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Old
07-21-2011, 04:33 PM
  #51
BillyShoe1721
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D Bill Juzda



2x Stanley Cup Champion
2x All Star Game Participant
AHL 2nd-Team All Star, 1953

Quote:
Bill Juzda, a hard hitting, stay at home defenseman in the 1940s, had two nicknames.

He was best known as "The Beast" because of his physical exuberance he preferred while delivering defensive excellence, shutting down even the most explosive of the NHL's offensive stars.

But if there was one star he was best known for battling it was Montreal's Rocket Richard. Their continuing war earned Juzda the unofficial moniker of Richard's Anglo Nemesis.

In fact, the 5'9" and 180lb defenseman who was known for his bone-rattling bodychecks is best remembered for the night he hit Rocket Richard so hard that the Plexiglas broke. Plexiglas was still new back then, and no one thought it could be broken.

Juzda was an old school defenseman if there ever was one. He cared not about offense. He only scored 14 goals and 68 points in 398 games. But he took immense pride in his defensive play. The bruising bodychecker played the game rough and tough, but his penalty minute totals were very reasonable - just 398 minutes in as many games.

Juzda started his pro career with the New York Rangers in 1940-41. His career was interrupted for a couple of years when he served as a pilot in the Second World War. He was traded to the Leafs in 1948, and was an all-star in 1948 and '49. He won Stanley Cups with the Leafs in 1949 and 1951 before leaving the NHl in 1952.
http://mapleleafslegends.blogspot.co...ill-juzda.html

Quote:
Defenceman Bill Juzda used his 5'9" 190 lb. frame to punish opposing forwards with some of the hardest open ice hits of his era. He was not blessed with immense talent in the areas of skating and puck handling but he played his position effectively and was a difficult defender to get past.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=13146

Quote:
Bill Juzda was the nemesis of Rocket Richard.

A giant among hockey players known for his running battles with Montreal
Canadiens star Rocket Richard has died.


Bill "The Beast" Juzda, who also won two Stanley Cups as a stay-at-home
defenceman with the Toronto Maple Leafs, died of cancer at age 87.

Stay-at-home was an apt description of Juzda in retirement, too. After his
playing career was over, he returned to his hometown Winnipeg, where he
worked as an engineer with the CPR. He coached amateur hockey at all levels,

A famous photograph shows Juzda and Rocket Richard after Juzda bodychecked
the Rocket into the boards and shattered the glass. "He was very
competitive. He was known as Rocket Richard's Anglo nemesis," Stuart said.


In another famous photo, he's on the ice when Bill Barilko scored the
Cup-winning overtime goal for the Maple Leafs in 1951.

He earned his nickname The Beast because of his crushing bodychecks. "He was
a very defensive defenceman, the old-fashioned kind," said Stuart.
"Actually, if you look at the penalty minutes, he had very few."
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.o...21847cb20c0768

Quote:
William Juzda (October 29, 1920 - February 17, 2008) was a Canadian professional ice hockey defencemen from Winnipeg, Manitoba. He played with the Toronto Maple Leafs and New York Rangers of the National Hockey League and won two Stanley Cups with the Leafs in 1949 and 1951. Although not a prolific goal scorer Juzda built a reputation as one of hockey's hardest hitters.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Juzda

Quote:
When the Winnipeg Maroons toured Czechoslovakia in the 1950's and '60s, hockey veterans still referred to a bone rattling hit as a "Juzda".
http://books.google.com/books?id=EfR...0juzda&f=false

Quote:
Players like Turk Broda, Bill Juzda, Bill Barilko, and Bill Mosienko achieved star status in the 1940s.
http://books.google.com/books?id=EJo...0juzda&f=false

Quote:
On defense the top four were Jimmy Thomson, Gus Mortson, Bill Juzda, and Barilko. None of them contributed much to the attack(Barilko's 6 goals matched the total of the other 3 combined!), but they certainly made life easier for their goalies.
http://books.google.com/books?id=pMX...0juzda&f=false

Quote:
Bill Juzda, a defenseman who had played for the Toronto Maple Leafs and the New York Rangers and was one of the most feared body checkers of his time...
http://books.google.com/books?id=urX...0juzda&f=false

Quote:
Bill Juzda flashed a sensational solo dash that carried him the length of the rink to his first score as a Ranger
http://www.google.com/search?q=bill+...w=1280&bih=861

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07-21-2011, 05:02 PM
  #52
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LW Alexander Bodunov



