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How to get more power

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Old
09-09-2010, 12:36 PM
  #26
Jarick
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Give me a break. There's no universal hockey dictionary that says what a snap shot is. Go to 10 different people and you'll get 10 different responses.

Look at my definition of a snap shot. Lean into the stick and snap your wrists to propel the puck to the target. You can do that breaking contact with the puck if you want to or not. But when you start a backswing and weight transfer, it's a slap shot, period. Same mechanics, just a short windup.

People far smarter and more experienced than me:

Quote:
There is no "official" definition of a snap shot. That's why you see people on youtube calling anything and everything a snap shot.

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Old
09-09-2010, 12:46 PM
  #27
Jarick
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Finally, once again, the reason I defined the shots is not to sit here and call attention to myself, it's to work on them so I have a deadly shot and score goals.

If I don't know what a snap shot is, how do I work on it? I tried the Bobby Hull snapshot (by the way, he defines two different snapshots in the full DVD, calling one of them a "pro snapshot" and the other one is the short windup slapper linked above), it didn't do much for me.

The reason I separated the wrist from snap shot is to teach beginners the basics of shooting. Try getting someone who's new to hockey to execute a shot where they roll the puck from heel to toe while cupping the puck and snapping open then close the blade and transferring weight while trying to load the stick etc etc...it's impossible. You start with the basics...weight transfer and push-pull of the forearms. When that is down, you add the wrist snap component for better accuracy and increased velocity.

After that, there's no point in having the exaggerated puck from several feet behind the body. The snap shot is to be taken in motion, use the weight transfer and momentum you've generated through your natural skating stride. Just lean into the stick and rip the shot. Don't take a long windup, just rip it and go.

If you're not moving, you can't take a snap shot. You'll have no velocity. So you can either take one of those long windup wristers or a slap shot. They both have the same windup/release time, but the slapper has more velocity.

So at the end of the day, the wrist shot's only function is to be a learning tool for the snap and slap shot.

Unless you're in a no-slapper league I guess, then the old timey wrist shot can be useful.

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09-09-2010, 01:57 PM
  #28
Dump and Chase
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I have never seen a snap shot defined as taking the stick back to knee height until now. I disagree with that definition. As soon as you start to backswing...It's a slap shot IMO.




Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
The reason I separated the wrist from snap shot is to teach beginners the basics of shooting. Try getting someone who's new to hockey to execute a shot where they roll the puck from heel to toe while cupping the puck and snapping open then close the blade and transferring weight while trying to load the stick etc etc...it's impossible. You start with the basics...weight transfer and push-pull of the forearms. When that is down, you add the wrist snap component for better accuracy and increased velocity.

After that, there's no point in having the exaggerated puck from several feet behind the body. The snap shot is to be taken in motion, use the weight transfer and momentum you've generated through your natural skating stride. Just lean into the stick and rip the shot. Don't take a long windup, just rip it and go.

If you're not moving, you can't take a snap shot. You'll have no velocity. So you can either take one of those long windup wristers or a slap shot. They both have the same windup/release time, but the slapper has more velocity.

So at the end of the day, the wrist shot's only function is to be a learning tool for the snap and slap shot.

You don't need to take a full windup to shoot a wrist shot. You can release the biscuit from lots of different spots on lots of different angles.


You teach the big long wrist shot wind-up to beginners because this slows the mechanics down and makes it easier to learn. It also generates optimum power.


The fact is you don't always need optimum power. Sometimes all you need is quick release, or to get the shot off in close to your feet or out away from your body. To make a blanket statement and say that a wrist shot is redundant is really bad advice.



To OP. Understand and practice these concepts for power on your shot:


Weight transfer
Hip torque
Stick loading

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Old
09-09-2010, 02:20 PM
  #29
Blueland89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joey13 View Post
To answer the actual question - do you lift weights at all?

If so, I'd recommend:

1) A modified snatch. Hold a weight bar at your knees or mid-thigh (palms toward body). Then flip the bar up to in front of your shoulders (palms away from body). The typical lift extends the bar above your head - your choice to do that part.

2) Forearm curls - sit on the end of a bench, knees together. Grab a bar, hold it with a narrow grip off the end of your knees (like off the end of a table) and curl the bar all the way up and down - like a hyper-flexion and hyper-extension of your wrists.

3) Grab 3 light weight plates - like two or three 5 lbs plates. Stack them and hold them together between your thumb and fingers palms down (think of carrying a brick palms down) and hold them as long as you can - until you drop them.

Lastly, I am a fan of cutting down a broken stick or round piece of wood to about 18 inches and drilling a hole in it. Put a piece of heavy string / skinny rope through a 5 or 10 lb weight plate and through the hole and tie it off. You can then hold the stick out in front of you palms up and down and then roll your hands over and over wrapping the string around the stick moving the weight up and down.

Those descriptions are not too good, but if they make any sense, those are great wrist and forearm work outs.
Yeah i workout and i have done al of those thing just haven't lately

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Old
09-09-2010, 03:14 PM
  #30
RobertKron
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This is a snapshot.

The low windup slapshot version is something that is often taught to young kids because they lack the wrist strength to take a proper snap shot, and they're trying to teach the general idea of a snap shot not involving constant contact with the puck like in a wrist shot. As the kids get stronger, progression to a proper snap shot is possible.
Somehow along the line, that progression started getting ignored by a lot of people and the half-slapper as a snapshot gained legitimacy. Just because a lot of people call it that, it doesn't mean it's right.

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Old
09-09-2010, 03:32 PM
  #31
Jarick
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That's pretty much what I'm talking about as well. The reason it's got such a long windup in that video is because it's taken from a standstill.

The best way to take them is like most of these shots:



LOTS of power in those shots, all using momentum from skating and often from leaning into the stick for power.

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