HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

Sticks - which hand?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
09-26-2010, 01:10 AM
  #1
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
Sticks - which hand?

Wait I am so confused... Went to first ball hockey game last week and was told if I'm right-handed I'm most likely going to shoot right, so the instructor showed me how to hold the stick and it turned out to be right hand lower and left hand on top (total beginner here, didn't know how to hold a stick previous to this game). Although, how can I know whether I really do shoot right? As a total beginner, I don't feel a difference when trying one way or the other. Am I supposed to get two sticks to test it out??? (Supposedly a lot of Canadians shoot left? lol I dunno.)

And then (because I want to play goal eventually and was curious as to whether I would be a regular or a full-right) I went on Youtube and this dude is like "if your left hand is dominant you want your blocker on the left and that will go on top" and "if your right hand is dominant you want the blocker on the right and that hand will go on top" and now I'm like.... WHAAAAT??

Really confused here. Already bought a stick according to what the instructor said, and now I'm confused because of this Youtube vid.... Next ball hockey game is tomorrow and I want to know if I'm using the wrong stick, so quick replies would be much appreciated. Thanks guys.

Copeland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-26-2010, 01:50 AM
  #2
Im Old Gregggg
Registered User
 
Im Old Gregggg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Kitchener, On
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,027
vCash: 500
being right handed does NOT mean your more likely to shoot right handed (i know plenty of rightys that use LH hockey sticks and gold clubs etc)

if it feels natural for you to hold the stick with your right hand on the middle of the stick and left hand on the top YOU should shoot right handed, if its the opposite your a lefty.... to some people both feel fine in which case it comes down to preeferance


your shot power and accuracy comes from your bottom hand and the hand on the top of the stick is all about control and stickhandling (usually its better to shoot with your more dominate hand on the middle of the shaft as your shot will be better), but honestly play some stick n puck with both types and youll QUICKLY find out what works better

Im Old Gregggg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-26-2010, 01:53 AM
  #3
Thepandamancan
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 232
vCash: 500
For sticks, it's really a preference thing. Traditionally, right handers will shoot right handed (meaning right hand is on lower part of stick) and vice-versa. However, the thinking is that for better stickhandling you want your dominant hand on top of the stick because that's where a lot of the coordination happens. Therefore, if you are right handed you'd want your right hand on the handle and left hand lower. At the end of the day, do whatever feels right to you. You may be a better stick handler shooting left, but can't do a slapshot to save your life. You're just gonna have to stick to shooting right or try both out till you find what's comfortable for you.

As for goalie...think of it like baseball. You're right handed but you catch with the left. Again, the dominant hand is used for blocking and stick handling since it's the stronger hand you can get a better grip on the stick, etc.

Thepandamancan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-26-2010, 01:57 AM
  #4
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thepandamancan View Post
For sticks, it's really a preference thing. Traditionally, right handers will shoot right handed (meaning right hand is on lower part of stick) and vice-versa. However, the thinking is that for better stickhandling you want your dominant hand on top of the stick because that's where a lot of the coordination happens. Therefore, if you are right handed you'd want your right hand on the handle and left hand lower. At the end of the day, do whatever feels right to you. You may be a better stick handler shooting left, but can't do a slapshot to save your life. You're just gonna have to stick to shooting right or try both out till you find what's comfortable for you.

As for goalie...think of it like baseball. You're right handed but you catch with the left. Again, the dominant hand is used for blocking and stick handling since it's the stronger hand you can get a better grip on the stick, etc.
Wrongo, the opposite is the traditional view. Dominant hand on top is a good 70% rule, but the real determining factor is what feels better. Keep in mind that you will spend more time stickhandling than you will shooting, so pick which ways allows you to control the puck with more ease, one handed etc.

Another easy method is the broom test. This just means that whichever hand you put on top of a broom when sweeping is the same hand you should keep on top of your stick.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-26-2010, 02:28 AM
  #5
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
Hmm... Will try out that broom test in a sec.

Considering what you said about stickhandling and control, I'm kind of regretting getting the righty stick... Like I said, thing is that I can't feel a difference with just one game and picking up the stick a little at home.

