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Remembering Pelle Lindbergh, 25 years on

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Old
11-07-2010, 10:37 AM
  #1
FreshPerspective
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Remembering Pelle Lindbergh, 25 years on

What could have been....


Quote:
A red Porsche 930 Turbo missed a curve at 5:41 a.m. A sports star at the top of his game slammed into a concrete wall in front of an elementary school in Camden County.

The Flyers kept winning hockey games, but life was never exactly the same.


Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/sports/...#ixzz14cCbx8rC




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Old
11-07-2010, 11:54 AM
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I stopped by that spot last night and paid some respects, such a shame, so much potential. Kinda shocking this doesnt happen more often with the way young people live in this country these days, considering the players make so much more money now.


Bobrovsky has drawn a LOT of comparisons to him throught the media, and we can only hope he can live up to it. Im not gonna go that far its been a few games, but one can hope right?

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11-07-2010, 12:07 PM
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If you want a good read, check out Bill Meltzer's book on Pelle. I highly recommend it.

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Old
11-07-2010, 12:51 PM
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DickTony
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Meltzer's book is indeed excellent, especially for those of us who didn't live through the whole Lindbergh saga. I can only imagine what could have been.

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11-07-2010, 04:08 PM
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I know it is sad (in theory), but I'm finding it hard to stand behind a drunk driver who almost ended the lives of two other people.

If he had ended the life of someone's kids, specifically yours, how much sympathy would you have?

I'd be cursing him to hell.

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11-07-2010, 05:57 PM
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The man's death was his own fault. He not only put his life on the line by driving drunk but endangered other people as well. Sure he was good, but he shouldn't be praised and honored. He's not Pat Tillman, he didn't die courageously.

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11-07-2010, 08:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hof2120 View Post
The man's death was his own fault. He not only put his life on the line by driving drunk but endangered other people as well.....
You Sir, are a giant ******. As if you have never in your life have made a mistake? No character flaw in side you at all?

Like many of us <I said "US" as YOU oh PERFECT ONE are excluded> he made a mistake. However there was no 2nd chance for him.

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11-07-2010, 09:57 PM
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I wasn't around to see him play but the story does sadden me as i've seen too many people die young, one most likely caused by the same thing Pelle's accident was. Especially sad seeing what could have been. I am 100% against drinking and driving but everypody makes mistakes, Pelle's cost him his life. I think it's disrespectful to say he doesn't deserve to be praised. I'm sure you would be singing a different tune if it was someone you knew and loved. RIP Pelle

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11-07-2010, 10:12 PM
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that (now abandoned) school creeps me out a bit to this day

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Old
11-08-2010, 12:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tommy D View Post
You Sir, are a giant ******. As if you have never in your life have made a mistake? No character flaw in side you at all?

Like many of us <I said "US" as YOU oh PERFECT ONE are excluded> he made a mistake. However there was no 2nd chance for him.
Sorry, but I lost my best friend to a drunk driver, she was walking home from my house and got hit. I know you probably don't care much to hear my life story but because of that incident I have no sympathy for anybody willing to get behind the wheel of a car while intoxicated and put other peoples' lives in danger because they're not responsible.

Not drinking and driving doesn't make me PERFECT, it makes me not ****ing retarded. If he wasn't a Flyers goalie you guys wouldn't give a **** about his death, he'd just be another statistic. Him dying is tragic, but the way he died is no one's fault but his own and because he plays for the Flyers doesn't make the means in which he died any more acceptable.

And no, I'm not perfect, I have done things wrong in my life but I've never put another person's life in danger while doing so.

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Originally Posted by CarolinaFlyerFan View Post
I wasn't around to see him play but the story does sadden me as i've seen too many people die young, one most likely caused by the same thing Pelle's accident was. Especially sad seeing what could have been. I am 100% against drinking and driving but everypody makes mistakes, Pelle's cost him his life. I think it's disrespectful to say he doesn't deserve to be praised. I'm sure you would be singing a different tune if it was someone you knew and loved. RIP Pelle
That argument is really flawed. Yeah, I lost somebody I knew and loved, but I have a feeling that's a bit more personal to me than Lindbergh dying is to you.

For the record, I'm not glad he's dead or anything, I agree it's tragic that he made a mistake and died. However, I just don't see praising and honoring a death caused in such a way as appropriate.


