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Small, but big tips thread

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Old
07-14-2011, 02:51 PM
  #76
ponder
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Another big one - lateral movement is your friend! Too many people try to beat defenders by skating right at them with no lateral movement, and then trying to toe drag or put the puck between the defenders feet when he's perfectly balanced and in position, needless to say this rarely works unless you have truly magic hands. Start moving side to side early, before you get to the defender, instead of coming straight at him come forward with big strong crossovers, changing directions once or twice before you reach him. You can often get your defender somewhat off balance or out of position just with a bit of lateral movement as you're rushing up the ice, it'll make him much easier to beat.

Same goes for goalies if you're coming in with space/time, by getting yourself moving side to side a bit you can get the goalie off balance/out of position.

Obviously this doesn't apply (with dmen or goalies) when someone is right on your tail hounding you, but if you've got some time and space, look to move side to side a bit with the puck.

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Old
07-14-2011, 04:27 PM
  #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
Another big one - lateral movement is your friend! Too many people try to beat defenders by skating right at them with no lateral movement, and then trying to toe drag or put the puck between the defenders feet when he's perfectly balanced and in position, needless to say this rarely works unless you have truly magic hands. Start moving side to side early, before you get to the defender, instead of coming straight at him come forward with big strong crossovers, changing directions once or twice before you reach him. You can often get your defender somewhat off balance or out of position just with a bit of lateral movement as you're rushing up the ice, it'll make him much easier to beat.

Same goes for goalies if you're coming in with space/time, by getting yourself moving side to side a bit you can get the goalie off balance/out of position.

Obviously this doesn't apply (with dmen or goalies) when someone is right on your tail hounding you, but if you've got some time and space, look to move side to side a bit with the puck.
Another thing to remember is that you can also change speed. Throwing on the brakes is a great way to catch the defender going too far back, opening up lanes for you. Stop and shoot, or throw on the brakes before moving laterally for a lane- it can really open up some space, and it's rare to have a player riding close enough right behind you that you're not going to have any time to do something once you stop or slow down.

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Old
07-14-2011, 04:52 PM
  #78
SERE 24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
Another big one - lateral movement is your friend! Too many people try to beat defenders by skating right at them with no lateral movement, and then trying to toe drag or put the puck between the defenders feet when he's perfectly balanced and in position, needless to say this rarely works unless you have truly magic hands. Start moving side to side early, before you get to the defender, instead of coming straight at him come forward with big strong crossovers, changing directions once or twice before you reach him. You can often get your defender somewhat off balance or out of position just with a bit of lateral movement as you're rushing up the ice, it'll make him much easier to beat.

Same goes for goalies if you're coming in with space/time, by getting yourself moving side to side a bit you can get the goalie off balance/out of position.

Obviously this doesn't apply (with dmen or goalies) when someone is right on your tail hounding you, but if you've got some time and space, look to move side to side a bit with the puck.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cptjeff View Post
Another thing to remember is that you can also change speed. Throwing on the brakes is a great way to catch the defender going too far back, opening up lanes for you. Stop and shoot, or throw on the brakes before moving laterally for a lane- it can really open up some space, and it's rare to have a player riding close enough right behind you that you're not going to have any time to do something once you stop or slow down.
I wouldn't exactly call these "advanced" tips, but they're definitely for the player who can skate well and handle the puck a little and they're both really great pieces of advice. Players who are at the level to use these tips should make immediate note of them if they aren't already employing these ideas.

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Old
07-15-2011, 12:02 PM
  #79
Johnny Law
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Realize that sometimes it just isn't going to go for you and there isn't anything you can do about it.

I've played 20 years of ice and almost the same of Roller, in that time the longest I've gone is two or three games currently I'm up to 6 without a single point.

I'm playing good hockey and taking good shots it just is one of those things, keep shooting and at some point your luck will come around.

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Old
07-17-2011, 12:55 PM
  #80
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A few things I've learned over 2 years of playing ice:

Everyone: Offensively, if you see open ice, take it. Even if you don't have the puck.

