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Old
03-15-2011, 09:39 PM
  #26
BlackNYellow
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Awesome posts and great tips from all of you as usual!

So today I did a pick-up game that was more or less stick time, a whopping total of 3 people. So we did some passing, shooting, skating, etc.

I was working on my wrist shots as I have been, I had a fellow there who allowed me to try his stick, whether it be that it had a bit more flex than mine or that the curve was a lot more than mine was, I was able to get some high, 'lifted', wristers. So with that being said, I take it with me being a smaller guy and that, that flex was a lot less (80-85) as compared to mine which is near 95-ish, I was able to get more flex or whip and actually be able to flex the stick.

Kind of a lot of ramble, mumbo jumbo above, basically the fellow had a Warrior Bandito stick with an 85 flex and a Toews curve. I have a Bauer One20 PM9 (not much of a curve at all) with a 95 flex. Any ideas as to why with one stick with a lot more flex and a larger curve I was able to lift almost without effort? And should I go get a stick with a larger curve such as his? Or would that be bad practice?

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03-15-2011, 09:55 PM
  #27
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Just use whatever curve you feel most comfortable with. The PM9 is indeed a very flat curve, great for backhands and slappers, but for puck handling and wrist shots a deeper curve can help. Keep in mind that your preferences could change as you improve, if you're just learning I'd keep purchases cheap, buy something better when you know just what you want. Honestly an 85 flex Sherwood 5030 wood stick with a Coffey curve might work well for you, it's a very whippy stick (definitely feels whippier than your average 85 flex composite IMO) with a real big curve, and is only about $30. If you're a smaller guy and just learning a 95 flex is indeed pretty stiff, it's gonna be hard for you to get much flex out of such a stiff stick (though honestly it's gonna be hard for you to get much flex out of any stick until you get nice and comfortable on your skates).

Curve and flex are all personal preference, but in general lower flexes and deeper curves will tend to be better for wrist shots, and stiffer flexes and flatter curves better for slap shots.

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03-15-2011, 09:59 PM
  #28
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the extra length and flex would likely help you elevate the puck. you will however lose some ability to stickhandle. as a kid i struggled with my shot for the longest time and i only finally mastered it with a long whippy stick. my father had always made me use a short one for passing and stickhandling. once you have the technique down you will be able to shorten the length of the stick.
get a bucket of pucks and find somewhere to fire them is the best advice i can give.

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03-16-2011, 02:05 PM
  #29
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Originally Posted by theguru View Post
the extra length and flex would likely help you elevate the puck. you will however lose some ability to stickhandle. as a kid i struggled with my shot for the longest time and i only finally mastered it with a long whippy stick. my father had always made me use a short one for passing and stickhandling. once you have the technique down you will be able to shorten the length of the stick.
get a bucket of pucks and find somewhere to fire them is the best advice i can give.
That is true, been trying to practice as much as I can off ice, though here in AZ it is heating up and quickly :p

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03-18-2011, 03:35 AM
  #30
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Everything has been said already and it's just up to you to practice, practice, practice!

However I just had to comment on the maximum of 7 skaters for weekday pick up games for you! That's awful! I skate in a couple different leagues as well as some decent (and not so decent) pick up games but they're always packed from 18-26 on average. I hope skating isn't this scarce when I move to Socal next year.

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03-19-2011, 09:56 AM
  #31
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Everything has been said already and it's just up to you to practice, practice, practice!

However I just had to comment on the maximum of 7 skaters for weekday pick up games for you! That's awful! I skate in a couple different leagues as well as some decent (and not so decent) pick up games but they're always packed from 18-26 on average. I hope skating isn't this scarce when I move to Socal next year.
Yeah weekly pick-ups are never more than a total of 7. Unless of course kids are out of school. Which even then you have to be a minimum age of 18 to play pick-up.