Last edited by hof2120: 11-08-2010 at 12:36 PM.
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Old
11-08-2010, 01:21 PM
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HOF, I think you're missing the point. No one here is glorifying his death or drunk driving. Kurt Cobain shot himself in the ****ing face, doesn't mean people don't listen to Nirvana anymore. I can't speak for everyone, but I look at Lindbergh as a sobering (pun intended) reminder of mortality, even from an athlete as talented as him.

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11-08-2010, 02:53 PM
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Originally Posted by hof2120 View Post
Sorry, but I lost my best friend to a drunk driver, she was walking home from my house and got hit. I know you probably don't care much to hear my life story but because of that incident I have no sympathy for anybody willing to get behind the wheel of a car while intoxicated and put other peoples' lives in danger because they're not responsible.

Not drinking and driving doesn't make me PERFECT, it makes me not ****ing retarded. If he wasn't a Flyers goalie you guys wouldn't give a **** about his death, he'd just be another statistic. Him dying is tragic, but the way he died is no one's fault but his own and because he plays for the Flyers doesn't make the means in which he died any more acceptable.

And no, I'm not perfect, I have done things wrong in my life but I've never put another person's life in danger while doing so.



That argument is really flawed. Yeah, I lost somebody I knew and loved, but I have a feeling that's a bit more personal to me than Lindbergh dying is to you.

For the record, I'm not glad he's dead or anything, I agree it's tragic that he made a mistake and died. However, I just don't see praising and honoring a death caused in such a way as appropriate.
Well said.

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Originally Posted by CannonMTG View Post
HOF, I think you're missing the point. No one here is glorifying his death or drunk driving. Kurt Cobain shot himself in the ****ing face, doesn't mean people don't listen to Nirvana anymore. I can't speak for everyone, but I look at Lindbergh as a sobering (pun intended) reminder of mortality, even from an athlete as talented as him.
Even more well said.

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Old
11-08-2010, 04:24 PM
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Sorry, but this is one of those times off-ice drama forever trumps anything he did on the ice.

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Old
11-08-2010, 05:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CannonMTG View Post
HOF, I think you're missing the point. No one here is glorifying his death or drunk driving. Kurt Cobain shot himself in the ****ing face, doesn't mean people don't listen to Nirvana anymore. I can't speak for everyone, but I look at Lindbergh as a sobering (pun intended) reminder of mortality, even from an athlete as talented as him.
I definitely see where you're coming from and I must admit I'm biased based on my personal life experiences, so I apologize for that. I just don't have much of a heart for behavior that not only puts one's own life in danger, but endangers others also. Also, I wasn't alive to see him play or see the impact of his death, so perhaps if I had been my opinion would be different.

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11-08-2010, 05:26 PM
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Luckily enough no one but himself died. Leave it at that. Huge potiental and he truly was a nice guy, i've read that exact book and seen several documentaries and rews reports about and he was the nicest guy.

We all make mistakes, he just did really dumb one costing himself his life :<

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Old
11-08-2010, 05:38 PM
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There's no denying the societal and personal impacts of the subject. There is no way to smooth the feelings of those who lost loved ones in similar ways. I don't think anyone would attempt to do that. It's controversial and likely the determining factor in why the Flyers have never retired the jersey number 31 (equating that with 1, 4, 7 and 16). The memorial service was done as a measure of paying respect to a fallen teammate, son and person. The image of Pelle's dad is forever etched in my memory -- that photo still resonates with me. The other issue is the chronology.

Flyers' fans remember the Saturday night win against Boston in which Bob Froese played. The trade rumors that he was being showcased in a potential deal. The team's record on top of the NHL standings. Then, the initial reports of Sunday morning. Will he return this season? Wait, how serious is this? What happened? It was a process in which hours went into days. We all saw players, people in their 20s, professional on the ice and smiling when a team scored. Outsiders weren't used to seeing these players cry. It was shocking. People get attached to professional athletes, sometimes too closely. Lindbergh was a name.

I remember watching the 1980 Olympics opener between US-Sweden. Not because I wanted to see Eruzione and company as much as I wanted to see this kid the Flyers drafted. I was wowed from that one game. We all were. The 1980 US team was the greatest achievement in the sport's history to many observers (likely, me included) but I will always remember watching part of that first game and having people ask me why I was so interested. Those same people, days later, were all caught up in the euphoria and for obvious and significant reasons -- so was I -- but there was the interest of Pelle for me. Then he became a Flyer. It wasn't all peaches and cream. He struggled at times. Then came the not-so-glorious years of the 1982-84 Flyers' PO runs but we saw promise and potential with Lindbergh as the backbone. People here know how I feel about Mike Keenan and with 1984-85 the swagger returned. Keenan, Smith, Tocchet, Zezel, these newbies added to the returning players like Lindbergh.

