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How to get more power

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Old
09-08-2010, 11:40 AM
  #1
Blueland89
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How to get more power

I was wondering if anyone could help me on my wrist shot I can put it close to where i want but i don't have a lot of power on it. I just imagine it would like a like a beach ball to a goalie as mush time as he has to react is there a excersize or technic to help me build me power

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09-08-2010, 12:10 PM
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Jarick
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Can you post a video?

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09-08-2010, 12:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Can you post a video?


But seriously. . .

If you want to get more power from your wrist shot you have to learn to incorporate the major muscle groups and transfer your weight leading up to the release. I'll see if I can find a tutorial, but be advised that a powerful wrist shot takes longer to set up and perform than either a flip shot or a wrist shot off your front foot, both of which lack the power that you're looking for. In short, your shot can be quick or it can be powerful. It's not very often that it's both.

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09-08-2010, 01:07 PM
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Okay, here's a quick tutorial from an 8 year old. And yes, I did get some valuable pointers from him.




Note that when Drew lines up for the shot his body isn't facing the net -- he's perpendicular to the net. If you were to draw a line from one shoulder to the other it would be right in line with his target.

1. To start, the puck is behind his back foot and the stick blade is protecting the puck.
2. Weight is on the back leg, knees are bent.
3. As you begin the wrist shot three things happen:
a. your lower hand presses down on the stick as if you were sweeping it into a dust pan.
b. you push off with your rear leg and transfer your weight to your front leg. As your weight shifts forward it adds power to your shot.
c. you twist your waist like you're driving a golf ball -- back shoulder comes down and forward while your front shoulder comes up and back.

Of course, as you follow through you pull your top hand back and push your lower hand forward, and roll your wrists just as the puck is leaving your blade but most of your power comes from your waist and from transferring your weight forward.

It goes without saying but there are plenty of other tutorials available on youtube.

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09-08-2010, 01:15 PM
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Here's a link for a video on youtube with Mike Cammalleri

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNDqs...ext=1&index=14

In the video he talks about using a low flex shaft (80 flex). I would say you could practice on your technique on dryland (if you cannot get ice time) and hockey specific exercises to create more leg strength and core strength. Also, probably wouldn't hurt to try using a softer flex shaft so that you can get the shaft to load better.

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09-08-2010, 01:17 PM
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Blueland89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Can you post a video?
maybe in a day or two i could. could my stick be too long

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09-08-2010, 01:47 PM
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Well there's a lot of ways to get power on a shot...but I would focus on the wrist shot as a stepping stone to the snapshot, that's where you get a lot more power. There's basically no reason to take a wrister in a game.

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09-08-2010, 02:37 PM
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Follow the techniques above and shoot and shoot and shoot and then shoot some more and try get some mustard on it every time. Make your forearm muscles burn.

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09-08-2010, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
There's basically no reason to take a wrister in a game.
I disagree completely. A wrist shot is generally more accurate than a snap or slap shot. As a result it can be tipped more easily and if there's a rebound it's easier to anticipate where it's going.

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09-08-2010, 02:54 PM
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My snap shot has power and so does my slap shot (of coarse). could my main problem be strength in my forearms? i Know it may be hard for you to tell without a video but....

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09-08-2010, 02:56 PM
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Shooting regularly helps build your muscle memory, and it activates the muscles involved in shooting, which will help build your muscles as well.

Technique is one of the most important factors though, I have a hard wrist shot, but if I try to shoot left handed (I'm right handed) I have a muffin. The muscle memory and technique just isn't there, even though I know how, and have the muscles, I haven't programmed my muscles to shoot left handed.

For power and technique check out these videos

How to take a wrist shot for beginners


All those points are important, hand near the middle of the stick, weight transfer, pulling the puck back, weight transfer, getting power from your core muscles.

Here is one for a different way of shooting, you get LESS power so make sure you know the difference. This is shooting from the off foot

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09-08-2010, 03:00 PM
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Frankie Spankie
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I really don't think it's the right advice so take it for what it is, but I find that if I put my hands closer to gether on my stick, I get a lot more power on wrist shots. I know it's not the right technique, but maybe it's worth giving a shot?

