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Hockey Stop

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Old
08-30-2010, 01:30 PM
  #1
Bulls9220
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Hockey Stop

Alright ive been playing for 2 yrs. Im really good and my skating great but i have never been able to do a hockey stop. I could easily play Travel nd crap if i could stop. Anyone have any tips cause i am pretty much just anoyed at this point.

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08-30-2010, 01:50 PM
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JagrBomb
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Wow. I've been playing for about 6 weeks now and that's the first thing I made myself learn. I skated public sessions several times a week for about three weeks before I got it down from both directions. Here's an article and video that helped me:

http://howtohockey.com/how-to-hockey-stop

The way I learned, you're pretty much doing all the work with your lead foot (the right foot if turning left and vice versa). Just get used to doing a plow stop with that foot and slowly put more and more of your weight on it when you do it. Then, when you're more comfortable with that, twist your hips and while leaning "back" from the turn. Your momentum will throw you back up. It helped me at first to turn my head (but not my upper body) in the direction of the turn to focus me. After many, many repetitions you will begin to develop muscle-memory and it will become second-nature. Remember to practice in both directions!

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08-30-2010, 02:02 PM
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kr580
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Personally, the way I learned was using a snow plow stop with one foot, with the front skate barely sliding over the ice, not digging at all. The idea is to keep movin while feeling that sliding feeling, which turns into a stop eventually. Your other foot should be straight and gliding with all of your weight on it while you have the other at a 45 degree angle scraping the ice. Skates should look like this if you're skating up the screen: / |

Once you get comfortable with it sliding over the ice you can start to pivot the front foot and start digging in a bit to stop. Start to do a snow-plow but pivot your heel to the outside (don't swing leg, twist your ankle), pivot hips, sit down a little, lean back a little and finally lift your back foot which has all the weight on it and you should grind to a halt. Practice at slow speeds to get the stopping feeling. Once I got comfortable with 1-footed stops I was able to gradually tap my back foot down little by little until I got comfortable having it bear some weight.

Also, if you're off balance try keeping your shoulders pointed to where you're going to keep your momentum going forward. I see alot of people turn their shoulders along with their hips and just end up doing a sharp turn on accident. Also, try both sides a bit to see which one clicks first. I spent alot of time trying to stop on my right side but got absolutely nowhere... then one day I decided to try left foot forward and I got it down in 5 minutes.

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08-30-2010, 02:22 PM
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Everyone has a stronger side so figure out which side is your strong side and focus on that one until you get the mechanics down. Also start off slow. One or two strides and then stop. Keep repeating over and over. The only way to get them down is good form and repetition.

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08-30-2010, 02:51 PM
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Excellent description KR580 that's exactly what I did to learn to stop on my weak side.

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08-30-2010, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kr580 View Post
Also, if you're off balance try keeping your shoulders pointed to where you're going to keep your momentum going forward. I see alot of people turn their shoulders along with their hips and just end up doing a sharp turn on accident. Also, try both sides a bit to see which one clicks first. I spent alot of time trying to stop on my right side but got absolutely nowhere... then one day I decided to try left foot forward and I got it down in 5 minutes.
This is a good thread for me as I am basically in the same boat. I have been skating since last winter, but I just joined organized adult ice hockey lessons this month. Anyways what you described above is what happens to me every time I try to stop. Instead of sliding across the ice I do a quick turn and one of my coaches told me I am overcompensating and turning too much. So what you are saying is that I need to just turn my ankles and keep my shoulders kind of pointing forward? I need so much help in this category b/c I can skate well and I have a pretty good shot, but not being able to stop is really killing my confidence. Anymore advice would be appreciated.

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08-30-2010, 03:51 PM
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Jarick
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The basic motion is similar to a quick turn, but as you turn, you bend your knees and sit down a bit, digging your edges into the ice.

A good way to start to learn is just to stand up while facing and holding onto the boards and just scrape your inside edge of each foot out away from the body. Feel it scrape along the ice, and eventually dig more and more into the ice. You have to roll your foot a little to be able to lean on that edge, but you'll get the idea.

Oh and when I was learning, it was literally super slow coasting and then quick turn and try to stop. Very, very slow. Then work up the speed and confidence. I'm still a little weaker on one side and need to learn to use my outside edge of the other foot better but I can stop just fine and play up to C-level.

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Old
08-30-2010, 07:06 PM
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Perhaps this will help with the "physics"...

There's an axiom in skating, and that's that wherever your head goes, you go. If you turn your head, you then turn your shoulders, and so on. If you find yourself endlessly trying hockey stops, and instead executing really sharp turns, this is what is happening.

In order to perform a hockey stop, you need to defy "hockey physics". You've got to learn to tell your top half to keep going straight ahead while your bottom half turns 90 degrees. That's the end game. Ideally, you can already do both snowplow and T-stops, as these will teach you about edges and bending your knees properly.