Ask people and the reasons will vary but for those of us who recall those days, we saw a young man die. Of course there were two injured people. No one wants to see the innocent hurt but it was Pelle's parents, his fiancee, those faces whose lives were forever altered by his actions. But he paid the biggest price. I will end it with a simple rest in peace.

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Old
11-08-2010, 06:51 PM
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There were about a dozen Flyers players who drove drunk that night. If you are going to condemn Lindbergh, condemn everyone else, too (and, for that matter, condemn the hockey culture of the time, where that was considered normal behavior to go out and have a few -- sometimes more than a few -- and then get behind the wheel). The only real difference is that Pelle crashed and died, and the others made it home.

With the except of Bob Froese, Pelle was actually the least likely player on that team to get involved in a drinking and driving accident. He rarely drank during the season and probably (although we'll never know) only did so that night because Keenan had given the team the next two days off and there was a long break until the next game night against Edmonton.

I'm not saying that what Lindbergh did was excusable or right, but you have to view it in context. The fact that he drove recklessly on a regular basis was actually the single biggest factor in how things ended up for him.

And even if you don't feel sorry for Lindbergh, you have to feel for his parents, Sigge and Anna-Lisa (who less than two years later had to bury another one of their three children after Pelle's older sister, Ann-Christine, lost a long battle with cancer). You have to feel for his fiancee, Kerstin. And you have to feel for all his friends and teammates that he left behind.

One of those friends was Ed Parvin Jr., who was one of the two passengers in the car. Parvin has never blamed Pelle for what happened, and holds no bitterness whatsoever.

In terms of putting a human face on the tragedy, here are photos of Pelle's mom, Anna-Lisa, his then-fiancee Kerstin (red jacket) and his older sister, Ann-Louise (black sweatshirt) at a gravesite memorial earlier this year, on what would have been his 51st birthday. Pelle's sister is also buried there. His father's name is on the other side of the headstone.





Last edited by Bill_Meltzer: 11-08-2010 at 06:57 PM.
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11-08-2010, 11:03 PM
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I remember the day well, hearing that Lindbergh had died. I was 19, and had been a Flyers fan for about 12 years. I was pretty choked up by it, and it drove home how fragile life was.

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Old
11-08-2010, 11:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill_Meltzer View Post
There were about a dozen Flyers players who drove drunk that night. If you are going to condemn Lindbergh, condemn everyone else, too (and, for that matter, condemn the hockey culture of the time, where that was considered normal behavior to go out and have a few -- sometimes more than a few -- and then get behind the wheel). The only real difference is that Pelle crashed and died, and the others made it home.

With the except of Bob Froese, Pelle was actually the least likely player on that team to get involved in a drinking and driving accident. He rarely drank during the season and probably (although we'll never know) only did so that night because Keenan had given the team the next two days off and there was a long break until the next game night against Edmonton.

I'm not saying that what Lindbergh did was excusable or right, but you have to view it in context. The fact that he drove recklessly on a regular basis was actually the single biggest factor in how things ended up for him.

And even if you don't feel sorry for Lindbergh, you have to feel for his parents, Sigge and Anna-Lisa (who less than two years later had to bury another one of their three children after Pelle's older sister, Ann-Christine, lost a long battle with cancer). You have to feel for his fiancee, Kerstin. And you have to feel for all his friends and teammates that he left behind.

One of those friends was Ed Parvin Jr., who was one of the two passengers in the car. Parvin has never blamed Pelle for what happened, and holds no bitterness whatsoever.

In terms of putting a human face on the tragedy, here are photos of Pelle's mom, Anna-Lisa, his then-fiancee Kerstin (red jacket) and his older sister, Ann-Louise (black sweatshirt) at a gravesite memorial earlier this year, on what would have been his 51st birthday. Pelle's sister is also buried there. His father's name is on the other side of the headstone.



Well said Bill. I purchased and read "Behind the White Mask" It was a great read. It gave me a huge perspective of Pelle as a person and a player and I suggest it for anyone who's interested in not only Lindbergh but the Flyers too.

