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Stopping on right side

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08-27-2010, 12:07 AM
  #1
Defgarden
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Stopping on right side

Hi guys,

I started up a skating class (hockey skills), and learned a bunch of neat things on my first class. Kinda nice to get some tips after trying to learn on my own. Anyways, I can comfortably do a snowplow stop on my left skate inside edge, and can even turn my whole body sideways with both skates to come to a stop (not quite a hockey stop, but close). The thing is, I can't seem to do it on my right side. Even just trying to snowplow is difficult. I try and try, but it just doesn't seem to work the same way. Any ideas on how to break this slump and stop on my right side?

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08-27-2010, 12:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Defgarden View Post
Hi guys,

I started up a skating class (hockey skills), and learned a bunch of neat things on my first class. Kinda nice to get some tips after trying to learn on my own. Anyways, I can comfortably do a snowplow stop on my left skate inside edge, and can even turn my whole body sideways with both skates to come to a stop (not quite a hockey stop, but close). The thing is, I can't seem to do it on my right side. Even just trying to snowplow is difficult. I try and try, but it just doesn't seem to work the same way. Any ideas on how to break this slump and stop on my right side?

Can completely feel your pain. I started skating after 15 years (i'll be 31 in a month) and took an adult camp at the beginning of the summer. EVERYONE in the camp had taken the camp before, played in B or A leagues and I felt like a FOOL. I could barely stand up the first night. Second night I finally got my legs back, albeit slowly and VERY humbly (word?).

Got my left side (weak side ironically) hockey stop on the 3rd night, and for the life of me I_COULD_NOT stop on my right side. I TRIED so hard that I actually hurt my leg. Felt like I was pushing so hard that i was bending my knee sideways. Decided to give it a break and just work on other skills and see what happened.

Long story short, I basically through the rest of the 12 weeks, was only stopping on my left side. Got my perfect hockey stop back, skating was perfect again, and was able to start working on my stickhandling and shooting (more humble pie). 2nd to the last week of camp, I decided to go to an open stick (basically like open hockey, but you bring your own pucks and just skate around and shoot/pass/drills, etc whatever you want to do) and all of a sudden (honestly, I didn't even realize it after I had done it 3 times) I was stopping on my right side. Turns out I had given up on thinking about it so hard, that it just happened on its own. Hard to believe I know, but it just did. Now I don't even have to think about it.

Might work for you, might not. May have been a fluke for me due to the fact that I skated for 10 years when I was younger, but I'd say just use what you have now. It SHOULD happen naturally, and I THINK that if you keep trying too hard, it's not going to happen.

Good luck man!

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08-27-2010, 12:17 AM
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The Spicy Shrimp
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I have the same problem. It's extremely irritating. Whenever I even try to stop right, I just end up turning left. It's all edge related. Getting comfortable on all four takes some doing. I've been skating for almost a year and I'm just now getting comfortable crossing left over right. I found that a skating drill where you simply walk sideways helps a lot in mastering all your edges, as does learning a crossover start going both ways.

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08-27-2010, 12:21 AM
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Originally Posted by The Spicy Shrimp View Post
I have the same problem. It's extremely irritating. Whenever I even try to stop right, I just end up turning left. It's all edge related. Getting comfortable on all four takes some doing. I've been skating for almost a year and I'm just now getting comfortable crossing left over right. I found that a skating drill where you simply walk sideways helps a lot in mastering all your edges, as does learning a crossover start going both ways.

Also helps (didn't help me) to stand up facing the boards at the bench and kind of hold yourself up and "slide" your front foot so it's barely touching the ice. that's how you SHOULD be stopping. But I know personally, I was putting way too much weight on my front foot, which was just causing the edge to dig in and destroy me. Standing against the boards I have seen for a few people, helps you FEEL the way it should feel when you stop, albeit in a smooth and controlled situation.

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08-27-2010, 12:33 AM
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I still stop better on my left foot, but if you bend ur knees enough and lift up with ur toes and then do the stop on ur right skate might work better.

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08-27-2010, 04:31 AM
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I had a lot of problems stopping on one side when I first started skating. Unfortunately I didn't find any tricks or tips that helped, it just took a whole lot of practice to finally figure it out. But once it clicked for me I haven't had any problems with that side since (I actually don't even remember which side it was). You'll get there, just keep working on it.

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08-27-2010, 08:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Defgarden View Post
Hi guys,

I started up a skating class (hockey skills), and learned a bunch of neat things on my first class. Kinda nice to get some tips after trying to learn on my own. Anyways, I can comfortably do a snowplow stop on my left skate inside edge, and can even turn my whole body sideways with both skates to come to a stop (not quite a hockey stop, but close). The thing is, I can't seem to do it on my right side. Even just trying to snowplow is difficult. I try and try, but it just doesn't seem to work the same way. Any ideas on how to break this slump and stop on my right side?
Assuming there are no pre-existing injuries then you should be able to learn.

