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Hockey Future: 50 Years From Now...

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Old
03-20-2005, 11:10 PM
  #1
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Hockey Future: 50 Years From Now...

NHL contemplating Rule changes for the game once more as well the AHL is experimenting with a Blue-coloured ice surface...I can't think of any other sport that has gone through as many rule changes over the years like hockey has...once upon a time you use to be able to have a seventh player on the ice he was known as a ROVER...Goalies weren't allowed to drop to the ice to make saves, they had to make saves from the standing-up position...as you will see from the list below the game of hockey played almost a Century ago is not the same game that's played today...

Below some of the more noteworthy rule changes of NHL hockey over the years:


1900: Goal Net Introduced

1910: Game changed from two 30-minute periods to three 20-minute periods.

1912: The number of players from each team is reduced from 7 to six...the position they eliminated was called the "Rover"

1917: Goalies permitted to fall to the ice to make saves. Previously a goaltender was penalized for dropping to the ice.

1918: Penalty rules amended. For minor fouls, substitutes not allowed until penalized player had sewed three minutes. For major fouls, no substitutes for five minutes. For match fouls, no substitutes allowed for the remainder of the game. With the addition of two lines painted on the ice twenty feet from center, three playing zones were created, producing a forty-foot neutral center ice area in which forward passing was permitted. Kicking the puck was permitted in this neutral zone. Tabulation of assists began.

1921: Goaltenders allowed to pass the puck forward up to their own blue line. Overtime limited to twenty minutes. Minor penalties changed from three minutes to two minutes.

1926: Blue lines repositioned to sixty feet from each goal-line, thereby enlarging the neutral zone and standardizing distance from blueline to goal. Uniform goal nets adopted throughout NHL with goal posts securely fastened to the ice.

1928: forward passing permitted in defensive and neutral zones and into attacking zone if pass receiver is in neutral zone when pass is made. No forward passing allowed inside attacking zone.

1929: First Offside rule Introduced

1929: Forward passing permitted inside all three zones but not permitted across either blue line. Kicking the puck allowed, but a goal cannot be scored by kicking the puck in the goal.

1929: No more than three players including the goaltender may remain in their defensive zone when the puck has gone up ice. Minor penalties to be assessed for the first two violations of this rule in a game; major penalties thereafter.

1931: Though there is no record of a team attempting to play with two goaltenders on the ice, a rule was instituted which stated that each team was allowed only one goaltender on the ice at one time

1934: Ralph Bowman of the St. Louis Eagles scores the first penalty shot goal

1937: The first rule to deal with icing is introduced.

1947: Billy Reay of the Montreal Canadiens becomes the first NHL player to raise his arms and stick in celebration after scoring a goal.

1949: The center red line first appears on the ice

1951: Home teams to wear basic white uniforms; visiting teams basic colored uniforms. Goal crease enlarged from 3 x 7 feet to 4 x 8 feet. Number of players in uniform reduced to 15 plus goaltenders. Faceoff circles enlarged from 1 0-foot to 15-foot radius.

1952: Teams permitted to dress 15 skaters on the road and 16 at home.

1953: Number of players in uniform set at 16 plus goaltenders.

1954: Number of players in uniform set at 18 plus goaltenders up to December 1 and 16 plus goaltenders thereafter

1955: NHL officials wear striped sweaters for the first time...PLUS The Zamboni makes its NHL debut when Montreal hosts Toronto.

1956: Player serving a minor penalty allowed to return to Ice when a goal is scored by opposing team.

1957: The first NHL Player's Association is formed with Detroit's Ted Lindsay as president. The owners soon crush the organization and the Red Wings trade Lindsay to the last place Chicago Black Hawks.

1964: No bodily contact on faceoffs. In playoff games, each team to have its substitute goaltender dressed in his regular uniform except for leg pads and body protector. An previous rules governing standby goaltenders terminated.

1965: Teams required to dress two goaltenders for each regular-season game

1966: Between-periods intermissions fixed at 15 minutes.

1969: Limit of curvature of hockey stick blade set at 1 inch.

1971: Number of players in uniform set at 17 plus 2 Goaltenders. Third man to enter an altercation assessed an automatic game misconduct penalty

1976: Rule dealing with fighting amended to provide a major and -tame misconduct penalty for any player who is clearly the instigator of a fight.