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Old
11-09-2010, 12:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill_Meltzer View Post
There were about a dozen Flyers players who drove drunk that night. If you are going to condemn Lindbergh, condemn everyone else, too (and, for that matter, condemn the hockey culture of the time, where that was considered normal behavior to go out and have a few -- sometimes more than a few -- and then get behind the wheel). The only real difference is that Pelle crashed and died, and the others made it home.

With the except of Bob Froese, Pelle was actually the least likely player on that team to get involved in a drinking and driving accident. He rarely drank during the season and probably (although we'll never know) only did so that night because Keenan had given the team the next two days off and there was a long break until the next game night against Edmonton.

I'm not saying that what Lindbergh did was excusable or right, but you have to view it in context. The fact that he drove recklessly on a regular basis was actually the single biggest factor in how things ended up for him.

And even if you don't feel sorry for Lindbergh, you have to feel for his parents, Sigge and Anna-Lisa (who less than two years later had to bury another one of their three children after Pelle's older sister, Ann-Christine, lost a long battle with cancer). You have to feel for his fiancee, Kerstin. And you have to feel for all his friends and teammates that he left behind.

One of those friends was Ed Parvin Jr., who was one of the two passengers in the car. Parvin has never blamed Pelle for what happened, and holds no bitterness whatsoever.

In terms of putting a human face on the tragedy, here are photos of Pelle's mom, Anna-Lisa, his then-fiancee Kerstin (red jacket) and his older sister, Ann-Louise (black sweatshirt) at a gravesite memorial earlier this year, on what would have been his 51st birthday. Pelle's sister is also buried there. His father's name is on the other side of the headstone.



Very well said, Bill. I really enjoyed the book, it's been passed around my family twice now.

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Old
11-10-2010, 06:51 AM
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What could have been....





Thanks for a good read.
So many memories attached to Pelle's death. I was ten at the time and actually got to stay up later than usual to watch the sports news, there were no NHL games on TV in Sweden back then. I remember footage of Pelle playing for team Sweden (no NHL, I told you), footage of the wall outside of that school and a short glimpse of his Porsche taken away by a semi.

Although I had just about never seen him play it felt really weird he was gone just like that. My father came from the same part of Stockholm and I played games at the same rink Pelle had played in before heading over to NA. And a lot of people around hockey knew him, I bumped in to players, coaches and trainers several years later who had worked with him, knew his parents and so on..

Pelle's fiancee returned to Sweden and worked together with my mother for a couple of years but rarely spoke about him.

It actually warms my heart a little to see him remembered in Philly.

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11-10-2010, 08:35 AM
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The man's death was his own fault. He not only put his life on the line by driving drunk but endangered other people as well. Sure he was good, but he shouldn't be praised and honored. He's not Pat Tillman, he didn't die courageously.
As horrible as this sounds, it's correct. I will condem any drunk driver. When you are a relative of someone who is hit by one of these fools then maybe you will understand.

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11-10-2010, 05:20 PM
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The man's death was his own fault. He not only put his life on the line by driving drunk but endangered other people as well. Sure he was good, but he shouldn't be praised and honored. He's not Pat Tillman, he didn't die courageously.
If I said what I want to say to you I will be banned from this site. How does it feel to be ....... perfect? Let me know cause you are the 1st person who has not made any mistakes in their life. It was terrible about Pat. It was a shame that the government tried to cover has death by "friendly fire" up.

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11-10-2010, 06:13 PM
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It was just hockey culture. Drunk driving just wasn't the issue it is today back then. The idiots at MADD hadn't even gotten the ball rolling on their original noble mission yet.

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11-10-2010, 07:28 PM
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If I said what I want to say to you I will be banned from this site. How does it feel to be ....... perfect? Let me know cause you are the 1st person who has not made any mistakes in their life. It was terrible about Pat. It was a shame that the government tried to cover has death by "friendly fire" up.
Message me then and tell me what you want to say. I don't care. I'm sorry that I don't mourn the death of a man just because he was a Flyers goalie. Let me say this again, if he was just some average joe, none of you would even take the time to read the ****ing obituary. And Tillman died defending this country, a country he gave up his dream to fight for. The 2 aren't even in the same category.

You know what, fine. I'll admit, based on my bias on this subject maybe I should have refrained from posting in here, but I honestly don't see what I said that was so insane. That his death was his fault? Because it was. I'm pretty sure he was the one pounding back the drinks and getting into a car. I will say I feel bad for his family and I feel bad that a single bad decision cut his life short, but the situation could have been avoided very easily.

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