Also, I'm thinking... if I'm going to be holding the handle with my right as a goalie, maybe I should do that now as well. What do you think about this? Should that be a factor?

As for going to pick-up games... My skating isn't good enough yet for ice hockey, and the only ball hockey pick-ups over here are for players who are "confident" (says the community centre description) in their skills, so obviously not for beginners.

EDIT:

Broom test result = Dangit I got the wrong stick.

Sigh.


Last edited by Copeland: 09-26-2010 at 02:48 AM. Reason: Test Result
Copeland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-27-2010, 02:52 AM
  #6
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
Most players shoot left.

Think about it this way: when you first hold a stick and start playing with a puck or ball, you are working on your stickhandling. Your stickhandling is predominantly controlled with the hand at the top of the stick. Most people will end up putting their dominant hand at the top of the stick for more control.

edit: Don't buy into the composite hype... if you're a newbie, get a wooden stick! That way buying the wrong stick only burns $25 out of your pocket, not $250. Besides, you're likely to break some sticks as a newbie too.

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-27-2010, 03:39 AM
  #7
Kritter471
Registered User
 
Kritter471's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Dallas
Country: United States
Posts: 7,719
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to Kritter471
The way my (former IHL player) first coach taught me was that most Americans shoot right, most Canadians shoot left. Americans tend to learn baseball as a kid. In baseball, right handed people put their right hand on top when they hold a bat, which translates to your bottom hand in hockey. They learn the weight transfer this weight both in a baseball swing and a golf swing, and it's relatively similar to a hockey weight transfer on a shot. When they pick up hockey either as a kid or later, they translate that motion to a right-handed hockey shot.

Canadians, meanwhile, tend to learn to swing a hockey stick first, and like many have mentioned here, the biggest difference is puckhandling, which doesn't exist in either of the other "swing sports." Because the top hand is basically responsible for the fine motor control in puck handling, they want their strongest hand on top, which in a right handed person would mean a left shot stick. Because about 90 percent of people are right handed, that means about 90 percent of Canadians are left shots while about 90 percent of Americans (less in some of the areas where hockey is a bigger youth sport than baseball) are right shots.

If you've been a righty baseball player or golfer and decide to be a left shot hockey player (which is what I did when I started), a left shot will feel strange for a good long while, especially the shooting motion. Stickhandling is definitely easier, but there's a real tendency to try and stab at the puck with just your top hand on the stick, and you have to relearn the weight shift and build strength in your left (lower/power) arm.

Honestly, you can learn either way and it's not going to be a huge deal. It will be easier to stickhandle but harder to shoot as a beginner if you go left shot and easier to shoot but harder to stickhandle if you go right shot.

The easiest solution would probably be to go to a stick and puck or drop in and explain to a friendly-looking left shot who's about your height and who has an extra stick that you're a beginner and don't know which side stick you need, that you've tried right and want to mess around with his stick for a session. I went left shot because that first coach was a left shot and let me try his stick for a practice. I think I "donated" my original, cheap right-shot stick to the rink in case someone needed one.

Kritter471 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-27-2010, 04:10 AM
  #8
nullterm
Registered User
 
nullterm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Port Moody, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 2,557
vCash: 800
If you want to learn to shoot in a short amount of time, go right. Dominant hand as your bottom hand means a better shot (atleast in the short term).

If you want to be a better stick handler, go left. Dominant hand on the top means you'll have better puck/stick control, while your bottom hand just has to support the stick.

When you control the stick with one hand or to poke check, your top hand is the one in control for when you need to reach, poke check, etc. So if your dominant hand is top, you'll naturally be stronger at it.

I'm right handed, shoot right, trying to see if I can switch to left. As yet, I can't shoot left very well, but my stick handling is naturally just as good or better than when I use a rightie.

nullterm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-27-2010, 01:05 PM
  #9
Jimmy Carter
Avs/Leafs fan
 
Jimmy Carter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Western NY
Country: United States
Posts: 1,244
vCash: 500
If both feel okay to you right now, go with lefty. Always more lefty sticks and blades in my hometown hockey places and online. I wish I shot left for that reason alone, could get some really nice sticks on crazy clearance.

