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Small, but big tips thread

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Old
05-17-2011, 04:13 PM
  #51
Marotte Marauder
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Learn to use your eyes and SEE the play. When you the SEE the play MAKE the play, don't hesitate.

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05-18-2011, 01:09 AM
  #52
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Backhand sauce is your best friend.

The biggest thing is definitely trying to realize you have a lot more time than you think.

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05-18-2011, 08:46 AM
  #53
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Something that has helped me out a lot in the last couple of games- know who you are playing against, and look at them when deciding what to do.

If they look exhausted you'll have a much easier time going around them, if they are fresh and look like they are playing aggressive you might have to dump the puck off.

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05-18-2011, 11:23 AM
  #54
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I'll bring it up again but definitely use the point.

At any given game I'm one of the worst stick handlers on the ice, but I typically hang out around the point and feel very little in the way of pressure. All the D-men bunch up around the crease and the wingers in deep. I'll sit at point with no one in a 15 foot radius, able to bail the winger out if he's having trouble

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05-19-2011, 09:18 AM
  #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ekcut View Post
1) Never chase a player behind the net...you'll never catch him...go in front of the net and meet him at the other post.
I love this one and I couldn't agree more. I tell all my teammates to do this. I am the center on my line and me and my left winger have a set forecheck play that works nearly every time; When their defenseman goes behind the net I wait out front for him to try and skate it out. Once he tries to skate it out I pressure him and he then throws it towards the middle of the ice (if he's not thinking), or he tries to clear it up the boards where my winger is waiting for the puck. This play allows us to keep it in the zone for nearly our entire shift.

One tip from me has to do with moving the puck up the ice. When bringing the puck into the zone most people will start to skate it towards the boards (because there is more space), but you'll find most of your success comes from getting into the slot. So if you have some speed and the defenseman has to turn around to keep up with you, instead of skating towards the boards cut back towards the middle. This will throw a lot of Dmen off and even if he is able to stay with you then you should be able to use him as a screen.

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07-04-2011, 11:56 PM
  #56
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If you want to win the Stanley Cup then you are better off signing at league minimum for about $700k rather than trying to juice all the money you can get; I.E. take $700k instead of $6 million

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07-05-2011, 01:54 AM
  #57
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Originally Posted by ComradeChris View Post
If you want to win the Stanley Cup then you are better off signing at league minimum for about $700k rather than trying to juice all the money you can get; I.E. take $700k instead of $6 million
One of my favorite tips. I use this one all the time

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07-05-2011, 02:48 AM
  #58
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No matter what skating always needs your attention and hard work!

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07-05-2011, 12:28 PM
  #59
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Originally Posted by umpft View Post
Do you have any suggestions about how to improve my positioning? It's the first season I play and i don't have much experience. I'm a RW and sometimes I wonder where the heck I should be to get a pass... I don't get many of them.

On a side note, my cardio is not too bad and I can skate quite fast, (nothing really noteworthy, just a bit above the average here) so often I find myself going after almost every single puck in the offensive zone, no matter who has lost it, even when the chances of a poke check are low - after all I'm new and they're good at defending it. That necessarily brings me out of position. Should I do that or not?

Hope it makes sense
This is a beginner type thread but unfortunately that question is actually complex. With regards to positioning, the best players are the ones who know how to rotate positions.


I generally play center but I absolutely hate playing with players who think that position = staying in your designated area of the ice. When "said" player is checked or covered, there's no movement because he's "supposedly staying in position" which pretty much makes him/her useless on the entire play, even if by chance the puck goes to him (since he's already checked/covered).



As a center, creativity in play is easier when everyone is rotating positions to create space and opportunity and as far as defense is concerned, it gives the more of a challenge of tracking more players & continuously changing opening positions. (As opposed to a static forward who just plays his area which pretty much means, the defense doesn't have to move much to cover/check you)



Of course, at the end of the day, it's a team game and rotating positions require that teamwork to cover areas left by others.

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07-05-2011, 12:48 PM
  #60
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nice tips in this thread.


The one biggest thing for me when I was a younger player was that I wanted to go top shelf every shot and alot of times I didnt have my head up. So my tip is to look at where you are shooting. If you dont have your head up...it hits the goalie in the chest...look at what you have to shoot at and more likely than not the 5 hole and low to the stick will get you goals...tho they may not be top shelf over the glove like you see in highlights.

