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Your recommendation for a curve (defenseman)

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Old
09-15-2010, 06:19 PM
  #1
SouthpawTRK
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Your recommendation for a curve (defenseman)

So, I'm hoping that someone could recommend a curve more so for playing defense? I'm thinking about either the Chara or the Drury ;currently I'm using the Malkin; but I'd like to hear what other d players are using. I'm an entry level beer league player, so I'm not even sure if I'm over thinking the idea that a curve may actually help me. Thanks in advance for any feedback

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09-15-2010, 07:26 PM
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Thepandamancan
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Long blade and square toe are something to look for...I used a Getzlaf blade for a couple games as a defenseman. It was great cause it had a really nice, big sweetspot for slappers and one timers. I liked it but I just couldn't make the switch from my Crosby blade that I've used for a while.

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09-15-2010, 10:38 PM
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Loto68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthpawTRK View Post
So, I'm hoping that someone could recommend a curve more so for playing defense? I'm thinking about either the Chara or the Drury ;currently I'm using the Malkin; but I'd like to hear what other d players are using. I'm an entry level beer league player, so I'm not even sure if I'm over thinking the idea that a curve may actually help me. Thanks in advance for any feedback
I always preferred a heel curve on defense, it allowed me to better trap pucks against the ice without them ricocheting up, and my backhand always felt stronger and more accurate which was very important in clearing the puck out of the zone along the boards.

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09-15-2010, 10:48 PM
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blueberrydanish
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loto68 View Post
I always preferred a heel curve on defense, it allowed me to better trap pucks against the ice without them ricocheting up, and my backhand always felt stronger and more accurate which was very important in clearing the puck out of the zone along the boards.
^^ I love my heel curves, as for the squared toe I loved mine besides the fact it got tore up to hell fast =\ . Might just been my easton though( was s15 blade). Helps for easy saucer passes out of the zone, clears, getting shots up off the ice. Some people say bigger curves make it harder for backhands but personally I can make soft lil saucer passes alot better on my backhand than my forehand hah.

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09-15-2010, 10:48 PM
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SouthpawTRK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Loto68 View Post
I always preferred a heel curve on defense, it allowed me to better trap pucks against the ice without them ricocheting up, and my backhand always felt stronger and more accurate which was very important in clearing the puck out of the zone along the boards.
Thanks for your personal experience with a heel curve! Out of curiosity which heel curves did you use? Likes and dislikes would be helpful as well.

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09-15-2010, 10:50 PM
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SouthpawTRK
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Thanks for the recommendation on the Getzlaf! It looks a little funky (compared to what I've been using), but it sounds like it would be very functional!

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09-15-2010, 11:08 PM
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The Spicy Shrimp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepandamancan View Post
Long blade and square toe are something to look for...I used a Getzlaf blade for a couple games as a defenseman. It was great cause it had a really nice, big sweetspot for slappers and one timers. I liked it but I just couldn't make the switch from my Crosby blade that I've used for a while.
I play a lot of D and I like the Crosby pattern too. It's long enough and not very tall.I don't take a lot of slapshots or one timers, but for a nice wrister in the high slot you can't beat it. I took a few from the point/top of circles/high slot last night at drop in and people were in awe. My D partner even complimented it. Also good for getting some power behind the puck while clearing it up the boards.

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09-15-2010, 11:34 PM
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SouthpawTRK
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Out of curiosity, what does the lie feel like on the Crosby? All the charts that I've seen list it as a 7; which seems like a lot; plus I'm used to more of a 5 lie. Does the Crosby have a small amount of rocker so that it doesn't feel like a 7? I like the idea of it being a heel type curve and the blade is a bit longer than other curves; just unsure about the lie.

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09-15-2010, 11:59 PM
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The Spicy Shrimp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthpawTRK View Post
Out of curiosity, what does the lie feel like on the Crosby? All the charts that I've seen list it as a 7; which seems like a lot; plus I'm used to more of a 5 lie. Does the Crosby have a small amount of rocker so that it doesn't feel like a 7? I like the idea of it being a heel type curve and the blade is a bit longer than other curves; just unsure about the lie.
I tend to skate fairly upright, so I like the lie. Not much of a rocker from what I can tell. It's not a right angle, but it definitely keeps most of the blade on the ice.

Also, it looks like they have a new Crosby with a 5.5 lie and a mid heel curve out this year.

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Old
09-16-2010, 12:36 AM
  #10
budster
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You might look into a Modano. Pick a blade that allows you to put a lot of wood on the puck and has a low loft. This will keep your shots low and help you on the follow up when garbage collecting.
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09-16-2010, 12:56 AM
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Loto68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthpawTRK View Post
Thanks for your personal experience with a heel curve! Out of curiosity which heel curves did you use? Likes and dislikes would be helpful as well.
Unfortunately, I used to use wood blades that I could heat and alter, so I wouldn't be able to tell you exactly what a I used to use, but if any of your teammates have heel curves, ask if you can try their stick out, its the only way to get the right feel.

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09-16-2010, 01:59 AM
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Most defensemen prefer a heel curve, usually with a wedge. Good for saucer passes and slapshot elevation if needed.

Easton Drury, Getzlaf or Zetterberg would all be good choice, they just differ in amount of wedge and lie, in the case of the Zetterberg.

Use a blade comparison chart to compare between manufacturers.

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09-16-2010, 07:35 AM
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What makes you want to switch? What's your game like? What kind of shots do you usually take?

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09-16-2010, 08:57 AM
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I use a Harrow #7 pattern, which is essentially a Getzlaf/Lidstrom/Jovanovski/Phaneuf depending on manufacturer. Heel curve, big square toe great for grabbing puck out of corners. I wish it had a little less loft on it, as it seems to want to go to the top shelf all the time, and I have to consciously try and keep it low, but overall I'm very happy with it.