Forwards: If you can reach out and touch the other player with the blade of your stick, they're covered.

Defenders: Put an invisible rope between you and your D-Partner. One in the corner, one in front and as one goes to the corner, the other comes to the front.

Defenders: Play the puck up the boards to wingers. Clearing through center is a great way to give up the puck.

Defenders: If you carry the puck deep, make sure a forward has your point. If not, be ready to get right back to it or leave your D-partner out to hang on a 2-1.

Everyone: Never stop moving. If you stop moving, all passes you receive will get picked off.

Defenders: If it looks like your teammate is going to lose the battle, they probably are. Be ready to skate back and have speed so you don't get burned.

Everyone: Stick on the ice. What can you do with your stick off the ice? Take a penalty, that's what.

Goalies: Talk to your defenders. Raise your voice so they can hear you. This isn't the time for your inside voice.

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Old
07-18-2011, 10:00 AM
  #81
Jarick
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Made a slight change to my slapper and backhander yesterday at stick and puck and got a lot more power behind my shots. Dip the leading shoulder before skating into the shot. Seems to get more core rotation or something. Also improved accuracy on slappers, probably making less lateral rotation on the shot.

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Old
07-18-2011, 03:25 PM
  #82
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Most of the time during a game you dont have the puck...try to ask yourself--"If i was the guy with the puck, where would I like an 'option' to be?". Also, when watching a game on the tube think what play you would make prior to the player making the play/pass. You will be surprised how many times your choice is not the players choice, however; there is more than one way to move the puck up the ice!!

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Old
07-18-2011, 03:38 PM
  #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Made a slight change to my slapper and backhander yesterday at stick and puck and got a lot more power behind my shots. Dip the leading shoulder before skating into the shot. Seems to get more core rotation or something. Also improved accuracy on slappers, probably making less lateral rotation on the shot.
By "leading shoulder" do you mean the bottom hand shoulder, or the top hand shoulder? i.e. dip your right shoulder if you're a RHS, or your left shoulder?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lososaurus View Post
A few things I've learned over 2 years of playing ice:

Everyone: Offensively, if you see open ice, take it. Even if you don't have the puck.

Forwards: If you can reach out and touch the other player with the blade of your stick, they're covered.

Defenders: Put an invisible rope between you and your D-Partner. One in the corner, one in front and as one goes to the corner, the other comes to the front.

Defenders: Play the puck up the boards to wingers. Clearing through center is a great way to give up the puck.

Defenders: If you carry the puck deep, make sure a forward has your point. If not, be ready to get right back to it or leave your D-partner out to hang on a 2-1.

Everyone: Never stop moving. If you stop moving, all passes you receive will get picked off.

Defenders: If it looks like your teammate is going to lose the battle, they probably are. Be ready to skate back and have speed so you don't get burned.

Everyone: Stick on the ice. What can you do with your stick off the ice? Take a penalty, that's what.

Goalies: Talk to your defenders. Raise your voice so they can hear you. This isn't the time for your inside voice.
All great tips, but I'd like to clarify the bolded one. When making the breakout pass to the winger, aim for tape to tape, don't just ring it around the boards. With a tape to tape pass the winger has time to make a move before a defender gets to him, if the winger has to pick the puck off the boards he can either miss it entirely, or be slowed down and have a defender on him by the time he gains control of the puck.

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Old
07-19-2011, 11:55 AM
  #84
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Leading shoulder = top hand shoulder when you're taking a forehand shot and bottom hand shoulder with a backhand shot.

I'm assuming it has something to do with getting more core rotation and possibly loading the stick more than just slapping at the puck (not a lot of power there).

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Old
07-19-2011, 12:22 PM
  #85
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Any tips on receiving passes as a winger, from a Dman. Everytime I seem to get one my way, it goes through my stick or I completely misjudge it.
I'm fine on passing drills standing still or skating beside someone passing back and forth.
Learn to play instructer mentioned that maybe the lie on my stick wasnt right for me.

Any suggestions for a noob?

