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noob question about defense

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Old
05-11-2011, 06:34 AM
  #1
genghiz9000
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noob question about defense

so if you're playing defense and their winger has puck and is against the boards, with their back turned to you...what do you do? whats your strategy? which way do you try to force them? how do you do it? etc


also, if you guys know any blogs/websites with comprehensive defense tips please post

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05-11-2011, 08:49 AM
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jorbjorb
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hold him against the boards. not the whole time or you'll get holding. just constantly pressure into the boards. push, dig, push, dig. etc

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05-11-2011, 10:12 AM
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tarheelhockey
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Always have your head on a swivel so you know if you have support from a teammate.

If you do, and really you should in this scenario, pin him to the boards and try to work the puck out to a teammate with your skates and stick. Your teammates should be concerned with covering your back. Once the puck is out, get back in position.

If for some reason you're "on an island" without support, and there is a second opposing player in the area, play it more conservatively. Stay between the puck and the net. Chances are if you close in he will try and pass the puck to his open teammate for an easy 1-on-0, so you want to cut off that option until your teammates arrive. Again, have your head on a swivel and don't get sucked in without support.

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05-13-2011, 05:47 AM
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FootKnight
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Hit him as hard as you can in the upper back, the higher the better, to drive his head into the glass. That's what watching the NHL recently has taught me.


Just to be clear, this is a joke.

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05-13-2011, 06:36 AM
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1manband
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FootKnight View Post
Hit him as hard as you can in the upper back, the higher the better, to drive his head into the glass. That's what watching the NHL recently has taught me.


Just to be clear, this is a joke.

Your post or the NHL????????


tarheelhockey is pretty much dead on in this situation, work on your boardplay and always be thinking about the guys route to the net should you loose the battle, make it hard for him to get there

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05-14-2011, 02:12 PM
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nystromshairstylist
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A play I bring over from 25 years of hoops; look at the player going towards the ball - has he been favoring his right hand or left. In hockey you can tell right away since you can see if the person is a rightside or leftside shot.

Most people when they rush into the boards to chase a loose puck will come off the boards facing their favored side, meaning if a player goes to the boards and is a rightside shot he will likely move left so as to avoid having to handle the puck on their backhand when coming off the board. So i will go to the left of a rightside shooter so that I can cut them off and possibly grab the puck off his stick or knock it away from them. Reverse this for a leftside shot.

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05-15-2011, 01:10 AM
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My primary concern in that situation is to make sure the player does not get inside position on me. I don't care if his movement takes him towards the point, my main goal is to make sure he can't spin around and drive towards my net.

That doesn't mean overplay one side but you have to make damned sure he doesn't beat you to the net side. Notice how NHL defensemen always err on letting the forward get the pass out to their points but they almost never give up inside position to the goal. If he shields you off and passes to the point- so be it, but do not let him shield you off and drive to the net.


The other thing to be mindful of is avoiding penalties, so if you get your stick in there keep it away from his feet, because a quick movement left or right by a player with your stick near their feet is going to cause a penalty.

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05-17-2011, 01:42 PM
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if you've studied/played your opponents before, or you watch from the bench, you know their skill level. For opponents with a higher skill level than me, I play "contain" and make sure they stay on the perimeter. Pancake had an excellent point...let them walk towards the point, but don't let them beat you down low.

If you're confident that you're the better player, I typically go for a pin and try to dig the puck out. Typically, a forward will come down to support on the boards if I manage to get the puck out towards them.

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05-17-2011, 02:47 PM
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Depends on the type of game/league you are playing in. I play in a non-contact league, so it's next to impossible to play a physical game. If you can't pin the player, make sure you stay between the player and the net at the very least. Try to poke the puck off their stick with a stick check if possible.

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05-17-2011, 06:17 PM
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Marotte Marauder
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Put your knee between his legs to pin him to the wall. Which leg? The leg farthest from the goal line, so if can spin away it's toward the point.

Not using your hands should eliminate a penalty and allow you to dig for the puck.

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05-19-2011, 11:28 AM
  #11
JLHockeyKnight
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Just for clarity, let's say we're looking at a goal "upward." So say you're the left D, and the RWer is coming in. You pressure them onto the boards. Likely their center will come help out, so your defending center, generally covering the slot, goes and battles with their center. The offensive LWer will likely come toward the slot, so the defense's RD will cover him. Or the offensive LWer may go behind the net, so the defending RD needs to stay in front of the net and be ready. The defending LWer needs to cover the offensive RD, as he'll likely be behind the pile and waiting for a puck to squirt back along the boards.

