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The 2011 ATD-B Beer League Draft

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Old
01-23-2011, 01:28 PM
  #151
Hedberg
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C Roger Bourbonnais



Why he should be selected:
- Member of IIHF Hall of Fame
- 1964 World Championship All-Star

International Hockey Legends:
Quote:
Though he never played in the National Hockey League, Roger Bourbonnais had one of the most interesting hockey careers.

Bourbonnais had greater interests than just hockey, exploring an early interest in a law career. While he played for the Oil Kings, Bourbonnais enrolled at the University of Alberta. He graduated with a bachelor of arts the same year as he graduated from junior hockey.

Property of the Detroit Red Wings, Bourbonnais turned down annual requests to turn pro. A highly principled man, Bourbonnais didn't feel, and rightly so, that professional hockey players in the 1960s earned a good enough living considering the sacrifices they must make. Knowing that with his education he could get an equal paying job on the streets.

ourbonnais found other options to play hockey and to continue his education. Following his junior career, he joined the newly created Canadian National Team. Run by the legendary Father David Bauer, the "Nats" were created to offer a pro-alternative to players who would rather pursue their educations. In exchange for tuition and board, the players trained together all season long, and would represent Canada at tournaments such as the Olympics and the World Championships. For a player like Bourbonnais, such a team was ideal.

Bourbonnais joined the Nats in 1963. The team was based in Vancouver, where Bourbonnais was admitted to the University of British Columbia's law school. The team would later move camp to Winnipeg, forcing Bourbonnais to transfer to the University of Manitoba.

As you would expect, Bourbonnais' academic schedule was hectic and didn't always mesh well with his hockey training. Bourbonnais would miss weeks of classes at a time. Sometimes he got special permission to miss the classes. Other times he would have a friend duplicate notes and send them to Bourbonnais immediately, whether he was in Canada or Europe.

Bourbonnais was part of the 1964 Olympic team in Innsbruck, Austria. Canada lost 1-0 to the Soviets. A victory would have given Canada a gold medal. The loss, in the Olympics extremely complicated set of rules, meant Canada would finish out of the medals in fourth place. Bourbonnais had 5 assists in 7 games, but the speedy forward did not score a goal.

Bourbonnais would also participate in 4 world championships, winning bronze medals in 1964, 1966 and 1967.

Bourbonnais graduated with his law degree in 1967, and moved back to Edmonton to start his articling. He was given special permission to take a break from his articling so that he could return to the Nats in time to train for the 1968 Olympics in Grenoble. This time Canada would pull out a bronze medal, thanks in part to Bourbonnais 4 goals and 6 points in 7 games. Morris Mott, a Nats teammate who earned a Ph.D in history, described Bourbonnais the player as follows:

"As a player he was a good skater, a solid checker, well balanced on his feet. He had a poor shot. His skating stride was as good as I ever saw. He was the demonstrator for a skating instructional film made back then. He was a low-key person and a good, solid player."

Mott added the following about Bourbonnais, the man:"A very direct type of person, he had certain things he wanted to accomplish, he wanted to be a lawyer. More than the rest of us on the National team, he was career oriented. He knew hew was going to do something besides be a hockey player."

Why he shouldn't be selected:
- International Hockey Legends:
Quote:
He had a poor shot.

Bourbonnais insisted on a one-way contract from the Wings. The team never obliged.

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01-23-2011, 01:29 PM
  #152
seventieslord
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Everyone's grabbing the top all-time scorers left, so I'm just going to make this easy and go with the two guys I've been kicking around the longest as they are actually the highest and 3rd-highest scoring players of all-time remaining:

- Andre Savard, center, was never a minus until his final NHL season. Always a decent producer, strong penalty killer. Produced well in a few situations where he was clearly getting third line minutes. Lasted in the NHL quite a long time in an undistinguished career. Downside? Had one big offensive year but was generally a 35-point guy.

- Carey Wilson, center. Not a very multi-dimensional player, but had 54+ points five times, unprecedented among undrafteds. Just two undrafteds have even done it twice. The downside? Not much besides scoring. And not much offense beyond those five years.

more to come on these two later on.

