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Ice hockey skate fitting help?

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01-12-2011, 03:25 PM
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DelZottoLover
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Ice hockey skate fitting help?

I received my ice hockey skates today. They are Bauer Vapor X05's in size 6 R. They are sort of wide. I heard in the Vapor lines that R's are equal to D's. That's why I assumed it didn't matter if I bought an R. Well when I put the skate on, my heel was properly locked (at least I think) BUT the sides of the skate didn't fully wrap around my foot securely. Also I have about an inch of toe room in the box. I'm a 6.5 in mens and a 7.5 in women's. I looked at the Vapor ice skate chart and went by my women's size (7.5) so which is equal to a 6 in mens. Should I have gone by my men size in shoes? How in the world are ice hockey skates supposed to fit?! (lol.) I'm obviously a "newb" to the sport. I've always wanted to play as I was little but my parents never let me because they were afraid I would get hurt. They view hockey as a "man's sport". I'm 19 and finally have a chance to play what i've always wanted to play, I enrolled in a women's hockey program which starts next week. It's about 2 hours away, well worth it for me. There aren't no pro ice hockey shops nearby where I live, it's rural. So it's a little hard to get IN PERSON help. I'm a little frustrated but i'm not easily giving up. I always go after what I want.

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01-12-2011, 04:32 PM
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I'm a 7.5 in women's, and my hockey skates are size 4EE. So I'd say your size 6 skates are waaaay too big for you. Can you return them?

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01-12-2011, 04:39 PM
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well, obviously, the best/only way to go to get proper fitting skates is to go to a lhs and get some real help.
since that doesn't sound possible in your case, your next best option is ordering from icewarehouse as they offer free shipping and free returns on skates (as long as they are unsharpened/unbaked/unused).
skate fitting is not an exact science. in other words, just because you are a size X shoe doesn't mean you'll always be a size X skate. skate sizing varies from brand to brand and many times model to model within the same brand. the rule of thumb is that skate size is usually 1.5-2 sizes down from your men's shoe size. but again, this isn't an exact science, i've heard of people who've gone 3+ sizes down from their shoe size.

sounds like you'll need to go down to junior size skates (which is a good thing since skates are considerably cheaper in jr. sizes...unless you're a good bit overweight for your size like me, then lack of stiffness can become an issue).

you need to find skates based on the shape of your foot. some are built wider in the heel, wider in the toe box, wider in both, narrow overall, deep to very deep, shallow...the list goes on...

in proper fitting skates, your heels should be locked in and not able to move up and down at all, but not in pain either. your toes should be just feathering the inside front of the toe cap when standing straight up, and pull back from the front when your knees are bent/in a hockey position. another good way to check for proper length is to slide your foot forward inside the boot(if you can) till your toe(s) is just touching the front, then take a pencil and slide it straight down between your heel and the inside heel of the boot. if the pencil slides in easily with wiggle room, they're too big. if the pencil cannot fit, or if it jams between your heel in the inside of the boot, they're just about right. another test to check for proper depth once you've established the length is correct is to jam your heel back into the skate to make sure your foot is locked in, then take a pencil and lay it across the top of the boot, about 4 eyelets down from the top. if the pencil touches the top of your foot before it touches the boot then it's not deep enough. if there's a considerable amount of space between the pencil and your foot when you've laid the pencil onto the boot(roughly a pencil widthe or more) then they're too deep.

that's just a loose guideline as to what to look for in proper fit, but ultimately, personal preference will also play a role.

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01-12-2011, 06:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beth View Post
I'm a 7.5 in women's, and my hockey skates are size 4EE. So I'd say your size 6 skates are waaaay too big for you. Can you return them?
Yeah I bought them on icewarehouse.com I'll be returning them back tomorrow when I get the shipping label emailed to me. I have a narrow foot so I would need an R or D right? Apparently in the vapor lines from what I heard is that the R's are equal to D's. Is this true?