1981: If both of a team's listed goaltenders are incapacitated, the team can dress and play any eligible goaltender who is available.

1982: Number of players in uniform set at 18 plus 2 goaltenders.

1996: Maximum stick length increased to 63 inches...ZDENO CHARA RULE?

1998: The league instituted a two-referee system

2002: Hurry-up face off and line change rules implemented
================================================== ======

One rule change that I can see coming is the removing of the Centre ice red line...they have been talking about this one for quite some time now.....

Two part question for everyone:

(A) What are some rule changes you see coming right away to the NHL?

(B) How will NHL Hockey look like 50-years from now in the Year 2055?

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03-20-2005, 11:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monkey_00
One rule change that I can see coming is the removing of the Centre ice red line...they have been talking about this one for quite some time now.....

Two part question for everyone:

(A) What are some rule changes you see coming right away to the NHL?

(B) How will NHL Hockey look like 50-years from now in the Year 2055?
Why should they physically remove the center-line? They could just allow two-line passes. The center-line is needed to determine icing.

To answer part (A,) I really think the NHL will have shootouts when they return, and I really don't like them. I would like to see no-touch icing and tag-up offsides from the AHL come to the NHL, and those two rules probably will.

I wouldn't venture a guess on 50 years from now. Maybe they will play on giant airhockey tables with jet-powered skates.

Also, I like the way you chronicled the major NHL rule changes.

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03-20-2005, 11:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Puddy
Why should they physically remove the center-line? They could just allow two-line passes. The center-line is needed to determine icing.

To answer part (A,) I really think the NHL will have shootouts when they return, and I really don't like them. I would like to see no-touch icing and tag-up offsides from the AHL come to the NHL, and those two rules probably will.

I wouldn't venture a guess on 50 years from now. Maybe they will play on giant airhockey tables with jet-powered skates.

Also, I like the way you chronicled the major NHL rule changes.
Thanks......

I can see in 2055 where the ice surface will be much larger than the standard 200-by-85 feet that they currently employ in the NHL...maybe they will make it a rule to use Olympic-sized ice surface to help give more room for the players out there.....either that or we will see 4-on-4 Hockey which I wouldn't enjoy at all...that would be too drastic a change to the game IMO.

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03-21-2005, 12:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monkey_00
Thanks......

I can see in 2055 where the ice surface will be much larger than the standard 200-by-85 feet that they currently employ in the NHL...maybe they will make it a rule to use Olympic-sized ice surface to help give more room for the players out there.....either that or we will see 4-on-4 Hockey which I wouldn't enjoy at all...that would be too drastic a change to the game IMO.
Maybe the players will be much smaller because of the widespread famines of the post-apocalyptic Earth then.

2051 A.D. Ten years after World War 4...

Lucky for me I'd been off-planet on vacation at the time of the war.
There wasn't much to do. All the bowling alleys had been wrecked, so
I spent most of my time looking for beer.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Seriously though, are the years the beginning of the season when a rule was instated? Would 1969 for the blade-curve be for the 1969-70 season?

Also, the World War II removal and 1983-84 reinstitution of overtime is pretty important.

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03-21-2005, 12:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Puddy
Maybe the players will be much smaller because of the widespread famines of the post-apocalyptic Earth then.

2051 A.D. Ten years after World War 4...

Lucky for me I'd been off-planet on vacation at the time of the war.
There wasn't much to do. All the bowling alleys had been wrecked, so
I spent most of my time looking for beer.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Seriously though, are the years the beginning of the season when a rule was instated? Would 1969 for the blade-curve be for the 1969-70 season?

Also, the World War II removal and 1983-84 reinstitution of overtime is pretty important.
1969 would be for the 1969-70 NHL season Yes........the one that really caught my eye a while back was the one where they state "No Forward passes allowed"....the players were allowed to pass the puck back or sideways but not forward...In 1929 the NHL allowed for forward passing in all three zones the goal scoring in the League almost doubled...that's when you start to see guys like Cecil "Babe" Dye and Joe Malone tear the League apart with their 2-goals-a-game pace and better in some of those years thereafter.