If you're playing D, I would generally try to force the puck out to the blue line. Your defending LWer should be there ready for it. Others may disagree though.

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05-23-2011, 12:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marotte Marauder View Post
Put your knee between his legs to pin him to the wall. Which leg? The leg farthest from the goal line, so if can spin away it's toward the point.

Not using your hands should eliminate a penalty and allow you to dig for the puck.
Pretty much this, except make sure you use your hips rather than knee to pin him to the wall. Keep a wide stance and tie his stick up.

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05-24-2011, 03:00 PM
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Hooah4
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one of the most underrated things is talking! talk to your goalie, your forwards, your D partner, etc. during play...alot of times people will listen and it gets them to pick their heads up.

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05-24-2011, 06:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JLHockeyKnight View Post
If you're playing D, I would generally try to force the puck out to the blue line. Your defending LWer should be there ready for it. Others may disagree though.
Nope! I agree with that. Why have the puck move towards the point? Simple, if the puck moves towards the point, the goalie has a clear view of all of the players out front. However, if the puck moves more towards the goal line, then the goalie starts to get more pressure or concern about who's out front and who's not.

Then the goalie will have to be taking "Pictures" all the time and that sucks for him. But once the puck moves out towards the point, the pressure is relieved. So the key in offensive attacking is to keep maximum pressure on the goalie and the best place for that is behind the goal line and or behind the net.

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05-25-2011, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Nope! I agree with that. Why have the puck move towards the point? Simple, if the puck moves towards the point, the goalie has a clear view of all of the players out front. However, if the puck moves more towards the goal line, then the goalie starts to get more pressure or concern about who's out front and who's not.

Then the goalie will have to be taking "Pictures" all the time and that sucks for him. But once the puck moves out towards the point, the pressure is relieved. So the key in offensive attacking is to keep maximum pressure on the goalie and the best place for that is behind the goal line and or behind the net.

Head coach
I wish more people would work like that. I have a tendency to go to the corner or behind the net to be open for a pass and I rarely see passes. It's a great spot to throw a goalie off...that's one reason why Gretzky was Gretzky.

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05-25-2011, 03:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JLHockeyKnight View Post
I wish more people would work like that. I have a tendency to go to the corner or behind the net to be open for a pass and I rarely see passes. It's a great spot to throw a goalie off...that's one reason why Gretzky was Gretzky.
Well, that's the cool thing about coaching. Every coach has his own way on how he thinks the game should be played and how he would like to guide the team. So, on that note, I have my defensemen, while at the points in the attacking zone, push the puck back into the corner and behind the net, instead of shooting on goal. Why?

When the puck is out at the point, that is considered the strong side...right? Ok, 9 times out of 10, there will be bodies in front as the shot goes towards the goalie...right? About 75% of those shots get deflected and never reach the net. So, if you have a great wingers that know how to redirect the puck on net, you have a better chance at scoring because of the redirect...right? Well, the majority of players don't know how to redirect.

So, to increase the odds of scoring, I have them throw the puck back to a player that is set up behind. If that defensemen at the point takes that big slap shot at the point, there is a really good chance that the pick will hit the shin pad of the forward covering that zone and it goes into the neutral zone for a break away. So to keep that from happening, I have them dump it into the corner and around behind the net.

Ok, here's a question.....

If the puck is out at the point, how many player will there be behind the goalie line? (jeopardy music here) ANSWER: None!

So, if you have the off winger move away from the defensemen, and then set up behind the net, the puck will definately get to him. Then, if he/she if cool, calm and collective, they will see the man out front and make the pass....80% of the time, the shot goes in. Why?

Because now you have closed the reaction gap time between the shooter and the goalie and the majority of the time, the goalie can not react fast enough.

Now, you defensemen, don't freak out about having to dump in the corner all the time. In fact, when we have the man advantage, I want my defensemen out at the points to have a shooting field day and send the puck to the net as much as possible. However...DO NOT MISS THE ^(&$#@! NET!!!!!!!!!!

How can you get the opportunity to make that reaction gap time work for you if you don't hit the net.

Head Coach

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05-27-2011, 03:25 PM
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Take one hand off your stick (I shoot left so left hand comes off) and poke check with your right hand from the right side and use the now free left hand to guide the player into the boards, with support from your left leg.

The intention is to disrupt the play entirely with the pokecheck but if the player cannot be contained, do not let him advance deeper. Guide him away and prepare to continue the battle!

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05-27-2011, 03:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Headcoach View Post
Well, that's the cool thing about coaching. Every coach has his own way on how he thinks the game should be played and how he would like to guide the team. So, on that note, I have my defensemen, while at the points in the attacking zone, push the puck back into the corner and behind the net, instead of shooting on goal. Why?

