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Shooting on the move

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Old
11-03-2010, 05:23 PM
  #1
Maccas
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Shooting on the move

Hey guys,
I've only been playing a couple of months but I am having some major problems shooting while on the move.
I've been practicing shooting in the garden using an Acrylic pad and I can get ok power in a wrist shot and get it to just over blocker height with my feet rooted but when doing it on the move it normally ends up skipping over the ice with barely enough power to make it to the goal from the hash marks.
Are there any tips to practicing hitting it on the move? I only get about an hours ice time every week and being in the UK they don't do any stick & puck sessions
Any help would be greatly appreciated

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11-03-2010, 05:47 PM
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mobilus
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Majority of shooting on the move uses a snap shot, not a wrist shot.

With a wrist shot, the weight is on the leg opposite to your shooting hand (if you shoot left, weight is on the right leg when shooting). With a snap shot, weight is on the leg closest to your shooting hand (if you shoot left, weight is on your left leg). Practice in the driveway or parking lot with a puck. Don't worry about the moving part yet, just practice the snap shot. If you shoot left, actually lift your right leg in the air and lean over.... put all your weight on the one leg... then snap the shot. There's little drawback with the puck if any, unlike a wrist shot. Twist of the wrist - *snap* - puck is gone. Once you practice standing still, try it moving on skates next time your on the ice.

Edit to add, power comes from the speed of the stick, not the strength of your muscles. A fast shot is based upon your quickness. Your muscles are only needed to hold the stick firm when contact is made. Practice the shooting motion (any shot... snap, wrist, slap shot) without a puck, just thin air. Try to do the full motion as quickly as possible. Over and over... just the stick through the air. Once you have a speedy motion, practice with a puck, being conscious not to slow down the motion as the blade approaches the puck. Do not hesitate the motion just before contact. You're stronger than the puck. Get your stick movement to be as qucik, fast and complete whether there's a puck there or thin air.

Lastly, don't worry about how much you're raising the puck. Lift will come with quickness, then it's a matter of controlling the end of your swing motion to control how high the puck goes. Get speed first, raising will come naturally after that.


Last edited by mobilus: 11-03-2010 at 05:54 PM.
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11-03-2010, 06:03 PM
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blueberrydanish
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With a majority of everything in hockey...alot of it is just being a good skater and having good balance. It sounds like you just aren't getting much behind your shot cause you are trying mostly to stay up versus transfering your weight with the shot mid-stride. Just one of those things you NEED to be on the ice to completely get down trying to practice that off-ice is a toughy...

Off-ice keep practicing but practice shooting off the leg/position that you would be in mid stride and really try to lean your weight into them to learn how to take the shot off the ice but keep in mind what edges on your skate you would be using if you were on ice.

Also make sure if you are trying to do a wrister that you draw the puck back so you can get your weight behind it cause if it starts out a little ahead of ya that could be a reason you are flubbin it on the ice.

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11-03-2010, 07:40 PM
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Mithrandir
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It's being a good skater coupled with just having a good shot in general. When you start getting your practice shot, standing still, to be hard and accurate under the crossbar consistently than you will have a better shot while skating as well. If you can barely get it over blocker height standing still your shot still has a lot of improvement to go.

In general, shooting on the move, you want to be moving in a way that doesn't force you to go out of your way to get your shot off. Often that will mean cutting across the offensive zone from the off wing (stick on the inside of the ice) because this allows you to have the puck behind you in a convenient location to lean into a wrister as you come across the ice. It's also a pretty effective way to get a screen and fool the goalie, making him move side to side without projecting where you're going to shoot the puck. Ovie does it all the time.

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11-03-2010, 07:59 PM
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adaminnj
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it sounds to me like your not keeping the puck cupped and that when you shoot you are extending your arms and the toe of your stick is not square (Toe in the air) to the ice when you follow through.

I'm a beginner so take my response for what it's worth. but I know I had to work on cupping and stick position when I first started shooting.

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11-03-2010, 08:09 PM
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trtaylor
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This is what you want to replicate. He makes it look easy, but it's damn hard. Perfect practice makes perfect.


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11-03-2010, 08:18 PM
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canuck44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mobilus View Post
Lastly, don't worry about how much you're raising the puck. Lift will come with quickness, then it's a matter of controlling the end of your swing motion to control how high the puck goes. Get speed first, raising will come naturally after that.
I actually find it almost impossible to shoot low snap shots on the move without taking a lot off my shots. I can shoot high all day, but for low shots (like on the ice), I find I have to pretty much go to a wrist shot.

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11-03-2010, 09:29 PM
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mobilus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canuck44 View Post
I actually find it almost impossible to shoot low snap shots on the move without taking a lot off my shots. I can shoot high all day, but for low shots (like on the ice), I find I have to pretty much go to a wrist shot.
Try releasing the puck closer to the heel of the stick.

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11-03-2010, 09:38 PM
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Jarick
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Study that, it's huge. The weight transfer, quick shot, short windup, loading the stick, etc. I worked on that all summer and my teammates are really impressed by how much quicker my release is.

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11-03-2010, 10:52 PM
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canuck44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post


Study that, it's huge. The weight transfer, quick shot, short windup, loading the stick, etc. I worked on that all summer and my teammates are really impressed by how much quicker my release is.
VERY interesting video. I'm definitely gonna try some of this stuff next time I'm on the ice.

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11-04-2010, 12:21 AM
  #11
noobman
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Note that when you're skating with the puck, you keep it in front of you. Unfortunately you can't shoot with the puck that far in front of you, or else you won't get any velocity on your shot. You need to have the puck in a little closer... it can be off to the side, but it shouldn't be more than a few inches in front of you. When I watch Ovechkin shoot in-stride, the puck is vertically in-line with his feet, or even behind them.

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