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03-19-2011, 10:35 AM
  #32
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Alright, so it is understood that I should be trying my hardest to concentrate on proper form and technique (as I am new, duh) and that I should be transferring weight from my right leg to my left leg (back to front, as I am right handed, well have a right handed shot). But it seems that the 'lift' cannot be generated when going from right to left (legs again) but when I shoot and keep my weight on my left leg it seems that my shot gets the lift and essentially more overall power. I will try and get a video (which mind you I may look worse off than a 5 year old shooting, but oh well) to demonstrate what I mean. So basically all in all my shot seems better when using the improper leg to push off with, has anyone else experienced this?

Not to point fingers or anything and not to make a huge deal about it, but when reading Jeremys how to hockey article on the wrist shot it seems that he also shoots off the opposite foot in those pictures, is this bad practice?

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03-19-2011, 01:13 PM
  #33
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Originally Posted by BlackNYellow View Post
Alright, so it is understood that I should be trying my hardest to concentrate on proper form and technique (as I am new, duh) and that I should be transferring weight from my right leg to my left leg (back to front, as I am right handed, well have a right handed shot). But it seems that the 'lift' cannot be generated when going from right to left (legs again) but when I shoot and keep my weight on my left leg it seems that my shot gets the lift and essentially more overall power. I will try and get a video (which mind you I may look worse off than a 5 year old shooting, but oh well) to demonstrate what I mean. So basically all in all my shot seems better when using the improper leg to push off with, has anyone else experienced this?

Not to point fingers or anything and not to make a huge deal about it, but when reading Jeremys how to hockey article on the wrist shot it seems that he also shoots off the opposite foot in those pictures, is this bad practice?
If you are shooting right there's no way your weight should be on your left (outside) leg the whole time, that is simply poor technique and you should stop doing that immediately. On a traditional wrist shot your weight transfers from your inside (right) to outside (left) leg through the course of the shot, you don't just stand on your outside foot the whole time, ever. Note that this weight transfer starts early, just before you really get into the shooting motion, but continues through the shot. Watch what Cammalleri does in these shots, really shows when in the shot your weight should be transferring:



As for Jeremy shooting off the inside foot, this is a different type of wrist/snap shot. Shooting off the inside foot gives you a quicker, less predictable/obvious release, definitely a VERY useful shot for fooling dmen and goalies as it's an easier shot to conceal in your skating stride (much less set up time), but it's also a harder shot to master/get good power with. When you're learning I'd suggest sticking with the traditional, slower release (where your weight ends up on your outside foot), and once you get that down you can start practicing the quick release (where your weight ends up on your inside foot).

And again, really just focus on good technique and good power, the lift on the shots will come. If you focus too much on raising the puck at all costs you'll just end up with a weak fluttery shot that you chip up instead of powering through. Also work like crazy on skating/edge control, your skating will make you a good hockey player FAR more than your shot will, and you need to be very comfortable on your skates/edges to be able to shoot well regardless.

It takes a long time and a lot of work to get decent at hockey, but it's completely worth it as this sport is TONNES of fun!

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03-19-2011, 01:19 PM
  #34
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Originally Posted by ponder View Post
If you are shooting right there's no way your weight should be on your left (outside) leg the whole time, that is simply poor technique and you should stop doing that immediately. On a traditional wrist shot your weight transfers from your inside (right) to outside (left) leg through the course of the shot, you don't just stand on your outside foot the whole time, ever. Note that this weight transfer starts early, just before you really get into the shooting motion, but continues through the shot. Watch what Cammalleri does in these shots, really shows when in the shot your weight should be transferring:



As for Jeremy shooting off the inside foot, this is a different type of wrist/snap shot. Shooting off the inside foot gives you a quicker, less predictable/obvious release, definitely a VERY useful shot for fooling dmen and goalies as it's an easier shot to conceal in your skating stride (much less set up time), but it's also a harder shot to master/get good power with. When you're learning I'd suggest sticking with the traditional, slower release (where your weight ends up on your outside foot), and once you get that down you can start practicing the quick release (where your weight ends up on your inside foot).

And again, really just focus on good technique and good power, the lift on the shots will come. If you focus too much on raising the puck at all costs you'll just end up with a weak fluttery shot that you chip up instead of powering through. Also work like crazy on skating/edge control, your skating will make you a good hockey player FAR more than your shot will, and you need to be very comfortable on your skates/edges to be able to shoot well regardless.