Find yourself an empty patch of ice at the next public skate, wear your shinpads, and have no fear.

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08-30-2010, 07:29 PM
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nullterm
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Once you get the feeling of scraping one blade along the ice with no weight, then you'll have an "Ah hah!" moment and the rest is just repetition practicing it and getting comfortable putting more weight into it.

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08-30-2010, 08:34 PM
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Open skates helped a lot.... mainly the crappy ice eliminated any chance of the edge biting too much. It made it way easier to start the scraping motion.

Like everyone has said, baby steps. Start with a barely noticeable snowplow with one foot just to get the feeling of scraping. Imagine keeping the blade at a perfect perpendicular 90 degree angle on the ice. Each time you feel comfortable (not all at once, not in any particular order)... increase the angle, add speed, dig in more, and eventually you can start to turn your body into it more and more. The strong side will be 300x easier than the weak side.

Just get it out of your head that you are going to go from nothing to full hockey stop in one outing.

I know we are all saying the same thing... but hopefully one reply helps

Edit: A friend of mine learned by getting some rental skates and trying it with those for the first session or two, the dull blades helped a lot. Not sure if this is a good idea (maybe others can chime in).... If you would prefer the comfort of your own skates, you can have your skates sharpened shallower to make it more favorable for you to scrape. Just some ideas.


Last edited by TBLightningFan: 08-30-2010 at 08:46 PM.
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Old
08-30-2010, 10:04 PM
  #11
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Here is a good instructional video.


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08-30-2010, 10:43 PM
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A guy at stick and puck the other day asked me to teach him the hockey stop... I felt kind of bad b/c I didn't know how to explain it.. but I think I was on the right track!

So the idea is to learn how to scrape the ice, then snowplow, then do the "T" stop (turn one foot, keep the other straight) before turning the back foot to make it a full hockey stop...


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rangersrule1 View Post
Alright ive been playing for 2 yrs. Im really good and my skating great but i have never been able to do a hockey stop. I could easily play Travel nd crap if i could stop. Anyone have any tips cause i am pretty much just anoyed at this point.
If you can't hockey stop, you can't play travel. Even if you learn how to hockey stop today, you'd have to spend a lot of time working on transitions before you could be a good enough skater for it. I'm not trying to put you down or be mean, I'm just being honest.

I have a friend who (still) insists that he would have played AAA if he started skating earlier.... he thinks he's an elite hockey player that's just handicapped because he can't do X, Y, and Z. After four seasons of ice hockey and six years of skating he still can't do crossovers, skate backwards, or do a hockey stop. He doesn't get any better because he thinks he's hot stuff... so he doesn't push himself out of his comfort zone or even attempt to learn how things are done.

With that being said, heed the advice from this thread and go work on it. You'll get it eventually, it just takes time. Also remember that you'll never stop properly if your skates are too loose around the ankles. If you hit the brakes and your skate is loose, you'll just do what's called "catching an edge" and go flying. I saw a kid in hockey school break his ankle because of that many years ago.

Another tip for the open skates: if you can, try to take up some space along the boards behind the goal line or in around center ice. Most of the skaters just go round and round in an oval along the boards and between the goal lines. By taking up that open space, you can practice your skating, stopping, and whatever else you need in both directions.

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Old
08-30-2010, 11:55 PM
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisrollins1 View Post
Wow. I've been playing for about 6 weeks now and that's the first thing I made myself learn. I skated public sessions several times a week for about three weeks before I got it down from both directions. Here's an article and video that helped me:

http://howtohockey.com/how-to-hockey-stop

The way I learned, you're pretty much doing all the work with your lead foot (the right foot if turning left and vice versa). Just get used to doing a plow stop with that foot and slowly put more and more of your weight on it when you do it. Then, when you're more comfortable with that, twist your hips and while leaning "back" from the turn. Your momentum will throw you back up. It helped me at first to turn my head (but not my upper body) in the direction of the turn to focus me. After many, many repetitions you will begin to develop muscle-memory and it will become second-nature. Remember to practice in both directions!
Thanks for the mention Chris, I'm glad the article and video helped you out.

I have another video that I am going to post this year that breaks it down even more, with super simple steps.
In the new video I show how to get used to "peeling ice" with your skates and getting used to the edges. I think that will help the true beginners a bit more.

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08-31-2010, 02:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nullterm View Post
Once you get the feeling of scraping one blade along the ice with no weight, then you'll have an "Ah hah!" moment and the rest is just repetition practicing it and getting comfortable putting more weight into it.
This is 100% what I am waiting for, the Ah hah! moment. I know once I get the feeling of that first stop I know I will be good. Last Friday night I went to a public skate and it was really hard to work on stuff b/c it was so crowded, but one thing happened that kind of helped me out. I was skating around and strating to pick up some speed and I went around one kid and then all of a sudden a women and her little kid darted out from the other direction. I had to turn out of the way so quick that I started and little hockey stop and made it around them. That is the first time that has happened and now I need to work on having that feeling again.

