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How do you "shake it off?"

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Old
07-22-2010, 11:26 PM
  #1
The Spicy Shrimp
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How do you "shake it off?"

I'm new to hockey. I've never played an organized game, and at the moment I'm taking a learn to play class that focuses on the basics (stickhandling, passing, proper skating, etc.). There are a lot of 1 on 1 drills, and usually I do alright, but this past week, I spent almost the entire class getting beaten. Almost everyone got by me when I was on defense, and I got the puck knocked off my stick too much when I was on offense. I try not to let it get to me, but obviously I'm still thinking about it. How do you more experienced players shake off bad moments and focus on doing better next time? Is there some trick or just a state of mind?

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07-22-2010, 11:39 PM
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blueberrydanish
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Take it for what it is, a learning experience. I dont really try and forget a mistake I make, I try to break it down and think about what all I coulda/shoulda done. That always turns it into a positive in the end, although at first you just think about how dumb of a move you made lol.

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07-22-2010, 11:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Spicy Shrimp View Post
I'm new to hockey. I've never played an organized game, and at the moment I'm taking a learn to play class that focuses on the basics (stickhandling, passing, proper skating, etc.). There are a lot of 1 on 1 drills, and usually I do alright, but this past week, I spent almost the entire class getting beaten. Almost everyone got by me when I was on defense, and I got the puck knocked off my stick too much when I was on offense. I try not to let it get to me, but obviously I'm still thinking about it. How do you more experienced players shake off bad moments and focus on doing better next time? Is there some trick or just a state of mind?
Just a state of mind, I think. Easiest way to shake off the frustration of not progressing how you want to is to step away from the game for a couple days and then come back to it with the mindset that you are doing it to enjoy it. It's great to work out when you're pissed, but terrible to practice when you're mad IMO.

Bobby Orr got beat when he was learning the game. I'm sure Wayne Gretzky played against D-men that had his number when he was new to the game. I wouldn't sweat it man, being good at hockey just isn't that important. Enjoying what we do with whatever leisure time we can get kind of is though.

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07-23-2010, 12:56 AM
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Razzmatazz
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Stay focused, even if you don't make the play, or turn the puck over, understanding WHY it happened is the first step to reducing the turnovers in that situation. Eventually, you'll get a better feel of where you need to keep and move the puck to keep it out of the range of a stick check, such as bodying off the defender and such...take chances, especially, don't try to be perfect, mistakes are good. How did I become a better skater? Falling down, a LOT! The best way to become better controlling the puck in traffic? Go straight into it.

Defense when you are first learning is very tough for everyone, don't let that bother you too much, I still struggle going backwards against the rush. When you get more confident, I recommend you try playing in a higher level pickup match...the players tend to get scoring happy, you'll get some time at the blue line, trust me. You won't beat the rush, you'll get burned every time, but when you go back to the beginner level, the beginner forwards will be slower than watching grass grow.

From personal experience, I went in wanting to score 3 goals a night...and I struggled and was really frustrated during my first few games. Don't force yourself...I didn't get a point for my first 4 games, falling down, losing the puck, getting pretty frustrated...the 5th game, I relaxed a little and didn't try to do everything myself...and scored 2 goals and an assist.


Last edited by Razzmatazz: 07-23-2010 at 01:20 AM.
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07-23-2010, 02:05 AM
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Work on skating. Skating. S-K-A-T-I-N-G!!! If you're getting beat everytime one on one, practice your skating. Forwards and backwards. If you're just beginning to learn hockey, you should be taking a beginner's learn-to-skate class or beginner's power skating class. You shouldn't be messing around with pucks and one on one drills yet. All skating.

Oh. And as for shaking it off... it sounds like the class could be a little above your skill level??? Regardless, your going to have growing pains with hockey as with anything else. Good luck!

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07-23-2010, 04:58 AM
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I'm still new to the game (been playing 6 months now more or less), but I'm the kind of person that likes to make mistakes...because I never try to make those same mistakes again.

Sure I'll still make a stupid pass or not cover my man, but in games where I could have done this and done that instead...I know better the second time and I've really improved.