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01-12-2011, 06:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedonger View Post
well, obviously, the best/only way to go to get proper fitting skates is to go to a lhs and get some real help.
since that doesn't sound possible in your case, your next best option is ordering from icewarehouse as they offer free shipping and free returns on skates (as long as they are unsharpened/unbaked/unused).
skate fitting is not an exact science. in other words, just because you are a size X shoe doesn't mean you'll always be a size X skate. skate sizing varies from brand to brand and many times model to model within the same brand. the rule of thumb is that skate size is usually 1.5-2 sizes down from your men's shoe size. but again, this isn't an exact science, i've heard of people who've gone 3+ sizes down from their shoe size.

sounds like you'll need to go down to junior size skates (which is a good thing since skates are considerably cheaper in jr. sizes...unless you're a good bit overweight for your size like me, then lack of stiffness can become an issue).

you need to find skates based on the shape of your foot. some are built wider in the heel, wider in the toe box, wider in both, narrow overall, deep to very deep, shallow...the list goes on...

in proper fitting skates, your heels should be locked in and not able to move up and down at all, but not in pain either. your toes should be just feathering the inside front of the toe cap when standing straight up, and pull back from the front when your knees are bent/in a hockey position. another good way to check for proper length is to slide your foot forward inside the boot(if you can) till your toe(s) is just touching the front, then take a pencil and slide it straight down between your heel and the inside heel of the boot. if the pencil slides in easily with wiggle room, they're too big. if the pencil cannot fit, or if it jams between your heel in the inside of the boot, they're just about right. another test to check for proper depth once you've established the length is correct is to jam your heel back into the skate to make sure your foot is locked in, then take a pencil and lay it across the top of the boot, about 4 eyelets down from the top. if the pencil touches the top of your foot before it touches the boot then it's not deep enough. if there's a considerable amount of space between the pencil and your foot when you've laid the pencil onto the boot(roughly a pencil widthe or more) then they're too deep.

that's just a loose guideline as to what to look for in proper fit, but ultimately, personal preference will also play a role.
I definitely have them to big then! I'll need to go in juniors. But now from what i'm hearing is that in the vapor lines, the D's and R's are equal. Is this true? I'm trying to figure out whether i'd need an R or D. Any tips on that as well? Thanks.

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01-12-2011, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DelZottoLover View Post
Yeah I bought them on icewarehouse.com I'll be returning them back tomorrow when I get the shipping label emailed to me. I have a narrow foot so I would need an R or D right? Apparently in the vapor lines from what I heard is that the R's are equal to D's. Is this true?
Yeah, that sounds right. I don't know why they label some models of skates with D's and some with R's, but I would assume that would be the same normal width. When I was trying on skates, the vapors were the narrowest, too narrow for my feet, so then I got Easton SE6's in 4EE, and the Bauer supremes in D widths were even wider than those. The brands are all so different, if there's any way to make the trek to try on skates, it would be worth it, even if you have to drive a few hours. Does the rink where you are taking the hockey class have a shop? I'd start there.

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01-12-2011, 10:42 PM
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Fleuryoutside29
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If you can make it to a shop have them measure your foot. They'll know exactly what size you should order even if you don't buy it from them they should be very helpful.

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01-12-2011, 11:59 PM
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How far away is the nearest big hockey shop? It may be worth it to make the trip to a shop to get a proper fitting, at the very least for your first pair of skates. A good fit is everything and you'll know what you need from there on out.

Simply going down X sizes from your shoe size will never get you a good fit. Bauer says go 1.5 down, but I have to go down 3 sizes. Sizes between brands rarely match up and every model fits differently. On top of sizes, each model seems to cater to different feet type (high arch, no arch, high volume, low volume, narrow, wide, etc.) If you don't know what skate line fits your feet you're gonna have a tough time finding a good fit by ordering online. Skates are definitely the opposite of 'one size fits all'.

IceWarehouse does have a great return policy so you can buy and return until you find the right one that way but I would really recommend visiting a shop if you can manage.

Good luck either way. Have fun with hockey. I started late as well (21) and am having a blast.

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01-14-2011, 04:46 PM
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Okay guys so yesterday I bought a used pair of "CCM Tacks 152" I'm assuming these are the older versions. I have pictures below. Anyway, yesterday I did a good job of FORWARD skating only..it was hard to turn and stop with these skates on. The soles have no "rigidity" on them what so ever. The boot fit my foot except I couldn't feel the toe box at all, even when I stood up. Basically my foot stood in the same spot. Also the inside ball at the ankle joint (forgot what it's called) hurt when I pushed off on the inside edges of my skates. I'm not sure if these are just reg skates that LOOK like hockey skates, or maybe it's a replica. I'm not sure... What do you guys think? Because I have heard that there are "fake replica skates" being made out there. Also i'm not sure if this is carbon steel or stainless, does anyone know ? It doesn't say stainless steel on the blade. The guy at Play It Again Sports told me that it was, and I trusted him. Not sure how to tell if it's a one piece holder or two piece either. I know basics, i'm still a beginner though so I don't know everything. Thanks for your guys' help.














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01-15-2011, 01:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DelZottoLover View Post
So it's a little hard to get IN PERSON help. I'm a little frustrated but i'm not easily giving up. I always go after what I want.