I can't even tell you how much I am into hockey right now so working hard at it is not going to be an issue

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Old
09-01-2010, 01:58 AM
  #15
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Make sure you lean back a bit and use the balls of your feet. When done properly, you'll feel like you're getting thrown forward a bit, so if you don't lean back, you might slip.

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09-01-2010, 02:48 AM
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nullterm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChiTownHawks View Post
This is 100% what I am waiting for, the Ah hah! moment. I know once I get the feeling of that first stop I know I will be good.
Start with just gliding forward. Shift all your weight onto one foot and balance on the one blade. Then with no weight on your other foot, swing the no weight foot in front and let it just slide along the ice.

| |

to...
_
.|

To start out, no weight on that front foot and push your ankle forward so the blade is vertical, not at an angle. If the blade is vertical then it won't bite as much.

vertical...
___|____

not...
___/____

Once you get more confident, then more weight.

Once you get confident with the weight, then more angle.

Pushing the ankle forward to get my blade vertical was my "Ah hah!" moment. Forgot about that cause I don't do it anymore, but as a learning step it helped me alot. Kinda like training wheels.

I also got a shallower hollow for my skate sharpening (3/4") which made it easier to slide until my ankles and confidence were stronger.

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Old
09-01-2010, 10:20 AM
  #17
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I can't stop for crap on my weak side. Something I should work on. Funnily enough, I have a hard time stopping on that same side when I attempt to snowboard (I'm still learning).

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09-01-2010, 11:15 AM
  #18
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Originally Posted by DubiSnacks17 View Post
I can't stop for crap on my weak side. Something I should work on. Funnily enough, I have a hard time stopping on that same side when I attempt to snowboard (I'm still learning).
I had (and still have) the same problem, and posted a thread on it last week. I posted an article there towards the end of the thread that gives exercises on twisting your body (on skates of course) and deals with a lot of shifting of your center of gravity.

I thought this was key, because I started to notice that I was doing this all along when stopping on my left side. Once I realized what I was actually doing, it because much easier to stop on my right side. It's still not as good as my left, I can at least do it now, and will continue to practice to build my muscle memory.

http://en.allexperts.com/q/Hockey-1547/Stopping.htm

Here's an excerpt...

"First of all, think safety. Do not practice skating towards the boards. Practice skating away from the boards or at least twice your body height distance skating parallel to the boards, in case you have a tumble. Second, your 'hockey stance' is important, so ensure your knees are bent, head up, back straight, leaning slightly forward, skates shoulder width apart. Now, third, the two foot hockey stop progression.
Exercise A. Knee Bends. Stand in the 'hockey stance', with your skates pointed toward a fixed point I will call north, then bend your knees lower about 5 inches and then come up. This is called unweighting yourself. This unweighting moves your centre of gravity upward. As you come upward, pivot yourself so your skates point to the west 90 degrees. Keep your skates shoulder width apart as you do this. Your edges on your skates can turn because you are 'unweighting' yourself moving upward slightly with the knee bend. This is similar to doing the 'twist'. Bend your knees again and then extend your legs to move upward enough to turn the skates north again. Repeat this stationary, turning to the east 90 degrees using the same method. After getting the hang of this, then go from east to west a full 180 degrees, bending and extending and bending again as you finish the movement.
Exercise B. Stride and Glide. Take three strides safely forward, glide on two skates and then bend your knees just as before, lowering your body, then extend your knees as you continue to glide forward. Slow down, and repeat the same lowering and raising several times. Only take a few strides. You are doing this to 'unweight' yourself while moving.
Exercise C. Stride, Glide and Slide.(the beginning of the hockey stop). Take three strides north as in Ex. B, glide on two skates, and then as you unweight yourself, turn you skates sideways to the west and slide sideways on the flat of the skates (do the twist to the west). You are trying to slide on the bottom edges, not stop on the inside edges yet. Repeat this to the east several times. As you get better at sliding try going faster with only three strides still and sliding for distance sideways. If you catch your leading skate edge and fall forwards your balance is off, and you need to stay above your edges.
Execise D. Stopping. Stride three strides and minimize the gliding time. Just extend your knees as you come up from the stride, and turn your skates to the west using the inside edge of the front skate and the outside edge of the back skate with the body turned 90 degrees. As you turn the 90 degrees, then lower your body weight by the knee bend and press the edges into the ice as you lean back bit. Repeat this several time in both directions. If you are weaker in one direction, practice that side twice as much. Your head is still watching where you are going as much as you can."

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