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07-23-2010, 06:17 AM
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Gino 14
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The best advise was already given, work on your skating. Any time you get a chance to get on the ice, use it, open skates, stick practice, what ever. Don't get frustrated, it's part of the process. Also, always keep moving so you don't get caught flat footed.

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07-23-2010, 08:45 AM
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Jarick
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My first year of league I was always getting the puck picked off my stick. I learned that I carried it too far in front of me and waited too long to make a move. That summer, I played a lot of pickup and worked on carrying the puck closer to my body (shorter stick), making moves earlier, and taking the puck wide and skating around the defender.

Eventually, it got to the point I do it out of habit, and now I use a ridiculously long stick and can stickhandle around most guys at my level.

To the "skate it off" topic, I visualize the situation and what I would have done differently enough times until I feel I've learned from my mistake, then I forget about it. Have a beer, relax, and focus on something else. It's important to revisit those mistakes, but don't get frustrated about them, visualize yourself making the correct decision. It's powerful stuff.

Edit: I meant "shake it off" "Skate it off" is what we say (somewhat jokingly) whenever anyone gets hurt. For example, my buddy fractured his leg, so he could either go to the doctor, or just lace 'em up and skate it off.

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07-23-2010, 09:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Spicy Shrimp View Post
I'm new to hockey. I've never played an organized game, and at the moment I'm taking a learn to play class that focuses on the basics (stickhandling, passing, proper skating, etc.). There are a lot of 1 on 1 drills, and usually I do alright, but this past week, I spent almost the entire class getting beaten. Almost everyone got by me when I was on defense, and I got the puck knocked off my stick too much when I was on offense. I try not to let it get to me, but obviously I'm still thinking about it. How do you more experienced players shake off bad moments and focus on doing better next time? Is there some trick or just a state of mind?
Don't, agony is your best friend!

Hockey is such a extreme multifacet sport, always focus on what you do and try to do it better.

In many sports there are "prototypes", you are successful if you are built a certain way basically. Look like at a hockeyteam, there are all kind of bodys on it. Who become successful? What seperates kids from each other? I think its about being able to learn fast, there is so much you must pickup.

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07-23-2010, 09:05 AM
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Razzmatazz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Eventually, it got to the point I do it out of habit, and now I use a ridiculously long stick and can stickhandle around most guys at my level.
That reminds me...I started playing with a really long stick at first, but for this next season coming up in a few weeks, which after a couple years off, will be kind of like a new start, I bought a new stick and cut it short by a couple inches shorter than I'm used to.

The reason why, is that with the long stick, I would just try to use my reach instead of utilizing my skates and body...I was cheating and playing a little bit lazier...with the short stick, I'll have to use my feet to add range and keep myself from leaning off balance at a puck out of my reach.

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07-23-2010, 09:09 AM
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Just take what you can from it, and use that to make yourself better!

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07-23-2010, 09:23 AM
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PuckHogs29
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You gotta remember it's practice, and everyone has a crappy practice now and then. It happens. You just gotta realize it and say wow I just don't have it tonight, keep giving it everything you've got and come back the next time ready to go again. Learn from your mistakes and see if you can react differently next time. Hockey's not a game that can be picked up overnight. And it's always evolving and you're always learning. There are professionals that have played for 20 years who still need coaches and who still learn things. So don't let it bug you.

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07-23-2010, 09:47 AM
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Jarick
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Here's kind of my timeline for stick length:

2005 - eyebrows in skates
2006 - nose in skates
2007 - mouth in skates
2008 - chin in skates
2009 - under chin in skates
2010 - back up to nose in skates

The reason is my stickhandling improved to the point that the longer stick doesn't negatively impact it, plus I got moved on defense last fall, and the longer stick helps with poke checks.

I also thought a shorter stick would help with getting shots off quicker, but it was the opposite as I would need to pull the puck into my wheelhouse to get any meat on the shot.

Not that it matters, I always experiment and it's all personal preference.