Ok, here it comes....

First, when I size people for skates, you NEED room on the sides of your feet so this way the skate doesn't reduce the blood to your toes and them the arch of your feet will hurt. So width is good, but not too much.

Second, place your foot in the boot as forward as it will go. Then look to see how much room you have in the back behind your heel. It should be NO more then the width of your finger. If it is...too big!

Third, when you tie those skates, leave the bottom 4 eyes loose. Then tighten the remainder tight. But not too tight that it doesn't allow you to point your toe. Point your toe at the end of each stride is very important.

Fourth, lace up both skates then once the laces are all within the eye holes grab the end of the lace and tie a knot at the end. This will keep the laces from coming out and then you have to lace the skates again. Yes, I know this doesn't seem important. But as time goes by, that little plastic protector at the end will break off and then you have to tape the ends to make it go through the eye hole. So just tie a knot and you will never have to worry about that again.

Fifth, when you buy your stick, buy the proper stick first. If your write with your right hand, then you shoot left. The artistic side of the stick is at the top. This allows you to have more of an accurate pass. Now, you right hand shooter out there, do freak out by saying you have accuracy and you shoot right...good for you.

Six, tape the blade with black tape...not white. It helps hide the puck better. Yes I know that you shooter out there can hide the puck better with white tape. But, when the goalie has three people standing in front of him and the puck is moving all around, he is going to have to shift his weight from leg to leg to see the puck. So by having black tape on the blade, forces him to make a more accurate assesstment of the play and sometimes that could really be a pain in the a** to see where the puck is!

Seventh, when you buy that stick, most times you will not have your skates with you for the purchase. So to getting the proper stick, will depend on what lie (angle of the shaft and heel) you like, and what kind if blade pattern (curve) you would like the best. Plus, the flex of the stick is the most important part. Don't go and buy a stick because the color is cool. Don't buy a stick that goes past your forehead. If it does, switch to a junior stick. If you buy a stick that just passes your nose...perfect. Then place a mark on the stick just below your nose and that will be the cut line. Now, if you get a large stick and you cut off more then two to three inches, you have now changed the flex point of the stick designed by the manufacture. If you want shooting tips...PM me.

Eighth, when you buy that stick, make sure you use a rasp (file) at the end of the stick once you have cut the stick. No rasp...use a concrete floor. If you do not use a rasp, the sharp edge will help eat a hole in the palm of your glove. No, it doesn't happen over night, but a year later, you will be buying new gloves. So round the corners off....then tape!

Ninth, wax the blade of your stick. Yes, I know a lot of you out there don't use wax, that's fine, just keep more tape in your bag. Why wax? As the game progresses, shaved ice will collect a little on your blade. Then when you go to the bench for a rest, the shaved ice melts. But, once it melts it soaks into the tape. This extra water will change the weight of your stick. Plus, water is the worlds best cleaner. Once the water gets into the tape, it starts to emulsify the gum on the tape and now it doesn't stick. Yes, I know that the tape goes around the blade holding the tape from falling off. But, ice is like sand paper. It will chew the tape off the bottom of the stick and then the tape falls off like a bad hair piece. Waxing helps water proof the tape to keep water from penetrating into the tape.

Tenth, don't ever miss a power skating class!

Good Luck!

Head coach

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Last edited by Headcoach: 01-15-2011 at 01:22 PM.
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01-16-2011, 04:57 PM
  #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Ok, here it comes....

First, when I size people for skates, you NEED room on the sides of your feet so this way the skate doesn't reduce the blood to your toes and them the arch of your feet will hurt. So width is good, but not too much.

Second, place your foot in the boot as forward as it will go. Then look to see how much room you have in the back behind your heel. It should be NO more then the width of your finger. If it is...too big!

Third, when you tie those skates, leave the bottom 4 eyes loose. Then tighten the remainder tight. But not too tight that it doesn't allow you to point your toe. Point your toe at the end of each stride is very important.

Fourth, lace up both skates then once the laces are all within the eye holes grab the end of the lace and tie a knot at the end. This will keep the laces from coming out and then you have to lace the skates again. Yes, I know this doesn't seem important. But as time goes by, that little plastic protector at the end will break off and then you have to tape the ends to make it go through the eye hole. So just tie a knot and you will never have to worry about that again.

Fifth, when you buy your stick, buy the proper stick first. If your write with your right hand, then you shoot left. The artistic side of the stick is at the top. This allows you to have more of an accurate pass. Now, you right hand shooter out there, do freak out by saying you have accuracy and you shoot right...good for you.