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09-08-2010, 03:27 PM
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For me personally, I get velocity from my wristers by having a long wind up; I like starting my shot behind me, then move it forward.

The trouble is that this means my velocity depends on how much space I have for wind up. Which means in game time, your space to wind up is usually limited by how well the other team defends you.

The only solution I find here for wristers specifically is if you load up your stick but I personally don't like flexy sticks as they torque back when I battle for the puck with someone; so this solution isn't really a solution for me specifically.

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09-08-2010, 03:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blueland89 View Post
My snap shot has power and so does my slap shot (of coarse). could my main problem be strength in my forearms? i Know it may be hard for you to tell without a video but....
If you have a good snapshot why would you worry about the wrister? It takes more time to get off and has less velocity. I'd just work on the snapper.

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09-08-2010, 03:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blueland89 View Post
My snap shot has power and so does my slap shot (of coarse). could my main problem be strength in my forearms? i Know it may be hard for you to tell without a video but....
Let's say there are 5 muscle groups that go into a powerful wrist shot. Yes, if you strengthen one muscle group it will add to your power. But if your technique is poor and you're only using your arms and your waist you're ignoring three more sources of power.

If you stand on the mound and keep both feet planted on the ground, toes pointed at the batter you'll probably have to lob the ball to get it over the plate, no matter how strong your arms are. If you take a step as you're throwing the ball you're adding the momentum of your weight transfer to the speed of the ball. Instead of a step you lunge forward as you throw the ball, and now it's going faster. Now you twist at the waist as you lunge forward while you throw. So again, it's not the strength of any one muscle group that's going to give you a lot of power, it's the coordination of a lot of muscle groups that will give you maximum power. And consequently you'll get much more power from your core (legs and abs) than you will from your arms.

It would still be very useful to see video if you can tape yourself. Even though you're getting power in your snap and slap shots I wonder if you're getting as much power as you could get from things like proper weight transfer.

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09-08-2010, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
If you have a good snapshot why would you worry about the wrister? It takes more time to get off and has less velocity. I'd just work on the snapper.
If he's asking how to improve his wrist shot why are you trying to convince him he doesn't need it? I'm just curious.

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09-08-2010, 04:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmptyNetter View Post
If he's asking how to improve his wrist shot why are you trying to convince him he doesn't need it? I'm just curious.

You need both in your tool bag. You can take a quick release wrist shot in a lot of positions that you can't snap it.


IMO you need to learn a wrister first to get the mechanics down and then the snap shot is built on top of it.

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09-08-2010, 04:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmptyNetter View Post
If he's asking how to improve his wrist shot why are you trying to convince him he doesn't need it? I'm just curious.
Because it's like learning the snowplow after you learn the hockey stop...not really all that useful.

The wrist shot is the foundation for the other shots, so it is important to learn, but the snap shot has advantages with no disadvantages:

- you shoot the puck from the side of the body or in front, not from behind, making for a quicker release

- you load the stick more than in a wrist shot, increasing power

- you snap your wrists and aim for the target like in a wrist shot, same accuracy

For me, a pure wrist shot has almost no stick loading component to it. You are bringing a puck that is from behind the back leg to the body, transfer the weight, and aggressively push your bottom hand and pull back on the top hand and snap the wrists towards the target.

With a snap shot, the puck is closer to the body, you push your weight down and into the stick, then push/pull with your arms and snap your wrists towards the target. Quicker release, higher velocity, same accuracy.

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09-08-2010, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Because it's like learning the snowplow after you learn the hockey stop...not really all that useful.

The wrist shot is the foundation for the other shots, so it is important to learn, but the snap shot has advantages with no disadvantages:

- you shoot the puck from the side of the body or in front, not from behind, making for a quicker release

- you load the stick more than in a wrist shot, increasing power

- you snap your wrists and aim for the target like in a wrist shot, same accuracy

For me, a pure wrist shot has almost no stick loading component to it. You are bringing a puck that is from behind the back leg to the body, transfer the weight, and aggressively push your bottom hand and pull back on the top hand and snap the wrists towards the target.