2x World Championships Gold Medalist
4x Soviet League Champion
1974 Best Line Award Winner in Soviet League

Study of 2nd tier Soviet scorers

PlayerDraft PositionInternational GPGDomestic GPG
Alexander Bodunov1,122.407.545
Alexander Yakushev207.656.600
Vladimir Vikulov477.559.538
Vladimir Shadrin352.420.479
Yuri Lebedev786.179.383
Vyacheslav Anisin1,074.353.346
Viktor Zhluktov795.405.434
Sergei Kapustin877.577.536

As you can see, Bodunov has a better domestic GPG average than all of these guys, except Yakushev despite being picked much, much later than most. His international GPG isn't as impressive, but considering where he was picked in comparison to these guys being not so far off is still quite good. Offensively, he is on the same level as a lot of these guys that were picked way before him.

Quote:
Alexander Bodunov was one of the top scorers of the Soviet hockey in the 1970's. As an essential part of the promising Lebedev-Anisin-Bodunov line, he began his career playing for the Red Army club and, then, led the undistinguished Krylya Sovetov Moscow to the gold medals of the Soviet championship in 1974. His line was instrumental in various international tournaments played by Team USSR in that decade. Bodunov had an extremely powerful slapshot. He was famous for his goals scored after an instant rapid shot made without any visible preparations.
http://www.chidlovski.com/personal/1...oster/ru24.htm

Quote:
Alexander Bodunov left quite an impression on fans in Winnipeg during the 1972 Summit Series.

Bodunov was one of the members of the Soviet's "Kid Line," also dubbed the "Headache Line" by Canadian broadcaster Brian Conacher. Bodunov was the left winger who was introduced along with fellow linemates Viacheslav Anisin and Yuri Lebedev in game three of the series.

This trio re-energized the Soviets when the debuted in Winnipeg. The Soviets handily won game one, and even though they claim they felt like they played better in game 2, lost convincingly to a recharged Team Canada.

Game three was in many ways a very pivotal match. It ended in a tie but was a moral loss for Canada.

The key for the Soviets early success was the element of surprise they could utilize, as Canada knew almost nothing about their opponent. After two games Canada had learned much about them.

Then the kid line entered the scene.

Canada didn't pay much attention to these three unknowns prior to the game. Why would they? These three youngsters surely couldn't be better than any three players they replaced - if they were they would have been playing since game one. And the Soviets had publicly said that these three were being inserted so that they could "learn" and make themselves better players for the future.

But the Kid Line, as dubbed by the Canadian media, played a pivotal role in the game. Canada held a 4-2 lead half way through the second period when these kids took over. First at 14:59, Lebedev brought the Soviets back to within one goal. Then, with about 1 and 1/2 minutes left in the second stanza, Alexander Bodunov snapped home a shot from the crease to beat Tony Esposito and knot the game at 4.

Bodunov's goal proved to be the final goal of the game, as goalies Esposito and, in particular, Vladislav Tretiak shut the door.

After making quite a name for themselves in game 3 in Winnipeg, the Kid Line was not often heard from again, at least not as far as Canadians knew. The big names like Kharlamov, Petrov, Mikhailov and Tretiak would continue to be great players, but the three heroes of game 3 did not join them as Soviet stars.

The trio did leave CSKA Moscow to join Boris Kulagin to join Krylja Sovetov. The trio led the Moscow based team to an upset victory over CSKA in 1974 to claim the USSR league championship.

But they were not always used on the national team, or would be used separately, as the 1970s progressed.

On one night he could be the best player on the ice, but the next he would be nowhere to be found. He had a great arsenal of hockey talent, featuring his heavy shot and creative play making.
http://internationalhockeylegends.bl...r-bodunov.html

Quote:
Meanwhile, to everyone's surprise, Vsevolod Bobrov and Boris Kulagin made 5 changes to the Soviet team, inserting youth and more speed. The line of Alexander Bodunov and Yuri Lebedev, centered by Vyacheslav Anisin, I later dubbed the "Headache" Line, as that was what they became for Canada.
http://books.google.com/books?id=xKq...odunov&f=false

Quote:
Bodunov and Lebedev produced the last two Russian goals for the tie and Anisin, for fast, fast relief, helped set up both. At the end of the game, the young trio was skating strongly while Canada's veterans were tiring again.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...+bodunov&hl=en


Last edited by BillyShoe1721: 08-02-2011 at 08:50 PM.
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Old
07-21-2011, 08:10 PM
  #53
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G Daren Puppa