It takes a long time and a lot of work to get decent at hockey, but it's completely worth it as this sport is TONNES of fun!
Definitely understood. I work a butt load on my skating, or have, far more than I have with stickhandling. I still continue to practice skating and techniques, etc. I realize my shot(s) will come in time, I just get antsy as I believe all humans do, it is natural to want to achieve something instantly. Thank you though for the much appreciated advice!

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03-19-2011, 01:21 PM
  #35
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Originally Posted by BlackNYellow View Post
Alright, so it is understood that I should be trying my hardest to concentrate on proper form and technique (as I am new, duh) and that I should be transferring weight from my right leg to my left leg (back to front, as I am right handed, well have a right handed shot). But it seems that the 'lift' cannot be generated when going from right to left (legs again) but when I shoot and keep my weight on my left leg it seems that my shot gets the lift and essentially more overall power. I will try and get a video (which mind you I may look worse off than a 5 year old shooting, but oh well) to demonstrate what I mean. So basically all in all my shot seems better when using the improper leg to push off with, has anyone else experienced this?

Not to point fingers or anything and not to make a huge deal about it, but when reading Jeremys how to hockey article on the wrist shot it seems that he also shoots off the opposite foot in those pictures, is this bad practice?
You just need to keep working at it. You'll note in many videos that they say the basic wrist shot should be executed using weight transfer back and front, and snapping your wrists with a nice clean follow through. If you look at guys who have been playing the game for years, or even pros, they rarely take this type of shot in this exact manner. Instead, they produce all sorts of variations of shots, and practice from different stances and positions.

What is important though is that you have a good understanding of how this shot works because it's going to teach you the fundamentals for different types of shots. For instance, a snap shot or a clapper generally involves a lot of snapping of the wrists and you need to have an idea of how the puck is going to come off of your blade, and how to aim it. A slapshot for example requires a really good back to front transition of weight, and you need to balance yourself correctly as you're executing proper form.


In regards to your problem lifting the puck when trying to shift weight. Try 2 things, 1: On your release try to use your left hand (top of the stick as you're a righty) to pull backwards on the stick more to give it some extra acceleration and lift. 2: When prepping the shot and you're supposed to have the blade closed, try closing it even more than usual so the puck is pulled inwards a bit more and it's tight to the blade. If you do this, then it should start rolling along your blade a bit easier and should allow you to get more lift off the blade.

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03-19-2011, 01:44 PM
  #36
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Definitely understood. I work a butt load on my skating, or have, far more than I have with stickhandling. I still continue to practice skating and techniques, etc. I realize my shot(s) will come in time, I just get antsy as I believe all humans do, it is natural to want to achieve something instantly. Thank you though for the much appreciated advice!
No doubt, definitely 100% natural to want to improve as quickly as possible. As you said your shot will come with time, just keep practicing with the proper technique and you'll eventually have a good shot, but don't get too frustrated if it takes quite a while to develop a decent shot, because it almost certainly will

If you're having trouble with the weight transfer, how is your edge control and balance in general? Do you feel natural performing two footed hockey stops in both directions? If not, make this a priority, it'll help not just your stopping specifically but your edge control and balance as a whole, which will help all aspects of your game, including shooting. It's almost impossible to shoot well without being very balanced and comfortable on your edges.

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03-19-2011, 02:36 PM
  #37
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No doubt, definitely 100% natural to want to improve as quickly as possible. As you said your shot will come with time, just keep practicing with the proper technique and you'll eventually have a good shot, but don't get too frustrated if it takes quite a while to develop a decent shot, because it almost certainly will

If you're having trouble with the weight transfer, how is your edge control and balance in general? Do you feel natural performing two footed hockey stops in both directions? If not, make this a priority, it'll help not just your stopping specifically but your edge control and balance as a whole, which will help all aspects of your game, including shooting. It's almost impossible to shoot well without being very balanced and comfortable on your edges.
I feel pretty descent on my skates and with my stops. Of course there is always that one stringer side, but I have been working to improve my less dominant side as well as shooting and skating. But for the most part I feel pretty comfortable on the ice, there are times when I start to feel some pressure when playing a mini game (since we never have enough for a full game) where I might trip up if not paying attention to everything that is going on. By trip up I mean I might slide out or simply lose my edge on a stop and topple over, which again doesn't happen to often but it will happen maybe once per pick-up.