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03-21-2005, 04:10 AM
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Hockey in 2055...

Steroids will be better understood and certain forms with beneficial attributes may be used in moderation and in conjunction with a balanced diet to further human physical evolution. The big controversy of the day won't revolve around steroids but perhaps some sort of nanotechnology, and the ethical issues behind melding man and machine. Integrating women and men into mutual competition might be another hot topic of the day, or an issue that has already been tackled.

The Stanley Cup is competed for by NHL teams in North America, traditional club teams in Europe, and as of recently teams from the Orient. The first woman player/coach/GM may or may not have had her name engraved on the Cup by then.

By then a new rebirth of offensive hockey may have already come and gone with the cycle about to shift back to defence again. The trap-based systems of the early 21st century were evntually rendered obsolete by a new genius hockey mind, probably a GM/coach who was fortunate enough to have the greatest hockey talent of the first half-century on his team.

No, not Sidney Crosby, someone else who may not even be born yet, who will be recognized at a very very young age as a supernatural prodigy, who can do things with the puck that we can't even imagine yet. Perhaps being completely ambidextrous, or able to manipulate a puck in 3D space, or displaying an up-to-then unheard of level of consciousness of his teammates' whereabouts and the opposition around him, or being able to fool a goalie unlike no other. Or perhaps it will be identical twin prodigies who work together as if of one single mind to bust up defensive formations. Or perhaps it will be a woman hockey-prodigy?

All in all, he/she and his/her coach could together impact the game to the point where other hockey minds are compelled to mimic them for years to come. By 2055 the new prodigy may already be retired after shattering Gretzky's records, and after having played in a high-scoring era. By 2055, new defensive schemes to thwart the offensive surge may already be on the verge of coming into fashion. Perhaps goalies develop new skills in the constant game of cat and mouse between defence and offence.

Careers of the most fortunate elite athletes may be 25-30 years long now due to medical advances and a 'better living through chemistry' revolution. The greatest advances may be sought in the field of injury recovery and muscle/ligament regeneration. Or perhaps even stem-cell research to help chronic cases. New understanding of the human brain may lead to breakthroughs in the treatment of concussions.

Television is all pervasive. The evolution of reality TV, and the advent of nano-cameras, have raised the level of audience expectation to the point where they demand POV views and expect their athletes to be artciulate and camera savvy, where they also kinda 'act' and must have entertaining, engaging 'TV personalities'. 'Sportainment' may be all the rage as the off-ice lives of mid-21st century athletes are as much a part of the total entertainment 'package' as their on-ice game.

Cameras the size of contact lenses worn by players, and perhaps connected to their nervous systems somehow, broadcast images from their point-of-view to TV audiences who see things as the players do. Human camera operators work remotely or maybe no longer exist at all. Cameras are small self-propelled robots that can give fantastic angles. So as not to obstruct arena spectators, these cameras make use of new cloaking/holographic technology, first developed by the U.S. military and just recently made available for commercial and recreational use.

Spectator capacities in next-generation arenas remain just as big as back in the late 1990's as most important hockey audience revenues are TV-based anyway. The league is long-since removed from its gate-driven days and in-arena audiences top-out at between 20,000 to 25,000. Arena building costs have been greatly reduced by advances in refrigeration. New arenas employing the superior 'bubble' shape replace the traditional box-shaped edifices as being more economical and environmentally friendly. Bubble-arena walls could have the ability to become either opaque or transparent. The NHL under a starry sky?

Travel costs and fatigue have been greatly reduced due to the popularization of trans-continental magnetic levitation monorails, which rival planes in speed, and are deemed more environmental and safer overall. Supersonic Jet lag research is making strides in reducing the disruptive effects of trans-oceanic, high-altitude flights from New York to London to Tokyo, so as to optimize athletic output.

Each continent has a league with centralized ownership, but the free market ensures that player salaries are gradually and forever on the rise as revenues continue to grow. The league is economically healthy but Unions perhaps still exist and the cycle of periodic labour strife continues and is perpetual and inevitable. However new forms of advanced business negotiations are in place to avoid lengthy work stoppages and the stoppages that do arise are brief and handled more efficiently.