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Old
01-23-2011, 02:36 PM
  #153
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D Jay Wells



- 1994 Stanley Cup Champion
- Played 1098 games plus 114 playoff games

Legends of Hockey
Quote:
Jay Wells had the reputation for being a rugged defensive stalwart while playing three years of junior hockey with the Kingston Canadians from 1976 to 1979 and his qualities were something the L.A. Kings were in dire need of for their weak defense. The Kings selected Wells with their 1st-round pick, 16th overall in 1979. Wells would spend the next nine NHL seasons clearing the front of the Kings' crease with great success before moving on to the Philadelphia Flyers, where he played two seasons.

He then had a two-year stopover with the Buffalo Sabres before heading on to the bright lights of Broadway where he suited up for the New York Rangers for four years. The highlight of his career came in 1994 when, as a member of the Rangers, he helped the club end a 54-year drought, winning the Stanley Cup in a hard-fought, seven-game series against the Vancouver Canucks.

The best individual season for Wells came in 1985-86 as a member of the Kings, when he scored eleven goals and 31 assists for 42 points. Even more impressive was he was able to produce his highest offensive scoring output while also spending 226 minutes in the penalty box, also a single-season career high.

Wells spent the 1995-96 season in St. Louis, playing 76 games for the Blues. At the age of 37, Wells returned for one more season, suiting up for the Tampa Bay Lightning for 21 games. With his veteran leadership and vast experience, the Lightning wanted him to help tutor some of the club's young, up-and-coming defenseman.


Last edited by Hedberg: 01-25-2011 at 01:19 PM.
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Old
01-23-2011, 03:12 PM
  #154
seventieslord
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Yep, I was thinking it was getting pretty close to wells time. Best attributes are toughness and longevity. Pretty well relied on earlier, but became an enforcer/leader guy later on who played a lot less mintes. Finished off in the 17 minute range for his career. I think there are some better choices, but I also think there is a multitude of already-mentioned guys he is much better than (de vries, lane, klemm, witt, to name a few)

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01-23-2011, 03:21 PM
  #155
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I was going to make a safer pick of a current guy rather than Ehrhoff, but in the spirit of it being the Beer League Draft, I decided against it.

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Old
01-23-2011, 11:24 PM
  #156
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Melville selects Andre Savard, C



Here's a guy who flew under the radar but was a very good player for an undistinguished 790-game NHL career. He was a very consistent 2nd-tier offensive player who had between 38 and 44 points seven times, plus 60 and 74-point seasons. He killed a very respectable 20% of his team's penalties, for teams that were outstanding on the PK (not sure how much of that can be credited to him, though) - He scored 0.49 ajdusted ESPPG which is outstanding for a guy available now. Having been on the ice for just 11% of his team's powerplays, practically all his points were even strength. Suddenly, 482 points in 790 games doesn't look so pedestrian, does it?

Savard was never a minus player until his final NHL season. Always a solid secondary contributor to good teams, he never missed the playoffs in his 12 NHL seasons. His career adjusted +/- of +14 is remarkable considering he started with Orr and Esposito as off-ice comparables, then Perreault and the Ramsay line in their heyday.

A definite option for an underrated two-way second line center at the AAA level.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1982
Give Punch Imlach credit for bringing him to Buffalo... survived demotion to minor leagues to reach full potential last season as outstanding defensive center and penalty killer who cost veteran Don Luce his job... strong forechecker... skilled at winning faceoffs...won Charley Barton Memorial Silver Stick for his love of the game, and Tim Horton Memorial Unsung Hero award last season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1983
Tough little guy who comes to play... underrated as a good two-way forward... will score a big goal or make a big defensive play... will try, try, and try again... biggest problem is consistency... will be up for two weeks and down for three... was groomed as penalty killer, eventually succeeding Don Luce... does all the little things well - faceoffs, defense , backchecking... never quits... showed up at training camp two years ago without a job and was a starter opening night.