Six, tape the blade with black tape...not white. It helps hide the puck better. Yes I know that you shooter out there can hide the puck better with white tape. But, when the goalie has three people standing in front of him and the puck is moving all around, he is going to have to shift his weight from leg to leg to see the puck. So by having black tape on the blade, forces him to make a more accurate assesstment of the play and sometimes that could really be a pain in the a** to see where the puck is!

Seventh, when you buy that stick, most times you will not have your skates with you for the purchase. So to getting the proper stick, will depend on what lie (angle of the shaft and heel) you like, and what kind if blade pattern (curve) you would like the best. Plus, the flex of the stick is the most important part. Don't go and buy a stick because the color is cool. Don't buy a stick that goes past your forehead. If it does, switch to a junior stick. If you buy a stick that just passes your nose...perfect. Then place a mark on the stick just below your nose and that will be the cut line. Now, if you get a large stick and you cut off more then two to three inches, you have now changed the flex point of the stick designed by the manufacture. If you want shooting tips...PM me.

Eighth, when you buy that stick, make sure you use a rasp (file) at the end of the stick once you have cut the stick. No rasp...use a concrete floor. If you do not use a rasp, the sharp edge will help eat a hole in the palm of your glove. No, it doesn't happen over night, but a year later, you will be buying new gloves. So round the corners off....then tape!

Ninth, wax the blade of your stick. Yes, I know a lot of you out there don't use wax, that's fine, just keep more tape in your bag. Why wax? As the game progresses, shaved ice will collect a little on your blade. Then when you go to the bench for a rest, the shaved ice melts. But, once it melts it soaks into the tape. This extra water will change the weight of your stick. Plus, water is the worlds best cleaner. Once the water gets into the tape, it starts to emulsify the gum on the tape and now it doesn't stick. Yes, I know that the tape goes around the blade holding the tape from falling off. But, ice is like sand paper. It will chew the tape off the bottom of the stick and then the tape falls off like a bad hair piece. Waxing helps water proof the tape to keep water from penetrating into the tape.

Tenth, don't ever miss a power skating class!

Good Luck!

Head coach
Good description thanks. Now how do I know if the blades are sharpened correctly or not?

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01-16-2011, 06:27 PM
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If the skates are too wide youre pretty much screwed. As the others said, you can always get skates punched out that are too narrow but theres no way to narrow down skates that are too wide.
Thicker socks arent the answer either because you will never be able to get the snug fit that you need in order for the skates to perform properly.

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01-16-2011, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by DelZottoLover View Post
Now how do I know if the blades are sharpened correctly or not?
If the edges of the blade dont have a lot of nicks in them and if you can see a slight groove in the middle of the blade, they are fine.

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01-16-2011, 08:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DelZottoLover View Post
I received my ice hockey skates today. They are Bauer Vapor X05's in size 6 R. They are sort of wide. I heard in the Vapor lines that R's are equal to D's. That's why I assumed it didn't matter if I bought an R. Well when I put the skate on, my heel was properly locked (at least I think) BUT the sides of the skate didn't fully wrap around my foot securely. Also I have about an inch of toe room in the box. I'm a 6.5 in mens and a 7.5 in women's. I looked at the Vapor ice skate chart and went by my women's size (7.5) so which is equal to a 6 in mens. Should I have gone by my men size in shoes? How in the world are ice hockey skates supposed to fit?! (lol.) I'm obviously a "newb" to the sport. I've always wanted to play as I was little but my parents never let me because they were afraid I would get hurt. They view hockey as a "man's sport". I'm 19 and finally have a chance to play what i've always wanted to play, I enrolled in a women's hockey program which starts next week. It's about 2 hours away, well worth it for me. There aren't no pro ice hockey shops nearby where I live, it's rural. So it's a little hard to get IN PERSON help. I'm a little frustrated but i'm not easily giving up. I always go after what I want.
As a 4 year local hockey shop sales associate, I completely understand what you're going through.

The only necessary advice I can give you is to find a store that you can try anything on at and get your foot measured. If you should be a size 6 D skate in theory, than try a 5.5 D and work your way up or down to what feels the best. You want your foot to be locked in place with zero movement, yet nothing that feels any sort of pain at all. If worst comes to worst and you can't find the skate for you, try using Superfeet. These things work magic on foot problems and before you know it you'll be skating pain free.

Just a heads up, most skates will size down 1 to 1.5 sizes from your normal shoe size, but it's all personal preference. I measure a 9.5 on a foot scale, yet wear a 7.5 so don't worry about going too small.

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