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Old
07-19-2011, 12:26 PM
  #86
Jarick
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Suggestions:

- practice, practice, practice
- check the stick lie and length, it may be easier if the blade is flat on the ice
- grip the stick tighter
- work on skating to the puck if you're missing passes
- work on showing a passing target with the stick to signal where you want to catch it
- work on one-handed knockdowns and catches

Some of the best stuff you can do is just play lots of pickup or shinny...lots of puck time and passing.

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Old
07-19-2011, 12:32 PM
  #87
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Thanks for the suggestions. I try to get as much ice time as possible.
I just want to make sure that the Dmen on my team feel confident in passing up ice to me.

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Old
07-20-2011, 10:58 AM
  #88
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Other things that may help:

- Get your top hand away from your body. A lot of people jam themselves up by having their top hand right next to their body, and that limits your ability to adjust to a slightly-off pass. Get the whole stick away from your body, and you can move it in all different directions to catch the pass.

...forgot the other thing I was going to suggest. Oh, right:

- Practice getting the blade of your stick square to the path of the puck, or slightly angled so the puck bounces either straight in front of you (if it bounces) or in the direction you're planning on moving next. I see a lot of haphazard angles, which makes it difficult to predict where the puck is going to go if it's not a clean catch.

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Old
07-23-2011, 12:21 AM
  #89
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1.Even Bure never skated fast enough to move faster than a puck... passes are thus the best way to get ahead of the play.

2.Last thing a great stickhandler or passer wants to be forced at is going through his opponent.

3.The basis of the offensive is the collapse of the defensive system. Being ahead of the play means you have to be set to attack when your opponent is not in position to defend. Force your opponents to adjust their positioning; even NHL players make positioning the mistake after many movements.

4.Support your teammates! You are strong in unison... make sure you are morally supportive of weaker players, that you're always there to give pass options and ready to move.

5.In fore-checking, it may appear silly to skate when you know the opposition will just turn around you by passing the puck from side to side. But, if you don't cover that ground, you won't be there when they make a silly mistake. Always be ready to jump on the loose puck and always complete your plays - even they seem pointlessly repetitive.

6.If you have to concede space in defense, concede the boards.

7.In most lower levels of the game, you don't need shining skills, just play awareness: look up, they're not so well placed and many force the play.

8.Anatolii Tarasov once said that if a team was to pass the puck 270 times versus only 150 for their opponent, it meant they had 120 more opportunities to work with. Build that sense of team play in your own line-up...

9This one is very important: Have fun!

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Old
07-25-2011, 03:50 AM
  #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Made a slight change to my slapper and backhander yesterday at stick and puck and got a lot more power behind my shots. Dip the leading shoulder before skating into the shot. Seems to get more core rotation or something. Also improved accuracy on slappers, probably making less lateral rotation on the shot.
I tried this today, and man, it worked crazy good. Thanks!

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Old
07-25-2011, 09:19 PM
  #91
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Scoring more goals then the other team usually results in a win, try to do that.

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Old
07-26-2011, 12:04 AM
  #92
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One thing that I need to stop doing: If you're in the corner or behind the net, don't just throw the puck away with an attempt through the crease/slot if you're looking at the ice/boards. If you don't have an option or don't think you do, just eat the puck against the boards and wait for help. If you eat the puck and end up in a battle for it and you lose, FIGHT FOR IT. Don't just let them have it and skate away.

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Old
07-26-2011, 03:49 AM
  #93
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Create your own space, don't rely on others to do it for you.

Come back twice as hard as you went up.

Be Creative and use you strengths to your advantage.

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Old
02-19-2012, 12:09 PM
  #94
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Take the body. The most frustrating thing in a game is watching your forwards forecheck but not take the body. If their defensemen and forwards aren't hit they will NOT slow down hit.


Look at for your guys at the point and crash the net. Also, some USA hockey refs are absoutely horrible at calling games

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Old
02-19-2012, 03:07 PM
  #95
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Top corner isn't the only place to score a goal. A lot of times firing it on the ice will catch a goalie before he goes down in time (especially in lower tier beer leagues) or create a good rebound.

