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Am I supposed to feel a burn while shooting pucks?

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05-25-2011, 07:33 PM
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Iplayhockehh
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Am I supposed to feel a burn while shooting pucks?

Hey guys.

Am I supposed to feel a burn in my wrists while shooting pucks? Because I certainly do not. I shot 800 pucks per day for the past week and I never felt a burn. Today, I tried taping two pucks to my stick where the blade meets the shaft and then proceeded to shoot 300 pucks. I felt a slight burn in my wrists but it seemed to burn less and less as I kept shooting. At the end of today's shooting session I felt as if my release was quicker but that could just be my eyes playing tricks on me as I doubt shooting pucks with a weighted stick could help THAT much in a day. So my question is, does anyone feel a burn while shooting pucks?

Thanks.

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05-25-2011, 08:22 PM
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Pez68
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Originally Posted by Iplayhockehh View Post
Hey guys.

Am I supposed to feel a burn in my wrists while shooting pucks? Because I certainly do not. I shot 800 pucks per day for the past week and I never felt a burn. Today, I tried taping two pucks to my stick where the blade meets the shaft and then proceeded to shoot 300 pucks. I felt a slight burn in my wrists but it seemed to burn less and less as I kept shooting. At the end of today's shooting session I felt as if my release was quicker but that could just be my eyes playing tricks on me as I doubt shooting pucks with a weighted stick could help THAT much in a day. So my question is, does anyone feel a burn while shooting pucks?

Thanks.
If you're shooting properly, and shooting that many pucks, you should feel it in several places, not just your wrists. A proper shot torques many different muscles. Forearms, biceps, shoulders, abdomen, back muscles, etc. Hell, you should even feel it in your legs. A properly executed wrist shot uses pretty much your entire body for power/torque. You really shouldn't feel much of anything in your wrists, since all you're doing is flexing that joint on the shot. I've certainly never felt a "burn" in my wrists when shooting a ton of pucks.

How hard are you shooting? 800 pucks is a ridiculous number of shots to be taking, unless it's spread out over several sessions.

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05-25-2011, 08:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Pez68 View Post
If you're shooting properly, and shooting that many pucks, you should feel it in several places, not just your wrists. A proper shot torques many different muscles. Forearms, biceps, shoulders, abdomen, back muscles, etc. Hell, you should even feel it in your legs. A properly executed wrist shot uses pretty much your entire body for power/torque. You really shouldn't feel much of anything in your wrists, since all you're doing is flexing that joint on the shot. I've certainly never felt a "burn" in my wrists when shooting a ton of pucks.

How hard are you shooting? 800 pucks is a ridiculous number of shots to be taking, unless it's spread out over several sessions.
Well, I shot about 500 and came out later and shot 300 more. This is my technique:
1. pull back
2. drag puck with both hands
3. push out and also open blade
4. snap wrist over at the target.

Obviously you know what to do so I hope you dont mind me asking a few questions.
First one, am I supposed to be flexing any of my muscles on purpose while shooting?
Second, am I supposed to snap as hard as I can when I snap over? I dont think I do either of those.

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05-25-2011, 08:40 PM
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Push down in to the shaft, the whipping through is how you'll generate power.

This is a pretty good video on it

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05-25-2011, 08:41 PM
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Pez68
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Originally Posted by Iplayhockehh View Post
Well, I shot about 500 and came out later and shot 300 more. This is my technique:
1. pull back
2. drag puck with both hands
3. push out and also open blade
4. snap wrist over at the target.

Obviously you know what to do so I hope you dont mind me asking a few questions.
First one, am I supposed to be flexing any of my muscles on purpose while shooting?
Second, am I supposed to snap as hard as I can when I snap over? I dont think I do either of those.
If you're shooting a good, hard wrist shot, you should end up standing on one leg as the puck is released. If you shoot right, you should end up on your left leg. If you shoot left, end up on your right leg. I have a feeling you're just not torquing enough when you shoot, or you'd be dead tired after just 100 shots. Your entire bottom arm should be flexing when you torque down to load the wrist shot. After taking 40-50 straight wrist shots like that, your bottom arm should be almost ready to fall off. If you're really trying to shoot as hard and accurate as possible, anyways.