One teammate tried it out and complained that the big blade hampered his stickhandling a bit, but I'll never be mistaken for a dangler, so It does well for me.

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09-16-2010, 09:39 AM
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Ricky Bobby
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Originally Posted by clevelandcrusaders82 View Post
Most defensemen prefer a heel curve, usually with a wedge. Good for saucer passes and slapshot elevation if needed.

Easton Drury, Getzlaf or Zetterberg would all be good choice, they just differ in amount of wedge and lie, in the case of the Zetterberg.

Use a blade comparison chart to compare between manufacturers.
A heel curve is definitely the way to go. I use a Zetterberg (Forsberg curve which seems to be getting fazed out is the exact same curve) cause it has a huge sweet spot. I've also liked the Crosby.

As a D-Man you also want to use a stick with a bit higher flex rating as D players tend to take more slappers and snappers.

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09-16-2010, 10:56 AM
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I wanted to say thanks to everyone that replied the thread I posted yesterday regarding your recommendations for a curve (for defensemen).

I've only thought about switching, not because I do not like the PM9 curve, but because I do not want to have blinders on when it comes to other curves.

I've only been playing beer league hockey for a handful of months, and during the entire summer season, it's (the PM9) the only curve I know. I do like the curve, but at the same time, I do not want to be close minded and not look at other curves that may be better suited for playing defense.

Most of the shots I take are wrist shots, the amount of opportunities for slap shots are not as frequent. I would love to take more slap shots, but I do feel more comfortable with a wrist shot. However, I realize that as a defender, one needs to be comfortable with slap shots from the point (something that I'm working on).

When I finally make a decision on which curve I decide to go with, I'll definitely post my curve purchase.

Once again, thanks for all the helpful responses

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09-16-2010, 11:50 AM
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Jarick
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I'm not one to believe there are certain curves for certain positions, but there are certain curves to help your game. If you take a lot of wrist shots, use a curve that you have the most accuracy and velocity. If you stickhandle a lot, maybe you want a curve with the right lie/rocker combination. If you want to tip pucks or intercept passes, try a longer blade. If you're a big passer, try a flatter curve. If you play on the boards a lot, try a squarer toe, etc.

My game is all about puck movement and snap shots, so I switched to the Drury. The flatter blade is great for forehand and backhand passing and improve my accuracy on shots. The loft is high so that I can turn my wrists over and drive the stick into the ice more for slap shots.

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Old
09-16-2010, 02:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
I'm not one to believe there are certain curves for certain positions, but there are certain curves to help your game. If you take a lot of wrist shots, use a curve that you have the most accuracy and velocity. If you stickhandle a lot, maybe you want a curve with the right lie/rocker combination. If you want to tip pucks or intercept passes, try a longer blade. If you're a big passer, try a flatter curve. If you play on the boards a lot, try a squarer toe, etc.
That is true, to a point. I'm guessing most beer league defencemen won't have much need for stickhandling, tipping, and wristshots, though. There's the odd offensive defenceman out there, but they're a rarity in beer league (at least, in the leagues I've played in).

The stick attributes that come to mind when I think about a more "traditional" defenceman (and which have already been said) are:

- Heel curve (not too much curve, 1/2" or less) and closed faced for low slapshots from the point.
- Low lie (5 or lower), and shaft slightly longer than a forward's stick, for stick checking.
- Large toe for digging in corners.
- Higher flex for stronger slapshots.

Of course, these are general guidelines. If you like skating circles around opponents, get a higher lie. If you're more offensive and like skating up to the net, get a larger, mid- or even toe-curve for high wristshots. If you have a weaker slapshot or only take wristshots, maybe get a lower flex.

As is with most pieces of hockey equipment, what works for you is *far* more important than what works for someone else.

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Old
09-16-2010, 04:43 PM
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blueberrydanish
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As many have said heel wise the Getz/Lidst in Easton obviously, and for Bauer the p106(gagne)...but if you can manage to find a p02(marked samsanov/pronger) thats much more like the Getz/Lidst and has a square toe whereas the gange doesnt, but if ya find one of those for sale in just a blade let me know! Also to note I have seen that square toe blades seem to be slightly longer naturally because it its squared off, which is nice for D.

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09-20-2010, 12:11 AM
  #20
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If you've been using a mid curve (PM9), don't buy a heel (or toe) curve without trying it out first. I've tried quite a few curves but anything other than a mid curve feels wrong for me (or at least a fairly mid curve, the P88 is my fave curve and it's not a pure mid I guess, but close enough).

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09-20-2010, 03:20 PM
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I play forward in a C league and defense on a firewagon team in a B league and I use the Chara/Gaborik curve. If I have no time to get off a shot the big hook makes it easier for me to get a good wrist/snap shot off and I don't have a slap shot. So like others have said it depends on what type of player you are and what you're used to. I started using the Coffey curve more than 10 years ago so the big hooks aren't a problem for me since I know how to receive passes, how to pass and how to shoot with it. If you're going to war it's nice to know you have a weapon you like and it won't let you down when you need it. Switching curves takes adjustment and in some cases it just isn't the right fit for your game.

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Old
09-22-2010, 03:45 PM
  #22
Joe Cole
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+1 on the Getzlaf curve.

Big sweet spot, good loft.

In fact I wish it had even more loft!

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Old
09-23-2010, 09:50 PM
  #23
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Personally, i'm pretty partial to the Spezza curve, but that seems far from typical for a d-man.

A lot of personal preference involved.

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Old
09-24-2010, 11:02 AM
  #24
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I've played defense all my life (mix in a little forward here and there)... I've used the Easton-Sakic and the Warrior-Draper curves... I have thought about giving the Lidstrom/Getzlaf curve a try to see if i like it at all

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