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Old
02-19-2012, 03:37 PM
  #96
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharpshooter101 View Post
1.Even Bure never skated fast enough to move faster than a puck... passes are thus the best way to get ahead of the play.

2.Last thing a great stickhandler or passer wants to be forced at is going through his opponent.

3.The basis of the offensive is the collapse of the defensive system. Being ahead of the play means you have to be set to attack when your opponent is not in position to defend. Force your opponents to adjust their positioning; even NHL players make positioning the mistake after many movements.

4.Support your teammates! You are strong in unison... make sure you are morally supportive of weaker players, that you're always there to give pass options and ready to move.

5.In fore-checking, it may appear silly to skate when you know the opposition will just turn around you by passing the puck from side to side. But, if you don't cover that ground, you won't be there when they make a silly mistake. Always be ready to jump on the loose puck and always complete your plays - even they seem pointlessly repetitive.

6.If you have to concede space in defense, concede the boards.

7.In most lower levels of the game, you don't need shining skills, just play awareness: look up, they're not so well placed and many force the play.

8.Anatolii Tarasov once said that if a team was to pass the puck 270 times versus only 150 for their opponent, it meant they had 120 more opportunities to work with. Build that sense of team play in your own line-up...

9This one is very important: Have fun!
thought this was a great post for ANY level of player....

for a new player a few i see as "small/yet big" tips would be (and they have already been said)...

1. you have more time then you think/dont force a pass- if your going to force a pass learn to draw a player to you and MAKE SURE you can atleast get the puck deep

2. FIND OPEN ICE/keep moving- your not a good option and your not going to get the puck if you are covered, i mean look at it this way; when you have the puck and are looking to make a pass are you going to pass it to someone who isnt moving and has a player anywhere close to them?

3. if you are a forward (assuming this isnt a odd man rush) and you are inside/below the dots shoot the puck

4. the boards are your friend-use them....

5. talk to your team mates and ask for help/advice-if your new you will start to realize that alot of teams have players who have played together for years, this will not only make you better by learning from others, but will create some chemistry (if you will)

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Old
02-19-2012, 04:36 PM
  #97
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Wear clean underwear. You never know.

Oh, and please, hit the ****ing net if you're gonna wind up and take a slapper when I'm wide open on the wing on a 2 on 1. It's really not the time to play Guy Lafleur and try to pick a corner, unless you like turning right around and chasing the other team on their own odd man rush the other way.

And hockey is not about rushing every puck to the net and taking a shot on every break in. Controlling the puck in the offensive zone below the goal line and cycling is also a good strategy I've heard.

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Old
02-20-2012, 03:11 PM
  #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
All great tips, but I'd like to clarify the bolded one. When making the breakout pass to the winger, aim for tape to tape, don't just ring it around the boards. With a tape to tape pass the winger has time to make a move before a defender gets to him, if the winger has to pick the puck off the boards he can either miss it entirely, or be slowed down and have a defender on him by the time he gains control of the puck.
I play wing, and this happens to me all the time.

I'm not the fastest guy out there, and the opposing D-men are usually standing still at the blue line, so when my team gets the puck I'm usually trying to get behind the defense right away.

I can't even count the number of times my D-men will try and fire a bank pass off the boards to me, and every time it winds up in my feet or I can't control it.

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Old
02-20-2012, 03:41 PM
  #99
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Not sure if this has been mentioned yet, but if you find yourself streak up the wing and someone is playing you close to the boards try passing it to yourself off the boards.

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Old
02-20-2012, 05:42 PM
  #100
SkyKushryd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickmata View Post
Oh, and please, hit the ****ing net if you're gonna wind up and take a slapper when I'm wide open on the wing on a 2 on 1. It's really not the time to play Guy Lafleur and try to pick a corner, unless you like turning right around and chasing the other team on their own odd man rush the other way.
Also this.

So much this.

I play on monday nights with this one guy, and every time I get a 2 on 1 with him, i just peel to the boards and wait for the puck to come around to me, because he never hits the net.

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