This page has a pretty good clip of how you should look when taking a proper wrist shot:

http://www.hockeyshot.com/articles.asp?id=153

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05-25-2011, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Pez68 View Post
If you're shooting a good, hard wrist shot, you should end up standing on one leg as the puck is released. If you shoot right, you should end up on your left leg. If you shoot left, end up on your right leg. I have a feeling you're just not torquing enough when you shoot, or you'd be dead tired after just 100 shots. Your entire bottom arm should be flexing when you torque down to load the wrist shot. After taking 40-50 straight wrist shots like that, your bottom arm should be almost ready to fall off. If you're really trying to shoot as hard and accurate as possible, anyways.

This page has a pretty good clip of how you should look when taking a proper wrist shot:

http://www.hockeyshot.com/articles.asp?id=153
I always end up landing on my left leg(right handed) my technique is very good, my shots do not flutter what so ever and I can put it where I want. However, this "loading the stick" does that mean I should push down at the beginning of my wrist shot as hard as possible and then drag it towards the net and then push out and snap over?

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05-25-2011, 08:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Iplayhockehh View Post
I always end up landing on my left leg(right handed) my technique is very good, my shots do not flutter what so ever and I can put it where I want. However, this "loading the stick" does that mean I should push down at the beginning of my wrist shot as hard as possible and then drag it towards the net and then push out and snap over?
Correct. That's how most of the power is generated. Once you can get it nailed down, you should be able to snap off lasers without sweeping your stick back at all. Just torquing down on the stick and then releasing that torque on the puck, much like that Kovalev video that was posted.

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05-25-2011, 09:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Pez68 View Post
Correct. That's how most of the power is generated. Once you can get it nailed down, you should be able to snap off lasers without sweeping your stick back at all. Just torquing down on the stick and then releasing that torque on the puck, much like that Kovalev video that was posted.
Thanks a lot Pez. The help is appreciated

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05-26-2011, 05:26 AM
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It sounds like you're fine. If you're having wrist pain, it's probably a good thing as long as it doesn't last really long. BTW, most of the power on the wrist shot is from snapping the wrists aggressively and in unison with the body, not so much loading the stick, but it's ideal to do both.

Having strong forearms helps a lot, but timing and follow through (full weight transfer) are really key.


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05-26-2011, 09:35 AM
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i'm wondering why nobody suppused the obvious...why u talk only about his technique?

i mean he said he shoots 800!!!! shots per day.

maybe its just too much for his wrist and few days break would help?

just because he certainly doesnt have pain by shooting this amount of pucks doesnt mean its good for him.

could be a tenosynovitis or some overload because of the daily stress

sry for my english

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05-26-2011, 10:34 AM
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I figured he was exaggerating a bit

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05-26-2011, 06:18 PM
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Originally Posted by donGjohnson View Post
I figured he was exaggerating a bit
Im 100% sure im not exaggerating. Especially when im shooting pucks for 4 hours a day. Im really determined to improve.

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05-26-2011, 08:24 PM
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Okay so today I got out and shot 340 pucks, and I definitely felt more tired than before, however I did not feel tired after 100 shots and my arm did not feel as if it was about to fall off. I was thinking about why this is as im pretty sure my technique is almost spot on, and I came to the conclusion that I might be too powerful for the flex on my stick as I can flex it with a lot of ease. If I were to pick up a stiffer stick do you think I would get a better workout?

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05-26-2011, 10:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Iplayhockehh View Post
Im 100% sure im not exaggerating. Especially when im shooting pucks for 4 hours a day. Im really determined to improve.
800 is too much. Overdoing it will hurt you physically, roll it back to 300-400 and try to focus more on exaggerating proper technique each time.

If you need to work on slap shots, DO NOT EXCEED 200-250 PER DAY with a full weight puck. If you're doing it with full intensity, going above that every day will cause you shoulder injuries.


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05-26-2011, 11:57 PM
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Iplayhockehh
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Originally Posted by donGjohnson View Post
800 is too much. Overdoing it will hurt you physically, roll it back to 300-400 and try to focus more on exaggerating proper technique each time.

If you need to work on slap shots, DO NOT EXCEED 200-250 PER DAY with a full weight puck. If you're doing it with full intensity, going above that every day will cause you shoulder injuries.
But I heard ryan johansen shot pucks all day during the summer according to his dad. And he went from the third line on his bchl team to a first line whler in one summer.

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05-27-2011, 12:27 AM
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No two people are the same, your body will tell you if you're shooting too much, just as it will tell you if you're overworking with pretty much any type of exercise. If you start to feel significant pain in your shoulder, wrists, tendons in your hands (whatever they're called), etc., then back off a bit, but if you can shoot a tonne with only the normal low level stiffness/aches then I'd say keep it up.