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07-23-2010, 11:50 AM
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AZcoyotes
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Well when I get mad, at my self or somone else, I make a usuly normal body bump, a huge, Bone jaring hit.

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07-23-2010, 12:34 PM
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I've had a few bad games in a row. Try not to let it get to you. Ultimately, it's all a learning experience, albeit not exactly a fun one.

I had some of the higher talent people skating around me or I'd get stopped carrying the puck. Just have to keep doing it though. Eventually you'll learn and get better.

It's difficult to describe other than just 'keep at it'.

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07-23-2010, 01:25 PM
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Jive Time
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I agree with the others: make skating a premium.

Channel your dissatisfaction into being productive. Pick one thing to improve on and work on it till you are seeing the results you expect.

Also, hang on to the puck for a few seconds and don't worry about it getting swiped. Eventually your possession will improve and you will cut down on the panic passes.

my 2 cents.

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07-23-2010, 04:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lario Melieux View Post
Work on skating. Skating. S-K-A-T-I-N-G!!! If you're getting beat everytime one on one, practice your skating. Forwards and backwards. If you're just beginning to learn hockey, you should be taking a beginner's learn-to-skate class or beginner's power skating class. You shouldn't be messing around with pucks and one on one drills yet. All skating.

Oh. And as for shaking it off... it sounds like the class could be a little above your skill level??? Regardless, your going to have growing pains with hockey as with anything else. Good luck!
This. I am new to the game and am taking an adult clinic. This week the coach had us doing one on one's. I was in the line to play defense and it was obvious to the coach I was in over my head as soon as he saw me try to defend a more experienced forward. He pulled me out and had me work with one of the assistant coaches. He showed me what he wanted me to do - a skating drill - and said "do this about 8,000 times".

It was fine with me. It was better use of my time and better use of the other players time, too.

You just tell yourself it's going to take time and effort to learn. Everyone went through it at some point. My goal is to see some improvement in at least one aspect of my skating, however small, each time I leave the ice.

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07-23-2010, 05:59 PM
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The Spicy Shrimp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lario Melieux View Post
Work on skating. Skating. S-K-A-T-I-N-G!!! If you're getting beat everytime one on one, practice your skating. Forwards and backwards. If you're just beginning to learn hockey, you should be taking a beginner's learn-to-skate class or beginner's power skating class. You shouldn't be messing around with pucks and one on one drills yet. All skating.

Oh. And as for shaking it off... it sounds like the class could be a little above your skill level??? Regardless, your going to have growing pains with hockey as with anything else. Good luck!
Yeah, I took a learn to skate class, and from the description, the class I'm in sounded like it would focus on power skating a bit more than it actually does. They try to group people by experience so that everyone is at the same level. Usually I'm right on par with everyone else in the "less experienced" group; I guess I just had a terrible day.

Thanks to everyone who chimed in!

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07-23-2010, 06:17 PM
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if your a goal scorer and your at a dry spell just remember a saying, "when goals come they come in bunches" and if you make a mistake dont waste time being mad at yourself, swallow hard and get back in the play and play your game (dont be ruled by emotion)

Also, a mistake because of lack of skill is way more understandable then a mistake because of lack of effort....skate hard, dont ever give up, and have some fun.

Talk about the game with your teammates after the game. It will make you a better player and it will make your linemates understand your thought process so they can better predict how you work on the ice and your team will work more as a unit.

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07-23-2010, 10:10 PM
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SERE 24
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There is only one correct answer to this:

The only way to play your best hockey is to NOT think at all while playing and be completely enveloped in the moment. Organically react to what's going on around you and act in the moment as if you, the puck, the ice, your stick... everything, is all an extension of one another. Trying to think about what to do on each drill or play is futile. The more you devote to "making a decision" for a move or a maneuver... the less in the moment you are, the less likely you are to succeed.

In that same vein, don't think about it after it happens. The moment has passed. Focus on the next drill or play BEFORE it happens, visualize what you might want to do, visualize yourself actually doing it and get the thinking about it over with BEFORE it happens. When you go up again for the next drill, don't think at all.