A better-educated fanbase accepts the business side of things and no longer blows labour conflicts out of proportion. All players might have a stake in team ownership to some extent and own team stocks, blurring the line between emplyoee and employer to avoid worker resentment. Now a distant memory, sport business university students of 2055 laugh at the personal nature that the 'ancient' and 'primitive' lockout of 2005 took, since deemed an unecessary and very much illogical clash of human egos that almost sunk the league in 2006, and went against the prime business objective -- a detriment to the bottom line: profit margin.

The North American NHL has since expanded to 48 teams by now. 6 solid 8-team divisions with intense intra-divisional rivalries and imbalanced, division-heavy schedules. Such 'new' markets may include Houston, Portland, Milwaukee, Kansas City, Indianapolis, Hartford, Cleveland, Des Moines, Cincinnati, Omaha, Baltimore, Salt Lake City, Seattle, Winnipeg, Hamilton, North York, Laval, Halifax, Quebec City, Victoria, London, Windsor, and Regina/Saskatoon.

Las Vegas, with a 2057 population of about 4.5 million, makes preparations to celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the city's first pro franchise, celebrating the fact that the NHL was the first major league to have the cohones to set up shop there and has been a smashing success ever since. In its first half-century of existence the franchise has already won an impressive six Cups, including back-to-back titles in 2015 and 2016. Vegas is denied a three-peat in 2017 by the Leafs, who end 50 years of frustration by capturing their first Cup since '67.

Gameplay rules are tweaked as time goes by in response to evolutions in the game. Rules changes are suggested and approved by owners, management, players, and fans alike. Equipment is lightweight, thin, but ultra durable and more protective than ever. Protection is malleable and without harmful hardened outter shells.

But the basic elements of the game's rules haven't changed all that much. The league prides itself on having reintroduced offence back into the game, half by accident, half by dumb luck, without ever having changed the size of its rinks or nets. Home ice advantage between teams competing from either side of the Atlantic during the now-worldwide Stanley Cup playoffs is key. Like differently-shaped MLB baseball parks, hockey arenas have differing dimensions, but the NHL and traditional European clubs compete for the Stanley Cup under unified rules which took decades to finally completely and unanimously agree upon.

Obstruction and aggressive stickwork were eventually removed from the game in earnest despite rampant criticism in the first two-and-a-half years of the crackdown, when games averaged upwards of 30 to 40 penalties each, enfuriating purists, confusing fans, and scewing competition. But by Vancouver 2010, the game is showing serious signs of cleaning up. Special teams become less important as players eventually get the message and begin to voluntarily stop clutching and grabbing. It is believed stiffened monetary fines for repeat offenders is what really sunk in with the players most. It is a marvel to many hockey philosophers that no one had to die before the tide turned against thuggery.

By 2010 the goon becomes obsolete and fighting dies a gradual and inevitable death. By 2008, a manditory visor rule is grandfathered in. Skill and speed are unleashed. The Canadiens win their 25th Stanley Cup in 2009 in their 100th season of existence, keeping their unique streak of at least one Cup every decade in tact... barely.

The NHL and IIHF agree to long-term Olympic participation and Vancouver 2010 is a smahing success. The game's popularity finally reaches pre-1994 lockout levels in the States again, as the U.S. national development program set up back in the 1990's begins producing some great players, led by (october) 2006 no.1 overall draft choice Phil Kessel, The American Sydney Crosby. It's all uphill from here for hockey just 5 years after the NHL had hit its lowest point in 2006.

The World/Canada Cup loses meaning and the Olympics are the ultimate in international competition until the World Cup is revamped in time for 2012, when one country anywhere in the world is chosen as the host from now on, like in soccer, freeing the competition from North American bias. The first true World Cup of 2012 is awarded to host Russia, a nation on the rebound, which takes the oportunity to revamp its hockey infrastructure, including a new state-of-the-art 22,000 seat arena in Moscow, built in a record-setting 9 months.

The 2014 olympics are awarded to Austria and Switzerland. Sweden is disappointed but receives the 2016 World Cup jointly with Finland. The NHL celebrates a healthy 100th birthday. The 2018 Olympics return to the Orient, probably Korea. The game's popularity explodes in East Asia and the first true Oriental superstar will eventually emerge later in the 20's.