Jimmy Carter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-27-2010, 01:08 PM
  #10
Jimmy Carter
Avs/Leafs fan
 
Jimmy Carter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Western NY
Country: United States
Posts: 1,244
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by nullterm View Post
If you want to learn to shoot in a short amount of time, go right. Dominant hand as your bottom hand means a better shot (atleast in the short term).

If you want to be a better stick handler, go left. Dominant hand on the top means you'll have better puck/stick control, while your bottom hand just has to support the stick.


When you control the stick with one hand or to poke check, your top hand is the one in control for when you need to reach, poke check, etc. So if your dominant hand is top, you'll naturally be stronger at it.

I'm right handed, shoot right, trying to see if I can switch to left. As yet, I can't shoot left very well, but my stick handling is naturally just as good or better than when I use a rightie.

I second this. My friend who is righty but shoots left started out having a really weak shot but could stick handle decently. I'm a righty who shoots right and I started off with a decent shot but awful stick handling. After a while practicing though, one will catch up with the other.

Jimmy Carter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-27-2010, 02:12 PM
  #11
noobman
Registered User
 
noobman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 4,636
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kritter471 View Post
The way my (former IHL player) first coach taught me was that most Americans shoot right, most Canadians shoot left. Americans tend to learn baseball as a kid. In baseball, right handed people put their right hand on top when they hold a bat, which translates to your bottom hand in hockey. They learn the weight transfer this weight both in a baseball swing and a golf swing, and it's relatively similar to a hockey weight transfer on a shot. When they pick up hockey either as a kid or later, they translate that motion to a right-handed hockey shot.

Canadians, meanwhile, tend to learn to swing a hockey stick first, and like many have mentioned here, the biggest difference is puckhandling, which doesn't exist in either of the other "swing sports." Because the top hand is basically responsible for the fine motor control in puck handling, they want their strongest hand on top, which in a right handed person would mean a left shot stick. Because about 90 percent of people are right handed, that means about 90 percent of Canadians are left shots while about 90 percent of Americans (less in some of the areas where hockey is a bigger youth sport than baseball) are right shots.

If you've been a righty baseball player or golfer and decide to be a left shot hockey player (which is what I did when I started), a left shot will feel strange for a good long while, especially the shooting motion. Stickhandling is definitely easier, but there's a real tendency to try and stab at the puck with just your top hand on the stick, and you have to relearn the weight shift and build strength in your left (lower/power) arm.

Honestly, you can learn either way and it's not going to be a huge deal. It will be easier to stickhandle but harder to shoot as a beginner if you go left shot and easier to shoot but harder to stickhandle if you go right shot.

The easiest solution would probably be to go to a stick and puck or drop in and explain to a friendly-looking left shot who's about your height and who has an extra stick that you're a beginner and don't know which side stick you need, that you've tried right and want to mess around with his stick for a session. I went left shot because that first coach was a left shot and let me try his stick for a practice. I think I "donated" my original, cheap right-shot stick to the rink in case someone needed one.
That's honestly the best explanation for the difference that I've ever heard.

It makes a lot of sense too... I have friends who shoot left in hockey, but are rightys in the other sports (namely baseball and golf). I'm the only person that's a lefty in all three.

noobman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-28-2010, 02:41 AM
  #12
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
Great insights and suggestions. Thanks so much for the help! I wish I could go to a pick-up game and try it out that way, but alas I'm stuck at home... With two sticks now, however (And yes, I knew to get wood from the start!)

I think I'm gonna go the stickhandling route and use the lefty. Tbh I think it will probably be easier to improve on shooting strength/technique than on puck control, and it'll help me when I transition to goalie as well.

Will be interesting trying to un-learn and re-learn what I've learned in the past couple of weeks. Just watch me tank completely at my first game as a lefty (not that I didn't tank before... first goal ever and so far the only one was the epitome of a garbage goal crossed with that certain Sedin goal that supposedly never was haha......)