With a snap shot, the puck is closer to the body, you push your weight down and into the stick, then push/pull with your arms and snap your wrists towards the target. Quicker release, higher velocity, same accuracy.
Just so we're clear I'm not arguing wrist shot vs snap shot. I'm arguing for the usefulness of learning how to get power from your wrist shot, and you seem to be arguing that it's a pointless exercise.

That being said, a snap shot requires that you lift your stick off the puck for the back swing. In that time an opponent can either steal the puck or check your stick before the shot is taken.

With a wrist shot you can effectively skate around the rink with your stick loaded and ready to shoot, and I'm not clear why you say that there's almost no stick loading component to a wrist shot. In fact, it's easier to take a wrist shot while skating since it's all one fluid motion and the puck never loses contact with the stick blade until its final release. What's more a puck carrier can use the momentum of his skating and add that to the puck's velocity.

I think it's inaccurate to say that a snap shot offers equal accuracy to a wrist shot. In a wrist shot the puck is on the blade at least twice as long, giving the shooter more control over the puck's direction.

And not to be overlooked, mastering the wrist shot makes it much easier to make a clean saucer pass.

BTW, what's wrong with learning the snowplow?

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09-08-2010, 05:48 PM
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Snapshot doesn't require that at all. When you're carrying the puck to your side and have the stick loaded then release, that's a snap shot. All bringing the puck behind you does is slow the release time.

A wrist shot is what little kids with no strength at all do with the puck. Draw it way back and try to fling the thing towards the target. When you start loading up the stick heavily and can release it without a huge windup, that's when it becomes a snap shot.

EDIT: That video above is a wrist shot, when the little kid had to do all that work to get that shot off. As Howie Meeker used to say, if you can't do 35 pushups on their fingertips, you don't have the strength to do a proper wrist shot (what we now call a snap shot).

It becomes semantics, sure, but look at the Cammalleri video in which he shows a "wrist shot" (and even admits it's morphed into a snap shot):



The blade is a couple inches behind his back leg at his side, not way, way behind him. He doesn't break contact with the puck, it only takes maybe a foot of space to release the puck very quickly, and it's deadly accurate.

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09-09-2010, 12:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EmptyNetter View Post
Just so we're clear I'm not arguing wrist shot vs snap shot. I'm arguing for the usefulness of learning how to get power from your wrist shot, and you seem to be arguing that it's a pointless exercise.

That being said, a snap shot requires that you lift your stick off the puck for the back swing. In that time an opponent can either steal the puck or check your stick before the shot is taken.

With a wrist shot you can effectively skate around the rink with your stick loaded and ready to shoot, and I'm not clear why you say that there's almost no stick loading component to a wrist shot. In fact, it's easier to take a wrist shot while skating since it's all one fluid motion and the puck never loses contact with the stick blade until its final release. What's more a puck carrier can use the momentum of his skating and add that to the puck's velocity.

I think it's inaccurate to say that a snap shot offers equal accuracy to a wrist shot. In a wrist shot the puck is on the blade at least twice as long, giving the shooter more control over the puck's direction.

And not to be overlooked, mastering the wrist shot makes it much easier to make a clean saucer pass.

BTW, what's wrong with learning the snowplow?
I agree completely. Further, if you are a forward and get a rebound in front with the goalie sprawled down low, it works way better to grab a loose puck and roof it. That is all in the wrists.

Snapshots are great, but do not undersell a good wrister. Plus (see: Sakic, Joe) a good quick wrister can fool keepers who are not ready. It is easier to disguise a wrister because the stick doesn't come off the ice.

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09-09-2010, 12:32 AM
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To answer the actual question - do you lift weights at all?

If so, I'd recommend:

1) A modified snatch. Hold a weight bar at your knees or mid-thigh (palms toward body). Then flip the bar up to in front of your shoulders (palms away from body). The typical lift extends the bar above your head - your choice to do that part.

2) Forearm curls - sit on the end of a bench, knees together. Grab a bar, hold it with a narrow grip off the end of your knees (like off the end of a table) and curl the bar all the way up and down - like a hyper-flexion and hyper-extension of your wrists.

3) Grab 3 light weight plates - like two or three 5 lbs plates. Stack them and hold them together between your thumb and fingers palms down (think of carrying a brick palms down) and hold them as long as you can - until you drop them.