The 2020 World Cup returns to North America. Hockey is a thriving worldwide sport. The Czechs, Germans, and a joint bid from Latvia & Ukraine all campaign hard to be awarded the 2024 World Cup. By 2025 the first European club team has already won the Stanley Cup, at around which time offensive hockey may be in full bloom and 'The Gretzky-Record-Breaking-Prodigy' may be just entering his/her prime, with his/her team perhaps putting together a Stanley Cup Dynasty that rivals that of 50's Montreal, 70's Montreal, and 80's Edmonton.

2059: Wayne Gretzky passes away peacefully at the age of 99.

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03-21-2005, 09:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katodelder
Hockey in 2055...

Steroids will be better understood and certain forms with beneficial attributes may be used in moderation and in conjunction with a balanced diet to further human physical evolution. The big controversy of the day won't revolve around steroids but perhaps some sort of nanotechnology, and the ethical issues behind melding man and machine. Integrating women and men into mutual competition might be another hot topic of the day, or an issue that has already been tackled.

The Stanley Cup is competed for by NHL teams in North America, traditional club teams in Europe, and as of recently teams from the Orient. The first woman player/coach/GM may or may not have had her name engraved on the Cup by then.

By then a new rebirth of offensive hockey may have already come and gone with the cycle about to shift back to defence again. The trap-based systems of the early 21st century were evntually rendered obsolete by a new genius hockey mind, probably a GM/coach who was fortunate enough to have the greatest hockey talent of the first half-century on his team.

No, not Sidney Crosby, someone else who may not even be born yet, who will be recognized at a very very young age as a supernatural prodigy, who can do things with the puck that we can't even imagine yet. Perhaps being completely ambidextrous, or able to manipulate a puck in 3D space, or displaying an up-to-then unheard of level of consciousness of his teammates' whereabouts and the opposition around him, or being able to fool a goalie unlike no other. Or perhaps it will be identical twin prodigies who work together as if of one single mind to bust up defensive formations. Or perhaps it will be a woman hockey-prodigy?

All in all, he/she and his/her coach could together impact the game to the point where other hockey minds are compelled to mimic them for years to come. By 2055 the new prodigy may already be retired after shattering Gretzky's records, and after having played in a high-scoring era. By 2055, new defensive schemes to thwart the offensive surge may already be on the verge of coming into fashion. Perhaps goalies develop new skills in the constant game of cat and mouse between defence and offence.

Careers of the most fortunate elite athletes may be 25-30 years long now due to medical advances and a 'better living through chemistry' revolution. The greatest advances may be sought in the field of injury recovery and muscle/ligament regeneration. Or perhaps even stem-cell research to help chronic cases. New understanding of the human brain may lead to breakthroughs in the treatment of concussions.

Television is all pervasive. The evolution of reality TV, and the advent of nano-cameras, have raised the level of audience expectation to the point where they demand POV views and expect their athletes to be artciulate and camera savvy, where they also kinda 'act' and must have entertaining, engaging 'TV personalities'. 'Sportainment' may be all the rage as the off-ice lives of mid-21st century athletes are as much a part of the total entertainment 'package' as their on-ice game.

Cameras the size of contact lenses worn by players, and perhaps connected to their nervous systems somehow, broadcast images from their point-of-view to TV audiences who see things as the players do. Human camera operators work remotely or maybe no longer exist at all. Cameras are small self-propelled robots that can give fantastic angles. So as not to obstruct arena spectators, these cameras make use of new cloaking/holographic technology, first developed by the U.S. military and just recently made available for commercial and recreational use.

Spectator capacities in next-generation arenas remain just as big as back in the late 1990's as most important hockey audience revenues are TV-based anyway. The league is long-since removed from its gate-driven days and in-arena audiences top-out at between 20,000 to 25,000. Arena building costs have been greatly reduced by advances in refrigeration. New arenas employing the superior 'bubble' shape replace the traditional box-shaped edifices as being more economical and environmentally friendly. Bubble-arena walls could have the ability to become either opaque or transparent. The NHL under a starry sky?

Travel costs and fatigue have been greatly reduced due to the popularization of trans-continental magnetic levitation monorails, which rival planes in speed, and are deemed more environmental and safer overall. Supersonic Jet lag research is making strides in reducing the disruptive effects of trans-oceanic, high-altitude flights from New York to London to Tokyo, so as to optimize athletic output.

