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French help (need help again, Post #102)

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Old
10-15-2010, 07:59 AM
  #26
Gros Bill
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Originally Posted by Analyzer View Post
Yeah, it's not the best, but you don't just get a language like that. I'm still learning French too. They may disagree, since they tend to not use proper French, but going to the habs chat on hf helps keep your mind fresh in French.

When you're thinking, think in French. Counting, count in French. Unless you have to count outloud and the person doesn't understand French, then don't. If you live a lone, label things around the house in French.

Plus, saying you need help in French is a good way to get in touch with hot French chicks.
Pouvez-vous me donner un cours de langue, mademoiselle ?

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Old
10-18-2010, 11:43 AM
  #27
AHF
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Here's another term that has me confused: battery

In french, you have 'batterie' and 'pile'.

In reference to an automotive battery, I would use 'batterie'
In reference to small batteries, like the AA and AAA types, I would use 'pile'

What about power tool batteries, such as this one: http://www.rona.ca/magasinez/~pile-r...ique_magasinez

I see Rona uses the word 'pile'. Is that the generally accepted term in Quebec? Personally, I would've use 'batterie' in this case...

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Old
10-18-2010, 11:54 AM
  #28
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batterie : 9 synonymes.
Synonymes accessoire, accumulateur, artillerie, condensateur, cymbale, pile, tambour, timbale, ustensile.


http://www.linternaute.com/dictionna...tion/batterie/

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Old
10-18-2010, 12:23 PM
  #29
terreur
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Batterie and pile are both commonly used

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Old
10-18-2010, 12:25 PM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gros Bill View Post
Pouvez-vous me donner un cours de langue, mademoiselle ?
If I were a chick and spoke French, of course (As you can tell by the following sentence. Damn you conditionnel !

Si j'etais une fille et je peux parler le francaise, ben sûr

Or you could just go straight up and be like "Voulez-vous coucher avec moi ce soir ?"

She gets made, say you made a mistake in your sentencing structure.

Like one time I said Tu devrais dormir, or something like that. Apparently it was asking to sleep with her...

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10-19-2010, 10:27 AM
  #31
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Alright, one last one and I'll stop bothering you guys.

We've got a lot of tables/charts in our catalog with various data. One that often comes up is 'Temperature Range' (as in -40 to +30)...

In the past, this has been translated into 'plage de température'.

Does that sound right to you guys? It really doesn't sound right to me...

I brought it up to a couple people from Quebec, and both of them were puzzled with the term 'plage'. They didn't get it at all.

Now, according to : this page, it is an accepted term in french. I'm just wondering how common this is?

Is this another case of the reader being able to understand the term, even if it's not the right one?

Between, 'gamme', 'étendue', 'écart' or 'plage', which one would you choose? Or are they all good?

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Old
10-19-2010, 10:33 AM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AHF View Post
Alright, one last one and I'll stop bothering you guys.

We've got a lot of tables/charts in our catalog with various data. One that often comes up is 'Temperature Range' (as in -40 to +30)...

In the past, this has been translated into 'plage de température'.

Does that sound right to you guys? It really doesn't sound right to me...

I brought it up to a couple people from Quebec, and both of them were puzzled with the term 'plage'. They didn't get it at all.

Now, according to : this page, it is an accepted term in french. I'm just wondering how common this is?

Is this another case of the reader being able to understand the term, even if it's not the right one?

Between, 'gamme', 'étendue', 'écart' or 'plage', which one would you choose? Or are they all good?
Plage is the correct word.

http://www.larousse.fr/dictionnaires...is/plage/61299
Écart, intervalle, espace, latitude entre deux éléments, deux possibilités : Plage de prix.

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Old
10-19-2010, 11:18 AM
  #33
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Thanks, good to know it's a common term. It still sounds weird to me, but whatever.

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Old
11-04-2010, 11:31 AM
  #34
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Bon mots means like word play, or even a pun ?

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Old
11-04-2010, 02:25 PM
  #35
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On ne dit pas "joué le jeu" on dit "joués* au jeu", but even there it's not correct french, it's an anglicism. It should be "joués au hockey" ou "participés au sport".


*Variable dans le cas où le sujet est actif.

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Old
11-04-2010, 02:29 PM
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by terreur View Post
Batterie and pile are both commonly used
Batterie is always an assemblage of two or more piles.

http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batterie_d%27accumulateurs

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Old
11-04-2010, 03:14 PM
  #37
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«Bons mots» means «good words», «Jeux de mots» means «word play» and «pun» would be «calembour».

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Old
11-20-2010, 03:07 PM
  #38
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translate a phrase for me?

every time my dad is mad he yells something that resembles "sacra la sharlamen". he grew up in quebec so i guessed in a google search that it was "sacre la charlemen", and google said something like, did you mean "le Sacré de Charlemagne" or "Sacré Charlemagne"

I was wondering what, if anything, this means. He's been yelling it for years, it'd be nice to know if it even means anything lol

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Old
11-20-2010, 03:12 PM
  #39
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Sacrament?

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Old
11-20-2010, 03:13 PM
  #40
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Charlemagne invented school, i think it's just an expression from a song named sacré charlemagne. doesn't mean something in particular

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Old
11-20-2010, 03:15 PM
  #41
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not too sure what it means, but is your dad the same dad who said the Kostitsyns look like two bananas on the ice? lol

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Old
11-20-2010, 03:15 PM
  #42
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when he says it it sounds like "sacralasharlamen" lol so what does Sacre mean again lol

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Old
11-20-2010, 03:17 PM
  #43
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Sounds more Arabic than French.

Sacralacharlamen!

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Old
11-20-2010, 03:17 PM
  #44
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sounds like this?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXPslTPIB_w&translated=1

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Old
11-20-2010, 03:22 PM
  #45
Hugo Sham
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loosely translated - because you can't get a literal translation, is something like 'damn or ******* charlemagne'
chalemagne was king of the Franks...it's sort of like those who cuss:

'Jesus Murphy!'
lol

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Old
11-20-2010, 03:30 PM
  #46
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btw he could be saying Sacré Charlatan.

Which would mean damn imposter or something like that.

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Old
11-20-2010, 03:54 PM
  #47
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That's amazing, talk about nostalgia!

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Old
11-20-2010, 05:05 PM
  #48
Joey
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lmao thats it. its funny to hear it so playful because he always says it sooo angrily

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Old
12-02-2010, 09:00 PM
  #49
puckguy11
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Is there a way I can learn hockey terms in French so I can understand things like RDS/the Habs French radio call? I'm American so my Francophone background is non.

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Old
01-05-2011, 11:03 PM
  #50
Galchenyuk27
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Hey guys. I'm currently in my 2nd semester of college, and I'll be moving into French 102.

What would you guys say is the best way to learn French, especially Quebecois French? (is it even that different?) I know nothing comes easy, I just want it to be proficient. I got a B+ in my French 101 class, but I feel like I don't know much more than I did heading into it except for maybe picking up a few words per sentence when reading.

I'd prefer not to spend almost $1000 on software, but if that Rosetta Stone type stuff is good then I guess I'll go for that.

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