Ask one of the instructors to watch you and they should be able to spot the flaw in your technique.

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08-27-2010, 09:21 AM
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While it is of some importance, don't put this as the #1 thing to invest your hockey time on. Consider it one of several flaws to gradually strengthen.

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08-27-2010, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by donGjohnson View Post
While it is of some importance, don't put this as the #1 thing to invest your hockey time on. Consider it one of several flaws to gradually strengthen.
^^
Im a really good skater for the amount of time Ive been skating, and my right outside for crossovers isn't nearly as stable as my left, but its getting there slowly. All you can do is just get out there and skate skate. Right now I can do them and not have issues, but I definitely notice Im not as stable as on the otherside.

Just get out there and keep workin on it.

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08-27-2010, 10:31 AM
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Dump and Chase
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While it is of some importance, don't put this as the #1 thing to invest your hockey time on. Consider it one of several flaws to gradually strengthen.

Having the ability to properly stop is of great importance IMO.


When learning you will feel the G's trying to pull you over the top of your skates. Lean in the opposite direction of the stop (or back toward the direction you just came from) then squat into the stop to absorb your forward momentum.


You can practice that on dry land if you want to get used to the feel. Get up to jogging speed then turn sideways and stop. To keep from stepping over you will need to bend your knees and lean away from the stop. Think of your body as a spring on a 45 degree angle.


You want most of your weight to be on your rear foot on the outside edge of your skate. That way you squat mostly into your rear foot and use your front foot more for balance.


The last point is that when you are learning this you MUST commit to the stop. Don't turn in a tight arc and do it half way. Go for it and you will likely fall down a bunch of times but you will start to develop a feel for what your body needs to do.

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08-27-2010, 11:33 AM
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goman
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Originally Posted by Defgarden View Post
Hi guys,

I started up a skating class (hockey skills), and learned a bunch of neat things on my first class. Kinda nice to get some tips after trying to learn on my own. Anyways, I can comfortably do a snowplow stop on my left skate inside edge, and can even turn my whole body sideways with both skates to come to a stop (not quite a hockey stop, but close). The thing is, I can't seem to do it on my right side. Even just trying to snowplow is difficult. I try and try, but it just doesn't seem to work the same way. Any ideas on how to break this slump and stop on my right side?
I taught powerskating and hockey skills for 10 years and I used to get people in proper hockey posture (knees over toes, shoulders over knees, head up, feet shoulder width apart) and then just get them to scrape the ice with their inside edge. Keep in mind, I mean scrape as in push from your set hockey posture out so that you are partially extending your leg.

Try that for 30 seconds or so on each foot. You should be making 2-3 inch wide x 12" or so long marks in the ice. If it doesn't feel good on the one foot make sure you're in posture and you're pushing down into the ice while extending out. This is a 1 foot stopping motion.

Once you feel comfortable stationary, try it from a glide. Take a couple of strides, glide for a few seconds and then try to push your one foot into the ice and do the same motion you were just practicing.

Other than that, it's just practice. But get that scraping motion down first so you feel what it feels like. Remember to keep your posture strong (that includes keeping your head up so don't watch your feet!) and push deep into the ice, as if you're trying to get underneath it.

Hope that helps!

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08-27-2010, 04:02 PM
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Defgarden
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Even scraping feels weird on my right skate (though I can do it). It just seems like I can't scrape while gliding, I'll usually get chattering or just end up turning left. It's perfectly fine for my left side, I can stop just fine (not a full blown hockey stop mind you but well enough for now).

I bring it up as a concern mainly because our instructor told us to just practice stops in preparation for next week's class and to not practice what we learned as much (mostly xovers and backwards skating).

I did finally get comfortable with some backwards skating though. It's a neat feeling to do something somewhat right. Having an instructor totally helps, and I'm going to abuse his knowledge next time for sure.

Thank you all for the tips! I'll try what I've read here, and what I picked up in some articles.

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08-27-2010, 04:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Defgarden View Post
Even scraping feels weird on my right skate (though I can do it). It just seems like I can't scrape while gliding, I'll usually get chattering or just end up turning left. It's perfectly fine for my left side, I can stop just fine (not a full blown hockey stop mind you but well enough for now).
My first thought without seeing you is you should just try pushing really pushing your skate into the ice hard. If the blade is chattering as you say, that's because the blade is coming in and out of the ice, it's bouncing off the ice essentially. So, push down harder so the blade doesn't come off the ice and that should get rid of it.

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08-27-2010, 05:00 PM
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Everyone has a strong side and a weak side for skating. The key is to keep practicing on both sides until they are about even... but even then you're still going to have a strong side and a weak side. I'm sure that you also turn better in one direction than the other, and that you pivot turning in one direction better than the other as well.