Each continent has a league with centralized ownership, but the free market ensures that player salaries are gradually and forever on the rise as revenues continue to grow. The league is economically healthy but Unions perhaps still exist and the cycle of periodic labour strife continues and is perpetual and inevitable. However new forms of advanced business negotiations are in place to avoid lengthy work stoppages and the stoppages that do arise are brief and handled more efficiently.

A better-educated fanbase accepts the business side of things and no longer blows labour conflicts out of proportion. All players might have a stake in team ownership to some extent and own team stocks, blurring the line between emplyoee and employer to avoid worker resentment. Now a distant memory, sport business university students of 2055 laugh at the personal nature that the 'ancient' and 'primitive' lockout of 2005 took, since deemed an unecessary and very much illogical clash of human egos that almost sunk the league in 2006, and went against the prime business objective -- a detriment to the bottom line: profit margin.

The North American NHL has since expanded to 48 teams by now. 6 solid 8-team divisions with intense intra-divisional rivalries and imbalanced, division-heavy schedules. Such 'new' markets may include Houston, Portland, Milwaukee, Kansas City, Indianapolis, Hartford, Cleveland, Des Moines, Cincinnati, Omaha, Baltimore, Salt Lake City, Seattle, Winnipeg, Hamilton, North York, Laval, Halifax, Quebec City, Victoria, London, Windsor, and Regina/Saskatoon.

Las Vegas, with a 2057 population of about 4.5 million, makes preparations to celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the city's first pro franchise, celebrating the fact that the NHL was the first major league to have the cohones to set up shop there and has been a smashing success ever since. In its first half-century of existence the franchise has already won an impressive six Cups, including back-to-back titles in 2015 and 2016. Vegas is denied a three-peat in 2017 by the Leafs, who end 50 years of frustration by capturing their first Cup since '67.

Gameplay rules are tweaked as time goes by in response to evolutions in the game. Rules changes are suggested and approved by owners, management, players, and fans alike. Equipment is lightweight, thin, but ultra durable and more protective than ever. Protection is malleable and without harmful hardened outter shells.

But the basic elements of the game's rules haven't changed all that much. The league prides itself on having reintroduced offence back into the game, half by accident, half by dumb luck, without ever having changed the size of its rinks or nets. Home ice advantage between teams competing from either side of the Atlantic during the now-worldwide Stanley Cup playoffs is key. Like differently-shaped MLB baseball parks, hockey arenas have differing dimensions, but the NHL and traditional European clubs compete for the Stanley Cup under unified rules which took decades to finally completely and unanimously agree upon.

Obstruction and aggressive stickwork were eventually removed from the game in earnest despite rampant criticism in the first two-and-a-half years of the crackdown, when games averaged upwards of 30 to 40 penalties each, enfuriating purists, confusing fans, and scewing competition. But by Vancouver 2010, the game is showing serious signs of cleaning up. Special teams become less important as players eventually get the message and begin to voluntarily stop clutching and grabbing. It is believed stiffened monetary fines for repeat offenders is what really sunk in with the players most. It is a marvel to many hockey philosophers that no one had to die before the tide turned against thuggery.

By 2010 the goon becomes obsolete and fighting dies a gradual and inevitable death. By 2008, a manditory visor rule is grandfathered in. Skill and speed are unleashed. The Canadiens win their 25th Stanley Cup in 2009 in their 100th season of existence, keeping their unique streak of at least one Cup every decade in tact... barely.

The NHL and IIHF agree to long-term Olympic participation and Vancouver 2010 is a smahing success. The game's popularity finally reaches pre-1994 lockout levels in the States again, as the U.S. national development program set up back in the 1990's begins producing some great players, led by (october) 2006 no.1 overall draft choice Phil Kessel, The American Sydney Crosby. It's all uphill from here for hockey just 5 years after the NHL had hit its lowest point in 2006.

The World/Canada Cup loses meaning and the Olympics are the ultimate in international competition until the World Cup is revamped in time for 2012, when one country anywhere in the world is chosen as the host from now on, like in soccer, freeing the competition from North American bias. The first true World Cup of 2012 is awarded to host Russia, a nation on the rebound, which takes the oportunity to revamp its hockey infrastructure, including a new state-of-the-art 22,000 seat arena in Moscow, built in a record-setting 9 months.