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03-19-2011, 03:57 PM
  #38
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I have a question. How are you wristers on dry land?

The reason why I ask is because I learned hockey from the street level back in my elementary school days. Of course, when I started ice when I was young, it was just a matter of transition.

But the key thing was, I didn't need to learn how to shoot - I just needed to learn how to translate my street game and onto ice (which is why a lot of ppl are saying maybe it's your comfortability in your skating that's holding you back, not necessarily your technique)

You dont have to be on an ice rink to practice your wristers (your wrist curl & front to back weight transfer), but you do have to be on an ice rink to put it together with your skating and make it a game applicable skill.


At the very least, are you at least practicing in your driveway? If it makes you feel better, I stickhandle in my linoleum kitchen when I have the itch and my games, or pickup nights are still days away. It drives my wife nuts. In your case, maybe it's time to do some damage to the good ol' clothes dryer

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03-20-2011, 01:17 PM
  #39
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I have a question. How are you wristers on dry land?

The reason why I ask is because I learned hockey from the street level back in my elementary school days. Of course, when I started ice when I was young, it was just a matter of transition.

But the key thing was, I didn't need to learn how to shoot - I just needed to learn how to translate my street game and onto ice (which is why a lot of ppl are saying maybe it's your comfortability in your skating that's holding you back, not necessarily your technique)

You dont have to be on an ice rink to practice your wristers (your wrist curl & front to back weight transfer), but you do have to be on an ice rink to put it together with your skating and make it a game applicable skill.


At the very least, are you at least practicing in your driveway? If it makes you feel better, I stickhandle in my linoleum kitchen when I have the itch and my games, or pickup nights are still days away. It drives my wife nuts. In your case, maybe it's time to do some damage to the good ol' clothes dryer
Heh yeah my dry land shots I would almost say are far worse than what they are on ice, not sure as to why. I got a random piece of white board material (a whole white board really, that is about 4' x 3' and I shoot in my backyard and that is where I practice when I am off the ice (which ice time for me is typically Tu and Thu). So yes I have been practicing off ice and I can say I think I try to hard or concentrate to hard off ice on shooting that is what makes it worse. On ice I just.. shoot and it seems they are a little better there on ice. heh.

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04-08-2011, 11:21 AM
  #40
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Heh yeah my dry land shots I would almost say are far worse than what they are on ice, not sure as to why. I got a random piece of white board material (a whole white board really, that is about 4' x 3' and I shoot in my backyard and that is where I practice when I am off the ice (which ice time for me is typically Tu and Thu). So yes I have been practicing off ice and I can say I think I try to hard or concentrate to hard off ice on shooting that is what makes it worse. On ice I just.. shoot and it seems they are a little better there on ice. heh.
So, it has actually taken a complete 360 turn as far as off ice and on ice goes. So off ice (my backyard) I can take wrist shots and lift them with ease (not sure what I have done differently but I am getting used to the motion). I tried yesterday at pick-up to lift my shots and I can get them once in a while, but I think I may be holding the stick differently or something on ice as I am a bit 'higher' with the skates on. Not to sure, either way I am having some issues transferring off ice skills to the ice. It may be the height of the skates, or positioning. Also when off ice I can stand facing my target both feet looking like ( | | ) but on ice I cant seem to shoot 'facing my target' if I want the puck to lift I have to stand perpendicular towards the net. Make sense at all?

Maybe it is my balance on the skates on ice not to sure but I am definitely still trying to practice more and more.