Copeland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-28-2010, 12:25 PM
  #13
Nakket
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 22
vCash: 500
I grew up playing baseball. I swing right handed, and I'd swing a golf club right handed. If I was holding a sword with two hands, my right hand would be on top for power. I do pretty much everything right handed.

The only time I experienced hockey was in PE, and I always remember feeling weird because I couldn't do the face off thing (hit the sticks together three times and then go for the ball) because I was a lefty and it didn't match up with the righties. I never really questioned it until I got to college and intramural floor hockey was more of the same. (All the plastic stick blades were curved righty.)

Nakket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-28-2010, 04:36 PM
  #14
Badger36
Registered User
 
Badger36's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Columbus, OH
Country: United States
Posts: 2,313
vCash: 500
Its really whatever your personal preference is. Try either stick and go with whatever feels best to you.
Im right-handed and I use a left hand stick. There really is no right or wrong answer to this question.
You usually want your dominant hand on top, because that will give you better stickhandling and better overall control of the stick.


Last edited by Badger36: 09-28-2010 at 04:47 PM.
Badger36 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-28-2010, 04:45 PM
  #15
BadHammy*
MSL For Hart!
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Right Behind Me!
Posts: 10,444
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJimmyCarterC View Post
I second this. My friend who is righty but shoots left started out having a really weak shot but could stick handle decently. I'm a righty who shoots right and I started off with a decent shot but awful stick handling. After a while practicing though, one will catch up with the other.
It's true and here's why. Beginners will, very incorrectly, use their arms for shooting power instead of transferring and using their body weight, and this is why they have a poor shot. I've found that this is a lot easier to correct in people than those who have hands of stone (commong for right handed people shooting RH), but then again, that's just me from maybe 30 to 40 cases in my own experience.

BadHammy* is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-28-2010, 05:15 PM
  #16
Headcoach
Registered User
 
Headcoach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Country: United States
Posts: 746
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to Headcoach Send a message via MSN to Headcoach Send a message via Yahoo to Headcoach
Ok, IMHO (very touchy subject) The reason why Canadians shoot left is because they are taught that the donate hand goes on top....always. That would be the artistic side, and yes, it is better to be a great stick handler then anything else. Why? Because it take the artistic side to thread the needle so to speak, within your pass.

Now, if feel that the reason why more American shoot right because they are not taught that the donate hand goes on top. They go into a pro-shop and the knucklehead in the pro-shop says..."Ah, which way do you bat?" Unbeknowst to him that the artistic side goes at the top. Why? Because he doesn't live in Canada where they teach it correctly! IT'S A HOCKY STICK NOT A BAT...HELLO!

It's just that, it's important to treat the sport as a sport, not something else. If it looks like hockey and it has a stick like hockey...it must be hockey. So, the first thing one should do, when they are new, is not go to your local sport shop where they sell soccer balls and ask them...if I kick with my right leg, do I shoot right with a hockey stick? Yes, I know that sounds stupid. But hockey and baseball are two different sports. Yes, the comment of comparing soccer to hockey is crazy, but you might as well have asked that when you started play hockey.

So all of you right shooting coaches, make sure that you tell your new hockey players the correct way to holding the stick before you tell them...how do you bat!

Yes, you can said, what a....

Head coach

__________________
Hundreds of Hockey Drill for FREE at http://www.passthepuck.net
Headcoach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-28-2010, 05:15 PM
  #17
Jarick
Doing Nothing
 
Jarick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: St Paul, MN
Country: United States
Posts: 24,984
vCash: 500
I'd also recommend going lefty if you have no preference. You have to learn proper shot mechanics either way, but it's a heck of a lot easier to control the puck with your dominant hand...for most people anyway.