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01-23-2011, 11:40 PM
  #157
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Melville selects Carey Wilson, C



Carey Wilson wasn't known as a tough guy or an elite defensive player. He killed 10% of his team's penalties, more than a guy you'd call one dimensional, but also less than his share as a forward. What he did do very well, was put up points. From 1985-1989, Wilson scored from 56 to 77 points, a benchmark no one has reached as often among undrafted players. He was not primarily a finisher or a passer; he did both reasonably well and his goals:assists ratio is normal.

He went to the 1986 finals with Calgary, but he played just 9 games. I'm not sure if this means he was a healthy scratch or he was injured, but considering he was the team's 8th-leading point collector, and just 14 behind leader Dan Quinn, I doubt it was the latter. He got into a decent 52 playoff games, scoring an underwhelming but passable 24 points.

I drafted Wilson thinking I was just getting an offensive center, but it seems he actually used his size well and played very good defense, and his issue was with focus and consistency. When he's on, he's an all-around threat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey
Had solid 72-point rookie season. Played on "dice line" (uniform numbers 11, 22, 33) with Richard Kromm and Colin Patterson...
I should just point out here, that despite having the same ES ice time figures as Patterson and Kromm (which means that they likely did play together all year), the rookie Wilson outscored his linemates at even strength, 60 to 51 & 37. Not too shabby!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1990-91
Wilson is loaded with upper-level finesse skills... an excellent skater, exceptional hands and hockey sense... has good sense around the net and is dangerous if left unguarded... combines all his skills to be an excellent defensive player and also a very smart one, doing the job without taking penalties... superior player in traffic... will maintain his puck control through most all physical situations, is very strong and will outmuscle many opponents along the boards... excellent faceoff man... remarkably conditioned athlete...can be a strong two-way plalyer of above average demeanor... of course, he has to want to be that player... his reputation speaks of his lack of concentration and intensity, questioning his desire to always play at his best level...

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01-24-2011, 07:05 AM
  #158
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Fedor Tyutin



* 6'3 215 lbs, 7 year NHL pro
* Top-3 minutes in NY, Top minutes in Columbus, 21:36 career average
* 2008 World championship gold medal
* 2006 and 2010 Olympian for Team Russia

Quote:
ASSETS: Features an impressive all-around arsenal. Has an ideal body for the defense position and excellent hockey sense. Can play a shutdown role and also play a support role on the power play.

FLAWS: Has mental lapses from time to time, which hinder his ability to maximize his all-around potential. Doesn't use his 6-3 frame enough to gain an edge on opposing forwards.

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01-24-2011, 07:20 AM
  #159
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Shjon Podein



* 11 year NHL pro, 127 NHL playoff games
* 2001 Stanley Cup Champion
* 1997 Stanley Cup Finalist
* 2001 King Clancy Memorial Trophy

Quote:
It was in Philly that Podein established himself as a valuable and versatile special-teams man. And although never blessed with great hands or leg speed, he did succeed in combining a vast reserve of intensity and defensive know-how to become a first-rate penalty killer. He also attained the respect of his teammates as a team leader by example in the dressing room.

During his five seasons with the Flyers, Podein helped his club regain a playoff presence that peaked with a trip to the Stanley Cup finals against the Wings in 1997. In 1998-99, he was traded to the Colorado Avalanche in exchange for Keith Brown. In Denver, Podein assumed his usual role as one of the Avs' penalty-killing kingpins. His hard work and intensity brought big results in the form of a Stanley Cup victory in 2000-01. Following Colorado's Stanley Cup victory in 2001, he was traded to the St. Louis Blues midway through the 2001-02 season and remains one of the premier defensive players on the Blues roster.

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01-24-2011, 09:03 AM
  #160
seventieslord
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Melville selects:

Arne Stromberg, coach of the Swedish National team for over a decade. Stromberg is said to have built the Swedish hockey program. Only once did he fail to medal at an international event. He had very few players who have been mentioned in the draft, compared to his Soviet and Czech counterparts. His win% was over .800 internationally.

and, with all this goon talk going on, I'm really surprised no one has selected Chris Simon, LW, who, more than any supposed goon, really proved he could play more of a role, particularly scoring. His 0.40 adjusted ESPPG is higher than a lot of players you wouldn't think it would be higher than.