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04-08-2011, 11:59 AM
  #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackNYellow View Post
So, it has actually taken a complete 360 turn as far as off ice and on ice goes. So off ice (my backyard) I can take wrist shots and lift them with ease (not sure what I have done differently but I am getting used to the motion). I tried yesterday at pick-up to lift my shots and I can get them once in a while, but I think I may be holding the stick differently or something on ice as I am a bit 'higher' with the skates on. Not to sure, either way I am having some issues transferring off ice skills to the ice. It may be the height of the skates, or positioning. Also when off ice I can stand facing my target both feet looking like ( | | ) but on ice I cant seem to shoot 'facing my target' if I want the puck to lift I have to stand perpendicular towards the net. Make sense at all?

Maybe it is my balance on the skates on ice not to sure but I am definitely still trying to practice more and more.
It could be weight transfer, it could be the difference in the height of the skates throwing you off a little, try bending knees, get a little lower when on ice


Are you wearing your gloves when you practice off ice? When I was younger I had problems shooting with gloves on when I was learning, just keep practicing, once you get it- you'll remember it even if you take 10 years off like I did.

Also, try not to over think it when on ice- practice good form off ice and hopefully it'll just become muscle memory, I find if I think about a shot too much I tend to miss more often than if I just react.

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04-08-2011, 03:47 PM
  #42
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Chances are bending your knees will help a lot more. Like doug5984 mentioned, try not to think about it. I was struggling with slapshots for a while then I just stopped thinking about it and now its easy (same goes for my golf swing too).

Shooting with your skates facing towards the net is not gonna produce as much power as having them perpendicular to the net. Generally when you shoot with your skates facing the net its because your moving. Those types of shots are all about a quick and accurate release. Stationary wristers should be perpendicular to the net. That was you can bring the puck behind your back (further from the goal) skate and really get some flex on it. You also get more power from your core taking these shots.

Also practice practice practice. Hope that helps

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04-08-2011, 03:58 PM
  #43
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If you're standing still facing your target and taking a wrist shot, you're going to get VERY little power on it. It will be all in the wrist snap and forearm strength, and those aren't big muscles.

When you're skating and take the same shot, you at least get forward momentum, and can put that into your stick for additional power. Or if you were perpendicular to your target, you could at least push off your back leg and put that force into the stick for some power.

They're all good skills to have, but just keep in mind, the more force you can put into the stick and puck, the harder the shot will be. Facing the target standing still there's almost no power generated below the waist. And the largest muscles generate the most force.

EDIT: actually I will say I was screwing around last night at practice and doing exactly what you were describing, facing the net on ice in skates and shooting wristers. But all I was doing was trying to bar down over and over. I basically cupped the puck a bit and leaned on to the stick and then snapped the wrists to pop the puck up. More power than just flicking the puck, but still no weight transfer or forward momentum. And I did go 7/10 bar down

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04-08-2011, 05:15 PM
  #44
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One thing that I don't think gets talked about enough is that when you're skating forward, learn to shoot off your "wrong" foot. That means if you're a righty, keep your right foot planted, and if you're lefty, keep your left foot planted.

This may seem like it's the opposite of what you'd normally do. I mean if you tried a slapshot like this, it wouldn't work. However, it's definitely a great way to get a quick and hard shot off while you're moving.

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04-10-2011, 01:05 AM
  #45
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Originally Posted by DubiSnacks17 View Post
One thing that I don't think gets talked about enough is that when you're skating forward, learn to shoot off your "wrong" foot. That means if you're a righty, keep your right foot planted, and if you're lefty, keep your left foot planted.

This may seem like it's the opposite of what you'd normally do. I mean if you tried a slapshot like this, it wouldn't work. However, it's definitely a great way to get a quick and hard shot off while you're moving.
That's actually the only real way to take a snapper in motion and can work for a wrister, depending on where the puck is relative to your body. Make sure you follow through and snap both wrists with conviction, it'll help a lot.

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03-22-2012, 02:42 PM
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just wanted to add my own question to this thread instead of starting a new one.

I am starting with roller hockey, and while im not sure how different it is in regards to shooting i just wanted to caveat my questions.

Im trying to watch vids/get tips, advice wherever i can but i also know trial and error will eventually bring me my technique.