Lastly, I am a fan of cutting down a broken stick or round piece of wood to about 18 inches and drilling a hole in it. Put a piece of heavy string / skinny rope through a 5 or 10 lb weight plate and through the hole and tie it off. You can then hold the stick out in front of you palms up and down and then roll your hands over and over wrapping the string around the stick moving the weight up and down.

Those descriptions are not too good, but if they make any sense, those are great wrist and forearm work outs.

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09-09-2010, 01:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Snapshot doesn't require that at all. When you're carrying the puck to your side and have the stick loaded then release, that's a snap shot. All bringing the puck behind you does is slow the release time.

A wrist shot is what little kids with no strength at all do with the puck. Draw it way back and try to fling the thing towards the target. When you start loading up the stick heavily and can release it without a huge windup, that's when it becomes a snap shot.
You're working with the wrong definition of a snap shot. A snap shot is like a baby slap shot -- the back swing is only about knee high so the stick blade doesn't follow a big windmill path. Check out this video that details how to correctly do a snap shot.





Quote:
It becomes semantics, sure, but look at the Cammalleri video in which he shows a "wrist shot" (and even admits it's morphed into a snap shot):



The blade is a couple inches behind his back leg at his side, not way, way behind him. He doesn't break contact with the puck, it only takes maybe a foot of space to release the puck very quickly, and it's deadly accurate.
That is a wrist shot. I think Cammalleri is saying that the flex of his stick makes it easy to get power comparable to what one would get from a snap shot. It's kind of a mystery what he meant but here's a guess --

When you take a slap or snap shot the blade of your stick hits the ice about 6 inches behind the puck. You're aggressively bending the stick backward as though you're loading a catapult. As you follow through with the shot the stick will eventually unload, flinging the puck forward. The stick that Cammalleri was using is whippy enough that he can get comparable "fling" while doing a wrist shot. He's not saying he isn't doing a wrist shot. As a matter of fact he still calls the video "How to perfect the wrist shot. . ."

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09-09-2010, 10:46 AM
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Jarick
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Maybe, but I redefined them. If all a snap shot is a slap shot with a short windup, then it's a short windup slap shot.

Wrist shot - all the power comes from using the bottom hand as a lever, quick push-pull of the forearms whips the puck off the blade.

Slap shot - power comes mainly from loading the stick via backswing and weight transfer.

Snap shot - combination of the two, stick gets loaded via weight transfer but puck is released through forearm push-pull and wrist snapping.

With these definitions, there's no ambiguity in the instruction. If you're going to call the Cammalleri shot a short-windup wrist shot and the traditional wrist shot the long-windup wrist shot, that implies the shooting motion is similar, when it really isn't. The traditional wrist shot can be done with a 150 flex stick since you're barely using stick flex at all, while the modern wrist/snap shot required a stick with some whip so you can load it. That's why snappers really weren't around much until recently. Watch old game footage and 99% of shots were either slappers or wristers. When you have stiff wood sticks that are cut really short, those are your options. Now, we have composite sticks with built in flex and people are using sticks several inches longer so they can use the energy of the sticks for harder and quicker shots.

I REALLY need to make a video demonstrating this point, I haven't seen a good one yet.

BTW, I do have the Hull shooting video, and I really got some good things out of it, but I do have some problems with it. The snap shot described above has very little power unless you're using a very whippy stick for example. And they instruct you to take a slapshot with the backswing all the way up perpendicular to the ice!

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09-09-2010, 12:12 PM
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Maybe, but I redefined them. If all a snap shot is a slap shot with a short windup, then it's a short windup slap shot.

Wrist shot - all the power comes from using the bottom hand as a lever, quick push-pull of the forearms whips the puck off the blade.

Slap shot - power comes mainly from loading the stick via backswing and weight transfer.

Snap shot - combination of the two, stick gets loaded via weight transfer but puck is released through forearm push-pull and wrist snapping.
Stop. You can't take an established term and assign it your own definition for your own convenience. Especially when you're telling the OP not to bother with a wrist shot since he can use a snap shot, without first establishing that you're speaking only of the Jarick-snap shot.

I'm going to step away from this debate. I didn't mean to steal Blueland89's thread.

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