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Old
01-24-2011, 03:14 PM
  #161
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C Russ Blinco



125 points in 268 career NHL games
1x Stanley Cup Champion
34th in points among forwards during career(top 40 all selected)
1x Top 10 GPG (6)
1933-1934 Calder Trophy Winner
1x NHL All-Star Game Participant(Howie Morenz Memorial Game)

Quote:
Centre Russ Blinco was a clever goal scorer and playmaker who spent six years in the NHL during the 1930s. In addition to his offensive gifts, he was one of the cleanest players in the league.

Born in Grand'Mere, Quebec, Blinco played with the local Maroons in 1928-29 before joining the Brooklyn Crescents of the USAHA for three years. He scored 13 goals in 28 games with the senior Windsor Bulldogs in 1932-33 before embarking on his NHL career.

Blinco scored 23 points in 31 games for the Montreal Maroons and was presented the Calder trophy in 1934. During his second big-league season he helped the club win its second Stanley Cup. Blinco's exemplary two- way play was complemented by linemates Earl Robinson and Dave Trottier. In 1937, he took part in the Howie Morenz Memorial Game when the Canadiens and Maroons faced off against the NHL all-stars.

The talented forward was a mainstay on the Maroons roster through the 1937-38 season. Prior to 1938-39, he and teammates Baldy Northcott and Earl Robinson were sent to Chicago for cash. The tough economic times of the 1930s which already killed off the Ottawa Senators and Pittsburgh Pirates had finally claimed the Maroons. Blinco played the full 48-game slate for the Hawks before retiring.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=12016

Quote:
As a rookie Russ Blinco sure caught the eye of the National Hockey League.

A clever though quiet regular of the Montreal Maroons in the 1930s, Blinco's inaugural season in 1933-34 saw him named as the NHL's rookie of the year. He scored 14 goals and 23 points in 31 games that year, only the second year the NHL awarded the Calder trophy.

The native of Grand'mere Quebec had bigger trophies in mind in his sophomore season. He would score a career high 27 points in a full 48 game schedule, including a 4 goal game agains the New York Americans. He would add 2 goals and 4 points in 7 playoff contests, his second goal was the game winner in game two of Maroon's three game sweep of Toronto in the Stanley Cup finals. It was the last Stanley Cup title in Montreal Maroons history.

Blinco would continue to toil with the Maroons for three more seasons. The Maroons faced increasing financial difficulties as the Great Depression's grip held firm.

By August of 1938 the Maroons had suspended operations and began selling off their players. Blinco, Baldy Northcott and Earl Robinson were sold to Chicago for $30,000.

Blinco would play just one season in Chicago before retiring.

Blinco retired having scored 59 goals and 66 assists for 125 points in 259 career NHL games. Blinco was described an intelligent pivot known for his gentlemanly play and proficient effectiveness. He often played with wingers Robinson and Dave Trottier.
http://montrealmaroons.blogspot.com/...ss-blinco.html

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01-24-2011, 03:23 PM
  #162
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C/RW Dave McLlwain



7th Selke voting in 89-90
207 points in 501 career NHL games
1x 1st in NHL in SHG(89-90)

Quote:
Speedy Dave McLlwain was a well travelled hockeyist. The Seaforth, Ontario native played in over 500 National Hockey League games with six teams - two of which he toiled with on two different occasions.

Dave enjoyed a successful junior hockey career in the OHL with the Kitchener Rangers and North Bay Centennials. In his final year of junior he scored 46 goals and 119 points and represented Canada at the World Junior Championships. The following season, 1987-88, Dave would make the Pittsburgh Penguins and enjoyed an 11 goal, 19 point rookie season. However he would suffer the sophomore jinx in 1988-89 and spent most of the year tearing up the minor leagues.