If you can't hockey stop right away on your weak side, just practice scraping the ice.

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08-27-2010, 05:41 PM
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Just an idea for the OP, you might want to check your blades to make sure that they're A) sharp and B) someone didn't fux0r up the sharpening on that one skate. I had that happen and trust me, it'll make a world of difference. Just an idea.

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08-28-2010, 12:49 AM
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Originally Posted by WhooFleuryScores View Post
I still stop better on my left foot, but if you bend ur knees enough and lift up with ur toes and then do the stop on ur right skate might work better.
this right here...

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08-28-2010, 06:03 PM
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Defgarden
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Just got back from the ice. I was able to do a snowplow on my right side fairly easily this time. Guess it all worked. I even got better at slow hockey stops on my left side, and was able to do it sometimes on my right. I think it'll just get better with practice. I did it almost perfectly once, but wasn't able to do it again with the same sort of confidence. It was way easier when the ice was freshly paved, but got harder as time went on.

Thanks everyone for the tips! I think I'll be able to handle this now!

Oh, definitely one thing I was noticing was my temporarily lifting of my center of gravity when stopping on the left side, so I just tried to repeat that motion but on my right, and that seemed to work. I read an article that gave some instructions.

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Hockey-1547/Stopping.htm

that really seemed to help me. Plus the raising the toe trick, really made me think about my feet.

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08-28-2010, 06:17 PM
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first off, don't be afraid of falling. that's the main thing that gets in peoples heads and makes them scared of doing a one foot stop.


basically you are taking the last step on your left skate, then you turbn your body around, and your right skate will no longer be pointed in the direction you are going but, left towards the boards.

sure you might think by doing this, your just going to immediately topple over, but if you left up your left leg kinda like a dog taking a piss, and keep the top of your body straight enough (not leaning over) your skate should not skid, but make a perfect " /=================/ " (white streak ) on the ice, and you should come to a stop without falling.


two foot hockey stops are lame. one foot is the way to do it.

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08-28-2010, 08:11 PM
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If you get moving fast, then try stopping on your right, you'll have better success. The speed thing helps you get over the jitters you get trying to stop at slow speeds because you tend to slide better. Get in to it gradually and put more pressure as you start to feel comfortable.

Good luck.

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Old
08-29-2010, 12:55 AM
  #20
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Simple advice.

If you want to stop on your right foot;
First turn your head left
Then turn your sholders left
Then turn your hips left
Your skates will follow.

DO NOT put alot of pressure on your skates. Put a bit of pressure on the middle of your blade, but NOT the heal or toe.

When your about to stop, get a bit low. When your feet turn, bounce up a bit, then immidetly return to low.

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Old
08-30-2010, 03:09 AM
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I had trouble with the right side hockey stop also. I nursed it and could do it at slow speeds, but it wasnt perfect by any means. I didnt practice it that much, but now I am able to do it. What I was doing was this 180 turn around and used my right foot to scrape the ice to stop. By doing this I basically got comfertable with my edge on my right foot and I actually think I stop better with my right foot foward now.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Dump and Chase View Post
You want most of your weight to be on your rear foot on the outside edge of your skate. That way you squat mostly into your rear foot and use your front foot more for balance.
I've always understood you want the weight on the outside foot, and inside foot is for balance... ???


Last edited by NJDwoot: 08-30-2010 at 03:44 AM.
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08-30-2010, 09:53 AM
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The last point is that when you are learning this you MUST commit to the stop. Don't turn in a tight arc and do it half way. Go for it and you will likely fall down a bunch of times but you will start to develop a feel for what your body needs to do.
When I was learning, this was BY FAR the hardest thing for me to do. However, once I got it through my head that I just had to commit to the stop in order to learn it, I got the hang of it very quickly. Practice it at stick and puck when you're fully padded. You will fall down but it will not hurt.

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08-30-2010, 10:00 AM
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Dump and Chase
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I've always understood you want the weight on the outside foot, and inside foot is for balance... ???

Let me qualify this first by saying that I am not a power skating teacher and I have not taken skating lessons since I was a child. This makes me unsure of what beginning skaters are being taught today.


My left leg is my dominant one and if I want to make my most comfortable and aggressive stop I will stop with the outside edge of my left skate and the inside edge of my right. A one footed stop for me would be on the outside edge of my left skate.


There are a couple of reasons why I was taught to do it this way:


- After a stop you are going to be heading in the opposite direction. If I have stopped on the outside edge of my dominant foot I am in position to explode on my strongest leg for my first stride after the stop.


- You get much more aggressive body positioning when stopping on your rear leg than you do off of your front leg. When you get more lean in the opposite direction of the stop you transfer more energy to the ice and stop faster.

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