I've been playing hockey for 19 years (I'm almost 24) and I played 4 years of NCAA DI hockey. Whenever I talk about the concept of trying to clear my mind and not worry or stress about every day things I find myself saying that I simply can't; that my mind is too active and that I can't help but think about things that are stressing me out, etc. I've come to realize that there is ONE time in my life when I am NEVER thinking and that is when I'm on the ice. My hockey playing is completely reactionary and instinctive.

You shake it off by hardly acknowledging it.

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07-23-2010, 10:58 PM
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Never get frustrated, that's the main thing.

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07-23-2010, 11:26 PM
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Originally Posted by Zetterqvist24 View Post
There is only one correct answer to this:

The only way to play your best hockey is to NOT think at all while playing and be completely enveloped in the moment. Organically react to what's going on around you and act in the moment as if you, the puck, the ice, your stick... everything, is all an extension of one another. Trying to think about what to do on each drill or play is futile. The more you devote to "making a decision" for a move or a maneuver... the less in the moment you are, the less likely you are to succeed.

In that same vein, don't think about it after it happens. The moment has passed. Focus on the next drill or play BEFORE it happens, visualize what you might want to do, visualize yourself actually doing it and get the thinking about it over with BEFORE it happens. When you go up again for the next drill, don't think at all.

I've been playing hockey for 19 years (I'm almost 24) and I played 4 years of NCAA DI hockey. Whenever I talk about the concept of trying to clear my mind and not worry or stress about every day things I find myself saying that I simply can't; that my mind is too active and that I can't help but think about things that are stressing me out, etc. I've come to realize that there is ONE time in my life when I am NEVER thinking and that is when I'm on the ice. My hockey playing is completely reactionary and instinctive.

You shake it off by hardly acknowledging it.
Visualizing a play/drill is definitely important... but the part you said about not thinking and going on instincts.... I think that may not be good advice for a beginner and just a result of your hockey sense from playing 19 years.... that can't be taught or learned... just comes from playing a long time.

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07-24-2010, 03:45 AM
  #23
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One thing that's important to remember is that improving your game is a slow and steady process. You will not notice a significant difference after a small amount of practice, but practice a lot over a long period of time and you will improve, slowly but surely. This is especially true if you focus on your weaknesses - for example, if you cross over well one way, but not so well the other way, work on your weak side until it's roughly as good as your strong side!

Also, just have fun! Everyone has days where they get beat, it's not a big deal. As long as you're trying hard and making the odd good play you can have a really good time, even when you screw up.

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07-24-2010, 05:36 AM
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It's simple: You suck.


But that's okay, because you only suck now. Everyone sucks when they start, and if some people are faster learners than you, don't worry about it, go at your own pace.

The best way to go about it is make sure you are doing the technical things right. The way you hold your stick, where the puck is on your blade before you shoot it, your follow through. Make sure the technical parts are right and then just practice.

The reason the technical parts have to be right is because you don't want to accidentally practice something incorrect. Just make sure your form is good in whatever you're attempting, a shot, a check whatever.

Just some random tips:

On defense, keep your eye on the puck when you try to strip them of it. Don't get distracted by their feet or stick. Trying to read their movements is how you get deked out. Just look for the puck and attack it at all costs.

On offense, look where you want the puck to go as you shoot. When starting out I often looked at the puck and my stick instead of where I was shooting. It's good to glance so you know where they both are but during the shot you should be looking at where you are aiming.

Stick with it and pick your stick up every day. Even if you're just going to mess around and deke by yourself in the garage when nobody is looking. The more you practice arbitrarily like this the more natural things become and the better you'll be.

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07-24-2010, 10:23 AM
  #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueberrydanish View Post
Take it for what it is, a learning experience. I dont really try and forget a mistake I make, I try to break it down and think about what all I coulda/shoulda done. That always turns it into a positive in the end, although at first you just think about how dumb of a move you made lol.
Theres nothing more to be said! Its just a game and the same exact pass or play will happen 1000 more. Learn from it and move on!!

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