A summer time trade saw the lean Dave head to Winnipeg with Randy Cunneyworth and Rick Tabaracci in exchange for Jim Kyte, Andrew McBain and Randy Gilhen. Dave responded very positively, scoring a career high 25 goals and 51 points in a full 80 games. However it wasn't his offense that would become his trademark. Rather his speed and faceoff abilities made him a good role player and penalty killer. He enthusiastically hustled on every shift, and while he wasn't overly big he had an element of scrappiness. Dave never came close to reproducing the offensive success he found in that 1989-90 season. In 1990-91 he slumped to 14 goals and 25 points.

In 1991-92 Dave learned to live out of a hotel room as he became a member of the rare club of players who played with 4 different NHL teams in one season. Just 3 games into the season the Jets traded Dave to Buffalo in a trade which also saw Gord Donnelly come to Buffalo in exchange for Darrin Shannon, Mike Hartman and Dean Kennedy. However Dave's stay in Buffalo was very short and just as unmemorable as he donned the Blue and Gold Sabres jerseys for just 5 lonely games. He was subsequently included in the huge trade which saw Pierre Turgeon leave to Long Island in exchange for Pat Lafontaine. Dave played well in 54 games with the Isles but wouldn't finish the season in New York. The Toronto Maple Leafs acquired his playing rights at the trading deadline.

Like so many Ontario boys, Dave achieved a childhood dream by donning the Maple Leafs' blue jersey. He would spend a full season in Toronto before he would join the Ottawa Senators in 1993. He would enjoy relative stability in the Canadian national capital as he spent parts of 3 seasons in Ottawa before returning to Pittsburgh in 1996. A brief appearance with the Islanders in 1996-97 effectively ended his NHL career, however he continued to play professional hockey - first in the minor leagues before discovering professional hockey in Germany and Switzerland.

Dave played in a total of 501 NHL games, collecting 100 goals and 107 assists for 207 points. His speed and defensive consciousness attracted interest from several NHL employers, however his shortcomings in other areas of his game forced him to keep the change-of-address cards handy at all times.
http://winnipegjetslegends.blogspot....-mcllwain.html


Last edited by BillyShoe1721: 01-24-2011 at 03:37 PM.
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Old
01-24-2011, 04:14 PM
  #163
seventieslord
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I like the McLlwain pick. not so thrilled about Blinco though. When I see something like this, this far into the draft:

Quote:
34th in points among forwards during career(top 40 all selected)
it doesn't impress me much... if it was something like 24th, with the whole top-40 selected, I'd sing a different tune. Of course, that's all speaking from an offensive standpoint... Blinco did apparently have a good two-way game to go along with it so I can see his usefulness here.

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01-24-2011, 04:36 PM
  #164
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
I like the McLlwain pick. not so thrilled about Blinco though. When I see something like this, this far into the draft:

it doesn't impress me much... if it was something like 24th, with the whole top-40 selected, I'd sing a different tune. Of course, that's all speaking from an offensive standpoint... Blinco did apparently have a good two-way game to go along with it so I can see his usefulness here.
Well, how about there is only one other guy in the top 49 that hasn't been selected?

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01-24-2011, 06:20 PM
  #165
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
Well, how about there is only one other guy in the top 49 that hasn't been selected?
meh... maybe if there was NO guys in the top-49 available! To say for sure I guess I'd have to analyze a few of my own picks and see how much they stand out among undrafteds in the same time period.

also, getting down this low, I can't help but feel that the "next-best" offensive guys were probably not the next-best NHL guys, they were probably playing somewhere else... probably the minors, maybe senior, possibly Europe.

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01-24-2011, 06:46 PM
  #166
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D Jiri Fischer



- 2002 Stanley Cup Champion
- 2005 World Championship Gold Medal

Legends of Hockey
Quote:
2001-02 saw Fischer suit up for 80 games while playing an expanded role with more minutes. Paired with three-time Norris Trophy winner Chris Chelios, the 6'5 defenseman scored two goals and eight assists helping the Red Wings roll to a President's Trophy as the league's top team in the regular season. Fischer had just five playoff games to his credit before he began the 2002 post-season where his steady play and hard shot helped the Wings capture their third Stanley Cup in six years.
If Fischer's career wasn't ended by heart problems, he would have been a great physical top 4 guy with a cannon of a shot.