Another huge thing to me at least is to know that you are playing against people and not a machine. Sounds silly but hear me out. You in a way have to sell or act your way into faking out a goalie and esp defenders when your going one on one. The biggest move that comes to mind for me as a defenseman is selling a left turn and then a very tight 180 turn back to the right side. This buys you a few more seconds to either skate up the ice or make a pass to an open guy.

Lastly...skate to the puck. On passes from teamates in particular. Often I watch mens league games and I can see guys not skating to the puck...a defender comes in picks it off and a sweet chance for the other team just happened while you and your line of forwards are too late to get back or even sometimes still streaking up for a breakout pass.

Someone else said it...never stop working on skating and shooting the puck. Even if you goto stick n puck once a week by yourself...its helping more than you know. Work on your edges and perfecting that wrist and slap shot.

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Old
07-09-2011, 02:24 PM
  #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ribosome View Post
You probably have more time than you think you do.
Couldn't agree more. Spent 6-7 years as a goalie and this is only my 3rd as a forward. I get the puck and it feels like I have to get rid of it immediately. Probably because my head is down too much of the time.

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Old
07-10-2011, 09:32 PM
  #62
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One of the best tips in this thread is "you have more time than you think."

This applies to me often when I'm on the point in the offensive zone. If I have the puck and a forward starts skating towards me, I'll pull my stick back, and just wait an extra second, 75 % of the time he'll turn away and I'll have space to either skate in or take a nice shot. The other 25 % just dump it back in.

If a forward is skating at you (While you're on the point) don't shoot at the net unless you're sure it will get their, the worst thing you can do as a D is shoot at their shin pads, and give them a break away.

Wait it out, dump it back in, pass to the other d, pass to the winger on the half boards.

And if you have the space, throw it at the net! Doesn't have to be slap shot.

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Old
07-10-2011, 10:06 PM
  #63
Mike Farkas
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As it was referenced, I just want to reiterate it. Puck movement is key as well. The teams that I coach, I always preach about quick, smart puck movement especially if you're on a lower skilled team. If you wait until a guy is in your kitchen, you have a better chance of burning the dinner.

I think the thought process is, "the longer I wait, the closer this guy will get to me and the less chance he has checking my target" but in actuality you really jeopardize the pass you're making all together. Generally speaking, I'm a fan of "if the pass is there, move it" and then get into open space and you'll get it back. Passing opens up holes in defenses, holding the puck leads to be trapped or gaining "useless ice" which again leads to being trapped.

I tell my less experienced defensemen sometimes to watch their stick positioning while back skating. If you leave your stick hanging way out there like a fishing pole, you allow the attacking forward to understand the extent of your abilities. He can keep the puck just out of your reach (which cause many new d-men to lunge for it, which means you're toast all together). Or even worse, he can put it between you and your stick which is very difficult for a newbie to defend against (more so in a non-contact league).

I tell them to pull the hand on the butt-end back a bit, raise the elbow a bit and keep your stick a bit more in front of your skates as opposed to dangling way out there. The attacker will feel he has more room, get closer to you and then you just simply poke it away without him even realizing you were positioned to do so.

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Old
07-11-2011, 04:42 PM
  #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Farkas View Post
I tell them to pull the hand on the butt-end back a bit, raise the elbow a bit and keep your stick a bit more in front of your skates as opposed to dangling way out there. The attacker will feel he has more room, get closer to you and then you just simply poke it away without him even realizing you were positioned to do so.
This makes so much sense, and even though I rarely play D when I did I would do exactly as you described and leave me stick out there- I need to work on that exactly like you described.


Another piece of advice from me (a newb)- play good positioning- if you chase the puck around not only will you be out of position and give up chances but you'll get tired a lot quicker. I still catch myself doing this a few times a game and I have to hustle to get back where I need to be and focus on not leaving my man.

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Old
07-11-2011, 05:56 PM
  #65
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Communication on the ice is the key, especially if you're playing as center, and also as a D-man (center should be the 3rd D-man...) Makes everything easier for you and your teammates.

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Old
07-11-2011, 06:48 PM
  #66
Nothing As It Seems
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One thing that's become more and more evident to me over the years is that, if you're a serious hockey player who skates 3+ times a week and is looking to really, consistently get better... take a break.

Sounds odd? For most of my life, I played 3+ times a week, year round, each year. The odd moments where, for some reason I was off the ice for an extended period of time - and I mean 1-3 months, not a couple of weeks - I always saw a big improvement in my overall game and the maturity/thought level at which I was playing.