As for your stick flexing too much, that's really a personal preference thing, some like a tonne of whip, others like very stiff sticks. If you think it feels to soft for you, it probably is. What's your height/weight, what's the flex rating on your current stick, and how much have you cut it down?

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05-27-2011, 12:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Iplayhockehh View Post
But I heard ryan johansen shot pucks all day during the summer according to his dad. And he went from the third line on his bchl team to a first line whler in one summer.
You don't jump up two lines just because you improved your shot. You'd do better spending half your time skating, 30% stick handling and 20% shooting.

You've gotta remember that you'll spend far more time skating and stick handling than you will shooting. You've also gotta remember that if you eff up your shoulders or wrists, they can take a really long time to heal. You'll gain more power by doing targeted work outs than by shooting anyway. If you need info on adding 10 mph to your slap shots, pm me. I can help with velocity, but don't ask me about accuracy

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05-28-2011, 01:28 AM
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Originally Posted by ponder View Post
No two people are the same, your body will tell you if you're shooting too much, just as it will tell you if you're overworking with pretty much any type of exercise. If you start to feel significant pain in your shoulder, wrists, tendons in your hands (whatever they're called), etc., then back off a bit, but if you can shoot a tonne with only the normal low level stiffness/aches then I'd say keep it up.

As for your stick flexing too much, that's really a personal preference thing, some like a tonne of whip, others like very stiff sticks. If you think it feels to soft for you, it probably is. What's your height/weight, what's the flex rating on your current stick, and how much have you cut it down?
I'm using a 50 flex bauer vapor xxxx that I bought way back in september(extremely durable). I am 110 pounds at 5"6-5"7. I haven't cut it down at all but it comes up to my chin in feet now thanks to a few growth spurts

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07-22-2011, 11:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Pez68 View Post
If you're shooting a good, hard wrist shot, you should end up standing on one leg as the puck is released. If you shoot right, you should end up on your left leg. If you shoot left, end up on your right leg. I have a feeling you're just not torquing enough when you shoot, or you'd be dead tired after just 100 shots.
Well, I usually shoot from the off-foot and in-stride. I can do it as you describe, but I prefer doing it from the off-foot, even when I don't move. (That's starting and ending on my right leg as a right side shooter.) I just kick my other leg while I do this... it's somewhat synchronized with the shooting arm so that you keep balanced. Everyone learns to shoot sideways first and that's the basic - I did so at first. But it's rare you get the occasion to shoot as you ask. Here, you can see Semin doing a little toe drag and shooting from the off-foot: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3U7a_38K_UQ

The idea is you don't actually need all that much hip rotation to actually generate good speed as Sasha showed here.

I mean, if you look and compare when the guy's sideways or facing the net, it doesn't seem to change much a thing - it's still blazing fast. He can do it NHL pace, I can do it amateur pace... So, no, you don't need to land on the other leg, no more than you need to be sideways.
_______________
As, for your questions, I will tell you it's hard to explain. There's a sense of burning feeling that is almost desirable - that's a muscle tiring effect exactly like when you lift weights or try and run for miles during the same day... it burns, but that's a nice burn.

Usually, you'll feel this where the contraction occurred. So, for wrist shots, you might feel several muscles burning after a while; it could be your abdominal muscles, but not your hips; your quadriceps, but not your knees; your forearm, but not your wrist.

There's always a big movement implied in speeding the puck when you release the flexing tension and that's when you turn your hand over at the end of the movement. That's called a pronation. The pronator is attached at the elbow on the anterior part of your forearm (that's the same side as that of your palm) and if you repeat the wrist shot often, you might feel pain there. I would say it's a very bad idea to do that when you are pained because this precise forearm motion use in the wrist shot (which the tennis serve, overhead and forehand follow-through share with) may lead to a condition called lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow)... that's not funny to have and it's one example of many health issues.

So, the medical advice is to stop your movement when you feel pain in your joints. If you feel burning in your muscles, it means they are working out; if you feel pain in your joints, it means there's something wrong! Best way to prevent all of these problems is to warm up slowly and the best way to warm up is by doing what you will be doing: that is, dynamic movements. Don't do passive stretches before a dynamic activity as it will lessen your tensile strength and power while not necessarily preventing injuries. Hence, to warm up, do little movements with the different parts of your body you will use.


Last edited by Sharpshooter101: 07-23-2011 at 12:00 AM.
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