Last edited by Hedberg: 01-25-2011 at 01:16 PM.
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01-25-2011, 11:49 AM
  #167
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LW Paul Ranheim



Why:
- Most shorthanded goals of any remaining player

Calgary Flames Legends:
Quote:
Ranheim became a top defensive player. His speed obviously allowed him to keep up with any defensive assignment. He played a solid physical game, although he was not much of an initiator. He had good defensive reads and good anticipation, making him a fixture on the penalty kill.
Legends of Hockey
Quote:
He played a well-rounded game balanced by impeccably sound defensive coverage in his own zone plus versatility up front as a quick-skating winger who could skate on either side of centre. He also packed a pretty decent wrist shot that made his Flames' stint the most offensively prolific of his career.

Near the end of the 1993-94 campaign, however, his role underwent a shift with his trade to the Hartford Whalers. His new assignment was more in the vein of a defensive specialist. His offensive numbers naturally declined while his team remained on the outside looking in at the playoffs each year. Ranheim made the transition from Hartford to Carolina in 1997 and remained with the club until his trade to the Philadelphia Flyers in 2000.
Why he shouldn't be selected:
- No offence
Flames Legends:
Quote:
While his speed created many scoring opportunities at the University of Wisconsin and in the minor leagues, at the NHL level he just lacked creativity and hand skills to be much of an offensive force. He merited little power play time, partly because his shot was astonishingly inaccurate.


Last edited by Hedberg: 01-25-2011 at 01:15 PM.
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01-25-2011, 01:14 PM
  #168
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RW Kevin McClelland



Why:
- 4x Stanley Cup Champion

Edmonton Oilers Heritage
Quote:
Throughout the National Hockey League, Kevin McClelland's name is synonymous with tough physical hockey. Edmonton fans remember McClelland as a player who scored one of the most important goals in Oilers history In Game 1 of the 1984 Stanley Cup finals, he netted the 1-0 winner in an Edmonton win over the defending-champion New York Islanders. In the previous season the Islanders routed the Oilers in the 1983 final, winning the Cup in the minimum four games. McClelland’s goal the next year boosted the Oilers and eventually the team won the Stanley Cup.
Edmonton Oilers Legends:
Quote:
A strong skater with a good burst of speed, McClelland had next to no offensive skills to bring to the Oilers. But he excelled at the physical game. One of the strongest players to ever play in the NHL, Kevin loved to hit. He'd hit anyone anywhere, and was literally fearless. His yeoman effort in the NHL trenches was crucial to the Oilers success. His hard work and enthusiasm made him a natural leader on 4 Stanley Cup championship teams. He would do anything to win, and was a willing and able fighter.
Why he shouldn't be selected:
- Little offence and greatly benefited from being on the right team at the right time

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01-25-2011, 01:27 PM
  #169
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Melville selects Jan Klapac, F



Klapac appears to have been a pretty skilled Czech forward from the 1960s and 1970s. He was small and appeared to be very goals-biased, meaning he was likely a winger. (another czech forward I considered who played at the exact same time, had a G:A ratio of 1.89:1, Klapac's was 2.93:1.

Why:

- 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 6th in Czech league scoring
- 405 points in 355 games from 1962-1977 that we know about
- Got into a decent 47 international games
- 15 points in 10 games in the 1972 Olympics, in a 5-way tie for 3rd in the tournament and 3-way tie for 1st on Czechs with Holik & Nedomansky

Why not:

- He's not profiled anywhere - is he obscure, or just insignificant?
- Despite high scoring, was not a factor in golden stick voting, although that only started when he was 27 and no one available was really a factor in it.
- Was not a huge producer internationally, just 29 points in 47 games, or 14 in 37 aside from 1972
- No idea how he played, or even conclusively which forward position.