The 2014 olympics are awarded to Austria and Switzerland. Sweden is disappointed but receives the 2016 World Cup jointly with Finland. The NHL celebrates a healthy 100th birthday. The 2018 Olympics return to the Orient, probably Korea. The game's popularity explodes in East Asia and the first true Oriental superstar will eventually emerge later in the 20's.

The 2020 World Cup returns to North America. Hockey is a thriving worldwide sport. The Czechs, Germans, and a joint bid from Latvia & Ukraine all campaign hard to be awarded the 2024 World Cup. By 2025 the first European club team has already won the Stanley Cup, at around which time offensive hockey may be in full bloom and 'The Gretzky-Record-Breaking-Prodigy' may be just entering his/her prime, with his/her team perhaps putting together a Stanley Cup Dynasty that rivals that of 50's Montreal, 70's Montreal, and 80's Edmonton.

2059: Wayne Gretzky passes away peacefully at the age of 99.

The only thing that's wrong, is that Gretzky won't be 99 until 2060. He's born in 61'.

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03-21-2005, 09:28 AM
  #8
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Hockey in 2055...
A bit too anniversary-happy, but an impressive scenario and a nice finishing touch. One can only hope that the world, let alone the NHL, is in a state to accomodate such success.

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03-21-2005, 09:47 AM
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Oh, one more thing. One huge future advancement in sports is already on the horizon, in the form of LED lighting. Some people feel it will have replaced the lightbulb in five years. This will be a really dramatic change, by the way. Our visual perception of objects under light is very much affected by the source of illumination. Your living room will look very different under LED. I definitely think we'll see the first all-LED arenas by 2055.

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03-21-2005, 10:00 AM
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Great thread!

50 years is a long time, so I think you'll see many changes.

The one bold prediction I will make is that the NHL will be structured around 3 separate divisions:
NHL North America
NHL Europe
NHL Asia

The idea of a European conference is not to hard to conceive. Asia's a different one altogether, however, with the growth of that region, in 50 years, that region will be the economic powerhouse, and the NHL would be foolish to not try and get their hooks in there somehow.

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03-21-2005, 10:14 AM
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by discostu
Asia's a different one altogether, however, with the growth of that region, in 50 years, that region will be the economic powerhouse
Are you kidding? The way things are going now, they'll be the world's economic powerhouse by the end of this year. I thought Joss Whedon was joking when he had all of his characters speaking Chinese in Firefly, but now the scenario looks eerily prescient.

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03-21-2005, 09:43 PM
  #12
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(((Las Vegas, with a 2057 population of about 4.5 million, makes preparations to celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the city's first pro franchise, celebrating the fact that the NHL was the first major league to have the cohones to set up shop there and has been a smashing success ever since. In its first half-century of existence the franchise has already won an impressive six Cups, including back-to-back titles in 2015 and 2016. Vegas is denied a three-peat in 2017 by the Leafs, who end 50 years of frustration by capturing their first Cup since '67. )))

katodelder.........

That was one hell of a post.....EXCELLENT!....I can see alot of the things happening the way that you've outlined......and even though I am a Leafs fan it wouldn't surprise me one bit if it took the Leafs a few more years before they recapture Lord Stanley's Mug......I truely enjoyed reading your post.

Thanks!

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03-21-2005, 10:44 PM
  #13
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great post katodelder, the only prediction i have is that superstar players will start showing up all over the world (Austraila, Africa, South America etc)

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03-21-2005, 11:44 PM
  #14
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I predict ten years form now you'll see protective gear as we now it change completely.

In England, I think, they've created a clothe, just like a normal coton shirt, that is completely malleable, until high impact. At that point it hardens like plastic. It's already incorporated in some skate shoes in really small amounts. That should really have a big effect on hockey. Equipment will be much lighter, smaller and allow more freedom in movement.

Here's a link :

Intelligent material


Last edited by One Less Louise: 03-21-2005 at 11:58 PM.
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03-22-2005, 03:58 AM
  #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E = CH²
I predict ten years form now you'll see protective gear as we now it change completely.