Sure, when you stay off the ice for a couple of months and come back, it takes a couple hours to get your hands up to par again or get your legs back (should be doing conditioning off ice anyways though) but I always find that an aspect of my game is greatly improved by taking some time off. During the time away from hockey, I usually find myself watching lots of games, playing a lot of NHL, watching highlight reels and youtube clips, reading about hockey, and basically thinking about hockey all the time. When I come back to the game, rather than sinking into any old habits I may be in when I'm playing every day, I'm a little more like a blank slate and I can incorporate a new aspect into my game - something that I've noticed from watching and thinking so much hockey but never had the consciousness to adapt when I was playing regularly because I was so intent on playing "my game". Each time I take a break from hockey and come back to it, the game seems a little slower, I seem to see the play better, my vision seems better, my poise seems better and I find that something like my playmaking, or my anticipation, or my positioning on the breakout, or my patience one on one has improved. I think it's all about having time away from the game to let your brain absorb new ideas without being on the ice staying stuck in old routines.

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Old
07-11-2011, 07:09 PM
  #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prustqvist24 View Post
One thing that's become more and more evident to me over the years is that, if you're a serious hockey player who skates 3+ times a week and is looking to really, consistently get better... take a break.

Sounds odd? For most of my life, I played 3+ times a week, year round, each year. The odd moments where, for some reason I was off the ice for an extended period of time - and I mean 1-3 months, not a couple of weeks - I always saw a big improvement in my overall game and the maturity/thought level at which I was playing.

Sure, when you stay off the ice for a couple of months and come back, it takes a couple hours to get your hands up to par again or get your legs back (should be doing conditioning off ice anyways though) but I always find that an aspect of my game is greatly improved by taking some time off. During the time away from hockey, I usually find myself watching lots of games, playing a lot of NHL, watching highlight reels and youtube clips, reading about hockey, and basically thinking about hockey all the time. When I come back to the game, rather than sinking into any old habits I may be in when I'm playing every day, I'm a little more like a blank slate and I can incorporate a new aspect into my game - something that I've noticed from watching and thinking so much hockey but never had the consciousness to adapt when I was playing regularly because I was so intent on playing "my game". Each time I take a break from hockey and come back to it, the game seems a little slower, I seem to see the play better, my vision seems better, my poise seems better and I find that something like my playmaking, or my anticipation, or my positioning on the breakout, or my patience one on one has improved. I think it's all about having time away from the game to let your brain absorb new ideas without being on the ice staying stuck in old routines.
Interesting that you say that. Since I started playing, I've only ever really taken one significant break, which lasted one beer league season (about a few months or so). I never really put much thought into it but I think my biggest improvement actually came during that time. The game just seemed easier, for lack of a better word, when I started up again (and got my hands and legs going after a few skates). WEIRD, MAN.

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Old
07-12-2011, 12:17 AM
  #68
Scorey Perry
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Take more Snap Shots. I feel like too many players coil up long wrist shots that take wayyyy too long to release, and are usually easy for the goalie to read. Look up at an open space in the goal, fire straight down at the ice 2 inches from the puck and follow through to the target. It will be quicker and probably more powerful then your wrister anyway.

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Old
07-12-2011, 01:00 AM
  #69
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Take more Snap Shots. I feel like too many players coil up long wrist shots that take wayyyy too long to release, and are usually easy for the goalie to read. Look up at an open space in the goal, fire straight down at the ice 2 inches from the puck and follow through to the target. It will be quicker and probably more powerful then your wrister anyway.
My snapper is a wrister with no setup. I can fire a snapper without allowing the goalie or defender even an instant to read that it's coming off my stick. It's definitely the best part of my game, offensively. Having a good snap shot is worth 10x a decent wrister.

The only time I ever take a wrist shot, in fact, is when I'm in full stride and the puck is naturally in a position for me to fully sweep into the wrist shot motion. I would never actually "load" a wrister from a scoring position when my snapshot is quicker and more accurate.

The way my snapper comes off my stick though, it's not harder than my wrister. I still get good juice on it, but it doesn't need to have the same velocity when it comes off the stick so much quicker. It is by far the more effective shot. It has basically replace my wrister; it is a wrister, just with no telegraphing, no wind-up, nothing but release.

I definitely agree that people would be more successful to master and utilize the snapper more often.