Last edited by seventieslord: 01-25-2011 at 02:25 PM.
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01-25-2011, 01:28 PM
  #170
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Both Ranheim and McClelland were potential Melville 4th liners.

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01-25-2011, 01:42 PM
  #171
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Melville selects Bobby Guindon, LW



Guindon is noted by legendsofhockey.net to have been an "important two-way forward" and he contributed to a ton of WHA team success; namely, four Avco Cups.

Why:

- has some defensive acumen
- 0.67 PPG in the playoffs in the WHA
- Four Avco Cups, also a two-time finalist, in just 7 seasons. Can all that team success be brushed away as luck, or right-place-right-time?
- 1978 WHA Playoff MVP though outscored by Hedberg and Nilsson.

Why not:

- Very underwhelming offensively, career 0.55 PPG in the WHA
- faded instantly at age 29 upon merger of NHL and WHA
- more info substantiating his defense would be great.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1975
A driving LW whose rushes for the puck send hockey fans scurrying for their programs... every team in the league could use Guindon, certainly the most underrated at his position...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1979
A central figure in Winnipeg's drive to the championship... fiercely competitive individual... excellent team man.


Last edited by seventieslord: 01-27-2011 at 12:29 AM.
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Old
01-25-2011, 02:10 PM
  #172
MadArcand
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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Melville selects Jan Klapac, F



Klapac appears to have been a pretty skilled Czech forward from the 1960s and 1970s. He was small and appeared to be very goals-biased, meaning he was likely a winger. (another czech forward I considered who played at the exact same time, had a G:A ratio of 1.89:1, Klapac's was 2.93:1.

Why:

- 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 6th in Czech league scoring
- 405 points in 355 games from 1962-1977 that we know about
- Got into a decent 47 international games
- 15 points in 10 games in the 1972 Olympics, in a 5-way tie for 3rd in the tournament and 3-way tie for 1st on Czechs with Holik & Nedomansky

Why not:

- He's not profiled anywhere - is he obscure, or just insignificant?
- Despite high scoring, was not a factor in golden stick voting, although that only started when he was 27 and no one available was really a factor in it.
- Was not a huge producer offensively, just 29 points in 47 games, or 14 in 37 aside from 1972
- No idea how he played, or even conclusively which forward position.
Hard to believe, but even searching 10 pages of Czech Google results gave me virtually no more info - aside from his scoring numbers in Czech league and the fact he won 7 league titles, the only relevant info I found was that he played with the Holik brothers in NT in 1972 - which makes him most likely a RW.

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Old
01-25-2011, 02:12 PM
  #173
Hedberg
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C Anders Andersson

Why:
- 132 International Games
- One of three players (Forsberg and Leif Holmqvist the others) to win the Guldpucken twice (he did it in 1961 and 1962)
- 1957 and 1962 World Championship Gold Medal

Bad Google Translation
Quote:
Akka' was a superb tactician and a tough driving force
Why he shouldn't be selected
- Played only sparingly in the 1957 Gold Medal win
- Little information on his career

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Old
01-25-2011, 02:12 PM
  #174
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You've probably seen this article already seventies, but here's a bit on Guindon:

Unknown Guindon Jets' Big Star

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Old
01-25-2011, 02:24 PM
  #175
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MadArcand View Post
Hard to believe, but even searching 10 pages of Czech Google results gave me virtually no more info - aside from his scoring numbers in Czech league and the fact he won 7 league titles, the only relevant info I found was that he played with the Holik brothers in NT in 1972 - which makes him most likely a RW.
"The most famous student of Karlovy Vary in the post-war years, Kalpac was born in Western Bohemia and immigrated with his parents at four years old, living in a house opposite the soccer stadium at Market Hall. Straight from the window, he could watch legendary (soccer) players like Freiberga, Šinágla, Feureisela and more. Particularly excelled on offense, and repeatedly was the best scorer throughout competition. During military service he joined Dukla Jihlava where he played 15 seasons, including seven championships. Klapac was also a regular player with the national team which won the 1972 World Championship."

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