and tell them how to do it better. If you keep up with this and they are actually trying to get better, after 8-10 games you'll see a noticeable difference.

I know when I first joined my roller team I was the weak link. It wasn't as bad as you described it since I'd played street for a long time, but I had only been skating a year. Some guys on the team were nice and helped me out and I got better. Others were dicks and wouldn't pass to me (even though the one and only time one of them passed to me I scored ). I got a bit better each game, but not by much. The dicks on my team quit on us 2-3 games into the next season so it was only the nice, helpful teammates left... Suddenly, I improved at quite a faster rate.

Moral of the story... DON'T BE A DICK!

Anyway, I just thought of an even more short term fix. Show them how to play in front of the net. If they provide a screen or can knock in the odd rebound, it'll boost their confidence and keep you from getting so frustrated.

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Old
07-29-2010, 10:13 AM
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ozz View Post
I see a few leagues around that are like that, it's weird. I don't play in them, but I wonder if it's just a shooting gallery or some teams are just completely mismatched against others.

What's the story?
I thought I answered on this, but if you're willing to accept an answer a month later, I'm willing to provide one.

At the time of posting, I was in a six team league that played 4 on 4. Benches were 8-10 skaters with one goalie. Of the six teams, one team was full of ringers. All the guys played at least college hockey except the goalie, who seems to be a disposable part from season to season. They could probably put an orange cone in net and it would give up only 4-5 goals per game. This team could do it all, stickhandle through traffic, never miss a pass, set up a decent looking power play, and most importantly, play defense. If you saw this team put an entry into the league, you knew they were the team to beat.

The next 3 teams seemed to be friends who played together over the years with one or two add-ons. There always seemed to be one legit superstar, one who thought he was a superstar, and another 6-7 guys who knew their window to playing in even the lowest semi-pro league has long passed but they still liked throwing the skates on during the weekend. Most of these teams believe in the Sandis Ozolinsh approach to defense: provide offense, worry about the position later. This would explain the 16-14 games that I mentioned earlier, with some even edging into the 20s. By the third period, the games have turned into run-and-gun-fest and resemble something closer to an NHL All Star game. I was on one of these types of teams. For the most part, it was fun because of the excessive offense but I'd only be lying to myself if I thought it was how hockey was supposed to be played. Most people in the league knew the defense was at best subpar, which could have also been why it such a draw for some players.

The last two teams were usually the kids of the league. They were usually 18-22, would insist on running an even shorter bench (one team thought it was OK to go 6 players and a goalie) because they wanted more ice time, or would have players on the team that wouldn't commit their weekends to the league for whatever reasons (work, playing multiple leagues, hungover, etc.) They were decent players and would actually play D, but two things always hurt them: lack of a decent goalie and as mentioned above lack of depth on the bench. They were always gassed by midway through the third, and that's when other teams would tear them apart.

The league, even with it's flaws such as one stacked team and porous defense, was actually well-matched and games were usually close for the first 2 periods. If you didn't make it a shootout with the top team, games were usually within 2 goals going into the last period. Same thing can be said about playing against the younger teams: if they didn't burn their energy throughout the first 30 minutes, they usually had a decent game.


Last edited by iamjs: 07-29-2010 at 10:19 AM.
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Old
07-29-2010, 10:28 AM
  #36
noobman
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The truly great players are the ones that can make their teammates better. If these guys really have no business playing hockey, just have them crash the net and try to pick up rebounds off of shots.

Give them pointers to help them get better, and if all else fails just tell them to crash the net hard.

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Old
07-29-2010, 12:35 PM
  #37
saskfarmboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedWrister View Post
Hey guys,

Yesterday was my 2nd game of the season for my ice hockey team. My team, the Lions, are a pretty good team, but we have a big skill difference in some of our forwards.

I'm not a superstar by any means but I can create some offense here and there, especially if I'm with other skill players. The problem is that there are some guys on my team that have no business playing hockey. I mean they're pretty awful. Nice guys though.

So, how do you play with really bad linemates? Its kind of hard to score 3 on 5.
I'm in the exact same boat as you. All you can do is play your game and position to the best of your ability and hope your linemates don't completly ******* something up

Edit: and hope that the coach puts you on a new line soon

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Old
07-29-2010, 01:25 PM
  #38
SERE 24
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I just went to my first game in a league back at home at the invitation of a friend that I knew in high school. I played college hockey and he played club hockey, so when he asked if I wanted to play in a league with him over the summer I figured it'd be decent competition. Well, first game I had a hat trick 8 minutes in and the other team was already getting angry. I stopped shooting and just started looking to set guys up for slam dunks and by the end of the first it was 7-2.

The guys on my team started grumbling about me not passing the puck enough, which I thought was crazy since I hadn't taken a shot in over 10 minutes and was ONLY looking to set them up, but it turns out they didn't like me carrying the puck and looking to set them up for a goal; they wanted break out passes and to carry the puck themselves (it's not like I carried it every time I touched it, it was just that my game IS carrying the puck and looking for a quick pass in the zone so it's kind of a habit to skate it if I have room in front of me).

So I dropped back to defense and started just making outlet passes and hanging way back, barely ever crossing their blue line. It became painful to watch. I don't know how my buddy ended up putting us in this league but it had to be C level? I definitely shouldn't have been there, but he shouldn't have been either after just playing club. Still, he couldn't do much all by himself. All that happened after I dropped back was the other guys on the team slapped the puck around, never set anything up, never made an actual strong pass and didn't put any pucks in the net. The other team tied the game when I started taking much shorter shifts on defense as well and so finally with about 6 minutes left in the third I told guys to start standing two in front of the net and one at one of the circles. I literally just started shooting pucks AT them to try and bounce one in. They ended up slapping in a rebound and having one go in off a knee and that's how we ended up winning. It was a little sad.

Long story short, I never went back for another game and just returned to playing pick up with guys I've actually played against and know can school me sometimes, but it turns out that when you're playing with guys who just can't keep up, the rule of thumb really IS get them to stand around the crease and just throw pucks towards them.

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