When the puck is out at the point, that is considered the strong side...right? Ok, 9 times out of 10, there will be bodies in front as the shot goes towards the goalie...right? About 75% of those shots get deflected and never reach the net. So, if you have a great wingers that know how to redirect the puck on net, you have a better chance at scoring because of the redirect...right? Well, the majority of players don't know how to redirect.

So, to increase the odds of scoring, I have them throw the puck back to a player that is set up behind. If that defensemen at the point takes that big slap shot at the point, there is a really good chance that the pick will hit the shin pad of the forward covering that zone and it goes into the neutral zone for a break away. So to keep that from happening, I have them dump it into the corner and around behind the net.

Ok, here's a question.....

If the puck is out at the point, how many player will there be behind the goalie line? (jeopardy music here) ANSWER: None!

So, if you have the off winger move away from the defensemen, and then set up behind the net, the puck will definately get to him. Then, if he/she if cool, calm and collective, they will see the man out front and make the pass....80% of the time, the shot goes in. Why?

Because now you have closed the reaction gap time between the shooter and the goalie and the majority of the time, the goalie can not react fast enough.

Now, you defensemen, don't freak out about having to dump in the corner all the time. In fact, when we have the man advantage, I want my defensemen out at the points to have a shooting field day and send the puck to the net as much as possible. However...DO NOT MISS THE ^(&$#@! NET!!!!!!!!!!

How can you get the opportunity to make that reaction gap time work for you if you don't hit the net.

Head Coach
Also want to add this as a comment for defensemen who do have decent shots: If you're playing the point and you have a clean look for a shot, provided you're not in the middle of the ice always shoot for the near side. As a pointman you're rarely looking to beat the goalie clean, either looking to rely on traffic or get a deflection/rebound.

If you miss the net near side, the puck stays in the zone and your forwards can go get it. If you miss the net far side (weak side), the puck caroms off the boards or glass and likely leaves the offensive zone. So...always shoot near side unless you're in the middle of the ice.

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05-31-2011, 03:27 PM
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JLHockeyKnight
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Originally Posted by hockeyman001 View Post
Also want to add this as a comment for defensemen who do have decent shots: If you're playing the point and you have a clean look for a shot, provided you're not in the middle of the ice always shoot for the near side. As a pointman you're rarely looking to beat the goalie clean, either looking to rely on traffic or get a deflection/rebound.

If you miss the net near side, the puck stays in the zone and your forwards can go get it. If you miss the net far side (weak side), the puck caroms off the boards or glass and likely leaves the offensive zone. So...always shoot near side unless you're in the middle of the ice.
Agreed. Low shots as well. High shots always seem to fly over the net and do the same as you mentioned, go flying off the glass and out of the zone. Low shots hit the goalies pads and give a good chance to make a play in front.

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05-31-2011, 04:40 PM
  #20
Pog Form
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Originally Posted by JLHockeyKnight View Post
Agreed. Low shots as well. High shots always seem to fly over the net and do the same as you mentioned, go flying off the glass and out of the zone. Low shots hit the goalies pads and give a good chance to make a play in front.
Point shots are always terrible where I play. If you can't keep the puck down, don't shoot through traffic.

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05-31-2011, 05:39 PM
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Trojan35
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Point shots are always terrible where I play. If you can't keep the puck down, don't shoot through traffic.
Shooting low: You have to get a puck by 4+ 3mm-wide skate blades and a goalie who is probably standing tall trying to look over a screen.

Shooting high: You have to get a puck through 400+lbs of beef, a glove, blocker, and a +10 oversized chest protector..... and when you hit your teammate in the throat cuz you can't aim he's going to never screen for you again.

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06-01-2011, 09:07 AM
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JLHockeyKnight
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Shooting low: You have to get a puck by 4+ 3mm-wide skate blades and a goalie who is probably standing tall trying to look over a screen.

Shooting high: You have to get a puck through 400+lbs of beef, a glove, blocker, and a +10 oversized chest protector..... and when you hit your teammate in the throat cuz you can't aim he's going to never screen for you again.
Also a point I should have mentioned. The best way to have a good season is to have your team go home healthy after every game.

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06-01-2011, 09:20 AM
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schmidtlesauce
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i'll be the first to admit that in my roller league when i first started i used to send bombs from the point that went every which way. hit a couple people, but luckily they were defenders so when i would wind up they didnt want to get in the way of it. my teammates already knew i had a tendency to go rogue so they bailed too. since then i have learned to keep it on the ice, but my "early career" still had people guessing. lol

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