Jarick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-29-2010, 01:42 AM
  #18
Copeland
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Vancouver, BC
Country: Canada
Posts: 143
vCash: 500
Speaking of shot mechanics and transferring body weight... Any tips on how to learn this? lol my arm's still sore from shooting on sunday, as I was obviously using the wrong mechanisms (arm strength only)

Copeland is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-29-2010, 02:03 AM
  #19
krax
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 238
vCash: 500
Hi,
A 4year old kid will be given a straight stick and will choose by himself. A lot of righthanders (something like 85% of the population) will choose to put their dominant hand on top of the stick. A lot of kids who write and throw a stone with their left hand, will choose to put their left hand on top.
Björn Borg, a swedish top class tennis player in the eighties, held his racket with his right hand. As a swede, he also played hockey and was one of the first players to hit two-handed tennis backhands just like shooting a puck with a hockey stick.

I did some statistics a year ago. Lefties are predominant in international icehockey:

Last year's entry rosters of the U20 World Championships: shooting or catching left/total number of players per team:
CAN 14/22=64%
CZE 18/29=62%
FIN 20/26=77%
RUS 27/30=90%
SVK 23/30=77%
SWE 22/30=73%
SWI 16/30=53%
USA 16/30=53%

Average 68%

Source: http://www.iihf.com
Not representative, but lefties are more common.


Olympics 2010:
http://www.iihf.com

L/R players and goalies:

BLR 3/23 87%
CAN 8/23 65%
CZE 6/23 74%
FIN 5/23 78%
GER 8/23 65%
LAT 5/23 78%
NOR 5/23 78%
RUS 3/23 87%
SUI 7/23 70%
SVK 3/23 87%
SWE 4/23 82%
USA 11/23 52%

Average: 75% lefties
USA is different from the rest of the world.

NHL 2010: of the 795 (797 total, but two of them have no indication L/R) players in the NHL 2010, 522 shoot left, i.e. 66%.
Source: http://www.nhl.com

Some more about the NHL:
L Defensemen: 187/267=70%
L Centers: 159/217=73%
L RW:39/155=25%
L LW: 140/157=89%
L Goalies: 60/68=88%

source: http://www.nhl.com

88% for goalies is quite surprising. Seems to correspond to the ratio righthanded/lefthanded of the population. Maybe they are not influenced by baseball. Only 1 goalie of the 11 US goalies catches right. 68 is a small number and might not be significant.

krax

krax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-29-2010, 02:43 AM
  #20
edgevolution
GO USA!
 
edgevolution's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: State of Hockey
Country: United States
Posts: 1,296
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by krax View Post

88% for goalies is quite surprising. Seems to correspond to the ratio righthanded/lefthanded of the population. Maybe they are not influenced by baseball. Only 1 goalie of the 11 US goalies catches right. 68 is a small number and might not be significant.

krax
This is because a left handed goalie has his glove on his left hand, meaning if he was playing baseball for instance, he would throw with his right hand, which is what a right hander would do. I don't if that makes sense but hopefully you get what I'm saying.

edgevolution is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-29-2010, 01:20 PM
  #21
krax
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 238
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by codemanh View Post
This is because a left handed goalie has his glove on his left hand, meaning if he was playing baseball for instance, he would throw with his right hand, which is what a right hander would do. I don't if that makes sense but hopefully you get what I'm saying.
That's exactly the point I was trying to explain. A right-handed goalie "shoots" left. When holding his stick with one hand (what he does most of the time) he uses his dominant hand. So yes, most player's who throw and write right, will hold their stick with their dominant hand, thus playing left. Makes sense to me. The right-handed players playing right are the minority in international ice-hockey.

One interesting thing: in field hockey, you are only allowed to play right! Kind of strange rule and stated the wrong way ;-)

krax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-29-2010, 01:24 PM
  #22
Headcoach
Registered User
 
Headcoach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
Country: United States
Posts: 746
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to Headcoach Send a message via MSN to Headcoach Send a message via Yahoo to Headcoach
Quote:
Originally Posted by krax View Post
Hi,
A 4year old kid will be given a straight stick and will choose by himself. A lot of righthanders (something like 85% of the population) will choose to put their dominant hand on top of the stick. A lot of kids who write and throw a stone with their left hand, will choose to put their left hand on top.
Björn Borg, a swedish top class tennis player in the eighties, held his racket with his right hand. As a swede, he also played hockey and was one of the first players to hit two-handed tennis backhands just like shooting a puck with a hockey stick.

