HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > Hockey Talk by Country > Central Europe
Central Europe Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland, Hungary, Italy

Talent dries up in Czech Republic, Slovakia

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
08-25-2010, 10:26 AM
  #1
Kamzik
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Country: Slovakia
Posts: 1,487
vCash: 500
Talent dries up in Czech Republic, Slovakia

Article in the Canadian newspaper the Globe and Mail:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/sport...rticle1684207/

and from the IIHF:

http://www.iihf.com/de/home-of-hocke...ash=67e4dc7931


Anyhow, is this the truth? Is it an exaggeration?

Kamzik is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-25-2010, 05:06 PM
  #2
smitty10
Registered User
 
smitty10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Toronto
Country: Canada
Posts: 7,068
vCash: 500
It is true that they aren't producing as many quality players, but they are still producing talent. In upcoming drafts they have a few first rounders in Musil, Frk and Jurco, with possibly a few more guys going in the late first and second rounds. Also don't forget about guys like Straka, Marincin, Culek and Gudas who all look promising.

smitty10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-25-2010, 11:28 PM
  #3
Harv
R.I.P. Pavol.
 
Harv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Country: Slovakia
Posts: 5,510
vCash: 500
Article title is very misleading.

It makes it sound there are no more above average players coming out of CZH or SVK. When all they're really saying is that the top players are leaving for Canadian Jr. teams.

People are alarmed because there isn't a great amount of Slovak or Czech in the NHL systems now. But the fact of the matter is that its happening to every Euro country. Teams aren't wasting their time on Euro players unless they are big time impact players because they can just get Canadian or American players to do the same jobs as a 3rd and 4th line player for the same or less money.

The Jr. systems in North America have also come a long way in the last 15 years, meaning more and more NHL caliber players and leaving the Euro player at home.

Harv is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-26-2010, 02:27 AM
  #4
alko
Registered User
 
alko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Slovakia
Country: Slovakia
Posts: 1,754
vCash: 500
i dont see it so critical

Ok, its true, that we lost our position (Slovakia) comparing to end 1990s and begin 2000s...

But look to the NHL statistics from begin 1990s
1992/1993 - 5 Slovak players
1993/1994 - 10 (only 3 with more that 50 games!)
1994/1995 - 8
1995/1996 - 10 (again, only 6 with 50 games and more)
1996/1997 - 8
1997/1998 - 13
.
.
.

Last season it was 18 (2 goalies), this season it could be again around this number .

many peaple sais, that the time from the year 1989 (end of comunists) offered more quality...
but my question is - why were in the begin of 1990s so few Slovaks in NHL?

alko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-26-2010, 10:37 AM
  #5
Swipes
Registered User
 
Swipes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Country: Czech_ Republic
Posts: 516
vCash: 200
The talent hasn't dried up, it's drying up. The issues are of course many:

1) Hockey is an expensive sport, so the children of much less wealthy parents choose football.

2) The children of rich parents play on line 1 regardless of whether they are the best players or not (because the rich parents pay considerable sums of money to the management or coaches to ensure their son gets the most ice time) This of course results in the more talented players getting drowned in lines 3 and 4, getting frustrated and giving up playing hockey all together.

I read about a coach who coached juniors in a club and decided to give the most talented players the most ice time. He was called into the the managers office. The manager proceeded to strike through certain players that were to play in one of the games and pencilled in a few other ones whilst saying stuff like "This kid's dad gives the club a lot of money", "I promised this dad his kid would play line 1" etc, you get the idea.
The coach of course refused, and the next day he was coaching the next level below the juniors (starsi dorost)

3) The fact that nobody bothers to do anything properly, i.e. fitness training and other aspects-like 'stress tests' I'm not sure this is the correct translation of "zátěžových testů"- where most of the coaches have no idea what any of the numbers mean.

4) The fact that there is little care for finishing school and having some form of decent education, so that if you don't go pro in hockey you have another means of making a living (e.g. around February this year it was discovered that 17 out of 20 of the U-17 National Team had failed the year! If they can't apply themselves to school, it is unlikely they can do so for hockey.)

5) The youth in the czech republic is far more interested in having a bit of fun than being properly disciplined (e.g. Ivan Hlinka Memorial Tournament, 3 guys were thrown of the team for pissing about with tobacco and messing up the walls in the hotel they were staying at. Other examples include the whole U-18 getting totally smashed before last years WC to the point where Daniel Krejci turned up to the National team's traning totally pissed)

The problems are many, but can be solved. Like Lener has said, checking up on whether the coaches are doing what they should be doing and not what they like, will be the key factor in moving things forward to a good level.

Swipes is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:35 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2014 All Rights Reserved.