1. is it a good idea to only practice your shot in skates? i did one off skates shot practice and i noticed how much easier it was to do the weight transfer. the shoe grips the ground and you can really put some force into it with little practice. so i decided to refrain from practicing my shots without skates on for this reason. yesterday i was rolling around for about 2 hours and just wristing it wherever the puck landed (adding in stickhandling etc). I noticed the weight transfer worked differently on my skates. While this may not be true for everyone, I found it easier to actually kick my leg back (right handed shooter, so kicking my right leg back) and it naturally forced my upper body forward into the shot. everytime i tried to focus on shifting my weight forward everything would just go wrong. To sum up, is it better to practice on skates only or to add in off skate shooting practice?

2. I dont have a goal to shoot at, and the roller hockey rink i go to has the goalie creases painted in but nothing else. so whenever i would shoot at the crease my shot was garbage. but on the otherside of the rink someone had spray painted a goal outline. whenever i skated toward that, i was getting lift and power. is it just a mental thing?

3. my shots usually have lift now, yay! but some of them look really pretty and accurate IE: puck spinning in a circle, but some are floppy and just flip, which obviously will decrease speed through the air. how do i work on preventing this consistently?

Sorry for the long post and thanks in advance for any answers!

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03-22-2012, 02:59 PM
  #47
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1. They don't translate perfectly, but I do find shooting in shoes does seem to help with shooting on ice.

For me when I stopped trying to focus on weight transfer, the shot improved. It's not so much upper or lower body but forward motion/momentum. Think of a drive off the back foot forward.

2. Maybe. Visualization is powerful.

3. Check earlier in the thread for my description of spin re: lifting the puck. You want the heel-to-toe movement of the puck, at least while learning.

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03-22-2012, 03:14 PM
  #48
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Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
1. They don't translate perfectly, but I do find shooting in shoes does seem to help with shooting on ice.

For me when I stopped trying to focus on weight transfer, the shot improved. It's not so much upper or lower body but forward motion/momentum. Think of a drive off the back foot forward.

2. Maybe. Visualization is powerful.

3. Check earlier in the thread for my description of spin re: lifting the puck. You want the heel-to-toe movement of the puck, at least while learning.
thanks for the quick response!

I know there is a lot of emphasis on stick flex/weight shift. is it noticeable to you when you are taking a shot? I get down on the puck push it forward and whip it and sometimes its a beauty and i dont really remember feeling my body shift forward a LOT or the my stick was bending.

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03-22-2012, 11:30 PM
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So, it has actually taken a complete 360 turn as far as off ice and on ice goes. So off ice (my backyard) I can take wrist shots and lift them with ease (not sure what I have done differently but I am getting used to the motion). I tried yesterday at pick-up to lift my shots and I can get them once in a while, but I think I may be holding the stick differently or something on ice as I am a bit 'higher' with the skates on. Not to sure, either way I am having some issues transferring off ice skills to the ice. It may be the height of the skates, or positioning. Also when off ice I can stand facing my target both feet looking like ( | | ) but on ice I cant seem to shoot 'facing my target' if I want the puck to lift I have to stand perpendicular towards the net. Make sense at all?

Maybe it is my balance on the skates on ice not to sure but I am definitely still trying to practice more and more.
Maybe you're getting more stick flex off-ice since the puck is dragging a bit on the higher friction surface. Try dragging your stick blade a little harder on the ice as you're sweeping the puck to get a bit more flex in your stick during the wrist shot.
What's your weight and height, just to see how it correlates to your stick flex?

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03-23-2012, 09:50 AM
  #50
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Originally Posted by do0glas View Post
thanks for the quick response!

I know there is a lot of emphasis on stick flex/weight shift. is it noticeable to you when you are taking a shot? I get down on the puck push it forward and whip it and sometimes its a beauty and i dont really remember feeling my body shift forward a LOT or the my stick was bending.
It depends on how whippy you like the stick.

I had three sticks this past year, all intermediates, one 60 flex, one 70, one 75 (though it felt stiffer).

With the 75, I barely felt it flex. The 70 was hit or miss like you describe. The 60 felt like it was whipping a ton with every shot.

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