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Old
07-12-2011, 01:21 AM
  #70
superhakan
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posted this in another thread but.....

Need some advice on how to work on my skating, specifically edge work. I have a rather poor and entirely self taught "technique" and i have a lot of trouble doing crossovers leaning to my right as well as stopping with a turn to the right. Any drills or methods to practice using my outside edges??

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07-12-2011, 01:35 AM
  #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superhakan View Post
posted this in another thread but.....

Need some advice on how to work on my skating, specifically edge work. I have a rather poor and entirely self taught "technique" and i have a lot of trouble doing crossovers leaning to my right as well as stopping with a turn to the right. Any drills or methods to practice using my outside edges??
skate circles. make sure you get a bit of a "bob" going on, each time you are crossing/ and cutting. almost like you are popping off the ice a little bit, then digging right into it with deep knee bends.

I think for a lot of people doing crosscuts clockwise is harder for them to do, but it's something you over come with practice.


Best practice you can do is do figure 8's around the rink's circles. If you can start at the bottom end, do the middle circle, then the top circles. changing rotation on each circle, you should become much more comfortable doing the crosscuts clockwise.

try to keep you hands out, one in front. (your left, and your right behind you -- when doing "clockwise" crosscuts. opposite when your doing them the other way. Obviously this changes when you have a stick in your hand, but if you are practicing skating with a stick in your hand all the time.... you're practicing your skating very wrong. Even with a stick in your hand, doing crosscuts around a circle your arms should be positioned in roughly the same way.

stopping, again practice both ways. do you do t stops or 1 foot hockey stops at all? or just the old 2 foot hockey stop?

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07-12-2011, 01:42 AM
  #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superhakan View Post
posted this in another thread but.....

Need some advice on how to work on my skating, specifically edge work. I have a rather poor and entirely self taught "technique" and i have a lot of trouble doing crossovers leaning to my right as well as stopping with a turn to the right. Any drills or methods to practice using my outside edges??
Getting control of your outside edges is actually easier than inside edges for some people, like me. The reason is that balance on your outside edges relates more to your total body balance, weight has to be completely lined up over your outside edge, while the inside edge does not require such extreme weight transfer/balance.

Practice standing on one foot for a while. Start at 15 seconds and progress gradually. By the time you can do both feet for 60 seconds, your outside edge control will improve.

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07-12-2011, 03:02 AM
  #73
superhakan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Seanconn View Post
skate circles. make sure you get a bit of a "bob" going on, each time you are crossing/ and cutting. almost like you are popping off the ice a little bit, then digging right into it with deep knee bends.

I think for a lot of people doing crosscuts clockwise is harder for them to do, but it's something you over come with practice.


Best practice you can do is do figure 8's around the rink's circles. If you can start at the bottom end, do the middle circle, then the top circles. changing rotation on each circle, you should become much more comfortable doing the crosscuts clockwise.

try to keep you hands out, one in front. (your left, and your right behind you -- when doing "clockwise" crosscuts. opposite when your doing them the other way. Obviously this changes when you have a stick in your hand, but if you are practicing skating with a stick in your hand all the time.... you're practicing your skating very wrong. Even with a stick in your hand, doing crosscuts around a circle your arms should be positioned in roughly the same way.

stopping, again practice both ways. do you do t stops or 1 foot hockey stops at all? or just the old 2 foot hockey stop?
Thanks for he advice, it will be something i work on!

As far as stopping goes its pretty much a T stop.

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07-12-2011, 08:34 AM
  #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by superhakan View Post
posted this in another thread but.....

Need some advice on how to work on my skating, specifically edge work. I have a rather poor and entirely self taught "technique" and i have a lot of trouble doing crossovers leaning to my right as well as stopping with a turn to the right. Any drills or methods to practice using my outside edges??
Remember when skating circles for cross-over to push off with inside leg's (skate) outside edge. If you don't you missing the extra power or speed that comes with that push. I think some just glide on inside skate instead of using it as a stride/push.

Also by keeping your stick on the ice there is a theory that you will catch 80% more passes than you do now.

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07-14-2011, 01:15 PM
  #75
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my tip is, always think positive and believe in yourself. i played some seasons without shooting many goals. but last season i thought to myself "come on, its time to shoot some more goals!" and it works. when i sit on the bench and watch the game, i alwys visualize how i shoot the puck in the net.

i am not the best stickhandler but when i am in a one on one situation i just try new tricks and often it is easier than i thought.

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