I did some statistics a year ago. Lefties are predominant in international icehockey:

Last year's entry rosters of the U20 World Championships: shooting or catching left/total number of players per team:
CAN 14/22=64%
CZE 18/29=62%
FIN 20/26=77%
RUS 27/30=90%
SVK 23/30=77%
SWE 22/30=73%
SWI 16/30=53%
USA 16/30=53%

Average 68%

Source: http://www.iihf.com
Not representative, but lefties are more common.


Olympics 2010:
http://www.iihf.com

L/R players and goalies:

BLR 3/23 87%
CAN 8/23 65%
CZE 6/23 74%
FIN 5/23 78%
GER 8/23 65%
LAT 5/23 78%
NOR 5/23 78%
RUS 3/23 87%
SUI 7/23 70%
SVK 3/23 87%
SWE 4/23 82%
USA 11/23 52%

Average: 75% lefties
USA is different from the rest of the world.

NHL 2010: of the 795 (797 total, but two of them have no indication L/R) players in the NHL 2010, 522 shoot left, i.e. 66%.
Source: http://www.nhl.com

Some more about the NHL:
L Defensemen: 187/267=70%
L Centers: 159/217=73%
L RW:39/155=25%
L LW: 140/157=89%
L Goalies: 60/68=88%

source: http://www.nhl.com

88% for goalies is quite surprising. Seems to correspond to the ratio righthanded/lefthanded of the population. Maybe they are not influenced by baseball. Only 1 goalie of the 11 US goalies catches right. 68 is a small number and might not be significant.

krax
Wow...great work on finding this info...oustanding. However, I'm not sure that theory of tennis and hockey is the same as far as shooting! I not sure he placed his right hand at the top and placed his bottom hand down the racquet at the base of the webbing, known as the "throat"

http://www.itftennis.com/shared/medi...ticarticle.JPG

I think it would not be possible for someone to hold the raquet like that and get the shot off in tennis. But, I could be wrong...you never know!

Head coach

Headcoach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
09-30-2010, 10:29 PM
  #23
edgevolution
GO USA!
 
edgevolution's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: State of Hockey
Country: United States
Posts: 1,296
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by krax View Post
That's exactly the point I was trying to explain. A right-handed goalie "shoots" left. When holding his stick with one hand (what he does most of the time) he uses his dominant hand. So yes, most player's who throw and write right, will hold their stick with their dominant hand, thus playing left. Makes sense to me. The right-handed players playing right are the minority in international ice-hockey.

One interesting thing: in field hockey, you are only allowed to play right! Kind of strange rule and stated the wrong way ;-)
I was responding to you saying baseball must not effect US goalies. It in fact does. A right handed baseball player will "shoot" left as a goalie so that they can catch with the same hand as in baseball.

edgevolution is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-01-2010, 01:19 AM
  #24
mbowman
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Toronto/Halifax
Country: Canada
Posts: 493
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Wow...great work on finding this info...oustanding. However, I'm not sure that theory of tennis and hockey is the same as far as shooting! I not sure he placed his right hand at the top and placed his bottom hand down the racquet at the base of the webbing, known as the "throat"

http://www.itftennis.com/shared/medi...ticarticle.JPG

I think it would not be possible for someone to hold the raquet like that and get the shot off in tennis. But, I could be wrong...you never know!

Head coach
I think what he meant is that his backhand shot in tennis is similar to holding a stick left-handed in hockey, with the right (dominant) hand at the end/top/bottom of the stick/racquet, and the left in the middle.

I'm left handed, and it's always felt natural for me to shoot right in hockey. same goes for baseball, golf... hell, i even kick with my right foot.

mbowman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
10-01-2010, 01:29 AM
  #25
ponder
Registered User
 
ponder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Vancouver
Country: Canada
Posts: 11,914
vCash: 500
I'm right handed in normal life, but also use a right handed stick (left hand on top) cause that's what I chose when I started playing hockey at age 8. I think you just get used to whatever you chose.

ponder is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:11 PM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2015 All Rights Reserved.