In England, I think, they've created a clothe, just like a normal coton shirt, that is completely malleable, until high impact. At that point it hardens like plastic. It's already incorporated in some skate shoes in really small amounts. That should really have a big effect on hockey. Equipment will be much lighter, smaller and allow more freedom in movement.

Here's a link :

Intelligent material
Wow, I want to be the first one on my block with a t-shirt of this stuff... "punch me in the gut".

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Old
03-22-2005, 11:16 AM
  #16
One Less Louise
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Paxon
Wow, I want to be the first one on my block with a t-shirt of this stuff... "punch me in the gut".
Are you a businessman ? Those shirts would sell like hot cakes I tell ya !

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Old
03-24-2005, 06:57 AM
  #17
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Probably still locked oot...

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03-24-2005, 10:54 AM
  #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katodelder
Hockey in 2055...

The 2014 olympics are awarded to Austria and Switzerland. Sweden is disappointed but receives the 2016 World Cup jointly with Finland. The NHL celebrates a healthy 100th birthday. The 2018 Olympics return to the Orient, probably Korea. The game's popularity explodes in East Asia and the first true Oriental superstar will eventually emerge later in the 20's.
the only problem with your whole scenario, heres a quick olympics bid 101.....

2012 is going to Europe, New York is just way to far behind. Because 2012 is going to Europe, all Europe bids for 2014 will be weakened. 2010 Vancouver barely won, having lost the first round to Korea (and Austria being soundly trounced because of Torino 2006), and then eeked out a 3 vote win in the second round. With 2008 set to be a huge MASSIVE success for China(barring any Taiwan problems), 2014 is going to Asia, no doubts about it. My money is on Harbin, with the IOC wanting to get even more cash with a China Olympics. Also Switzerland has already said there not bidding for 2014 and the Finland clause is one the IOC will never allow, thus trouncing any joint-country bids. 2018 will return to Europe though, with a 2016 North American win(Toronto anyone?)....

Otherwise, EXCELLENT post!!!! I enjoyed it alot...

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03-24-2005, 12:28 PM
  #19
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I'm not so sure hockey will take off around the world even 50 years from now. I mean, it certainly could, but how many people even 30 years ago felt soccer would take off in north america?

Another thing to remember is that unless the third world catches up to the first world in terms of economic strength and wealth, hockey will simply be a much too expensive sport to be played anywhere other than the global West and a few other countries. China may develop, and they have a bit of a history of hockey, so in 30-50 years I can see them being a hockey powerhouse, but countries in Latin America or South East Asia? The general wealth distribution around the world has remained relatively the same for the last few centuries, and depressing as it is for me to admit it, it's probably not going to change in the next 50 years.


The reason basketball is taking off in popularity around the world is a) because of the marketing of the NBA, but more importantly I think, it's b) because it's relatively cheap to play once you have a net or two, and those can even be hand made if you're desperate enough. It's one advantage hockey will never have. Ice time and equipment will always be expensive.

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03-31-2005, 12:15 AM
  #20
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Looks like the future of hockey is about to change some more with the latest talk of NHL possibly using LARGER NETS......

Players, GM give thumbs down to talk of bigger nets


"I don't really care because my net is not going to be bigger than somebody else," Brodeur said. "If it's fair for everyone, that's fine. I'm pretty tall, I'll be all right. Just if you're not six-foot tall, you can't play (goalie) anymore."


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03-31-2005, 12:21 AM
  #21
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I'll be still surfing the Hockey's Future website but through a chip implant (attached to some bodily nerve) while I hobble around in an old age home in search of some plastic surgeried old resident to get jiggy with. She'll ask me to turn off the hockey game during and I'll say sure, but I won't.

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03-31-2005, 10:13 PM
  #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander
I'll be still surfing the Hockey's Future website but through a chip implant (attached to some bodily nerve) while I hobble around in an old age home in search of some plastic surgeried old resident to get jiggy with. She'll ask me to turn off the hockey game during and I'll say sure, but I won't.
Ya I can see something like that happening........and even Virtyal Reality.....put on a set of goggles and gloves from the comfort of your own Living room and experience the Hockey game as if you were there LIVE at the Arena.

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