2nd in Vezina Trophy Voting, 1990
3rd in Vezina Trophy Voting, 1996
2nd in All Star Voting, 1990
5th in All Star Voting, 1996
1x NHL All Star Game Participant
2x Top 9 Wins(1, 9)
3x Top 6 SV%(2, 3, 6)
4x Top 9 GAA(5, 7, 8, 9)
5x Top 10 Shutouts(3, 6, 9, 9, 10)
2x Tampa Bay Lightning MVP

Tampa Bay Franchise Leader in Wins
Tampa Bay Franchise Leader in Shutouts
Tampa Bay Franchise Leader in Starts

Quote:
In 1995–96, Puppa's stellar goaltending was a major factor in the Lightning earning their first playoff berth in team history. The team took the heavily-favoured Philadelphia Flyers to six games before losing in the first round.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daren_Puppa

Quote:
Puppa stepped onto the ice and established a reputation as a talented youngster known primarily only by the locals.

With the Sabres, Puppa made an instant splash in his NHL debut, shutting out Wayne Gretzky and the Oilers 1-0. But the bigger challenge he faced was to wrestle the number-one stopper's post away from incumbent Tom Barrasso. That took three years of patient waiting.

He finally got the starting job in 1989-90. As a strong, stand-up goalie in the tradition of Ken Dryden, Puppa won 31 games and was runner-up to Patrick Roy in balloting for the Vezina Trophy.

In 1993, he was shipped to the Leafs where he played eight games before being claimed first by the Panthers and then by the Lightning in the Expansion Draft of 1993. Puppa assumed starting duties with Tampa Bay for his first three seasons. By year three, his strong goaltending began to reflect itself in the win/loss column as he racked up 29 wins, 19 losses, and nine ties, topped off by the Lightning's first trip to the playoffs in 1996.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=18356

Quote:
"No Buffalo goalie has been on a hotter spot than the rangy Puppa was in his first regular season start, facing the offensively-awesome Edmonton Oilers in their own Northlands Coliseum. Daren was more than equal to the task, shutting out the Gretzky-led Oilers with as fine a performance as was turned in during the 1985-86 schedule and earning NHL player-of-the-week honors for the whitewashing."
-1986-87 Buffalo Sabres Fact Book and Media Guide

Quote:
"Puppa erased almost all concerns about his ability to come up big in big games last season, and he even won a playoff game while suffering from a severe back strain. The Lightning could have extended the Flyers to seven games or even defeated them in their first-round series had Puppa been healthy. He's that good, and his third-place finish in the voting for the Vezina Trophy is an indication he's finally getting the recognition he deserves.
-Sporting News Hockey Yearbook 1996-97

Quote:
"On the ice, it is up to Puppa and the kids. The goalie may steer this team back to the playoffs, even as growing pains are felt."
-The Hockey News 1997-98 Yearbook

Quote:
"Puppa has become the NHL's forgotten man due to his frequent bouts with persistent back troubles. When healthy, Puppa has guided teams to great heights on the strength of his goaltending. The veteran is big for a goaltender and covers a lot of net.
-The Sports Forecaster 1999-2000

Quote:
In a new town, new franchise-- Puppa was the starter for the Bolts and kept them in it for the most part. Though in his 63 games, Puppa went 22-33-6, his GAA of 2.71 showed it wasn't on him for losing the games that they did. The shortened-season in 1994-95 got Puppa closer to making the Bolts a contender with a 14-19-2 record and 2.68 GAA and in the 1995-96 season, Puppa's efforts were rewards. That season, Puppa was able to get the Bolts in the playoffs with his play, even with the injuries he had during the season (sprained wrist, knee surgery, back issues). The record of 29-16-9 aided the Bolts to the playoffs for the first time in franchise history.
http://scottywazz.blogspot.com/2009/...ren-puppa.html

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Old
07-22-2011, 10:10 PM
  #54
Jafar
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JASON SMITH



Quote:
Originally Posted by hockeylegends
After being selected in the first round by the New Jersey Devils in the 1992 Entry Draft, Jason Smith carried on a great junior career, winning several accolades. As a Regina Pats, he was named to the WHL's all-rookie team in 1992 and first all-star team in 1993. He was also named the league's outstanding defenceman, winning the Bill Hunter Trophy the same year as the captain of the team. Smith was also a member of the gold medal-winning Team Canada at the World Junior Championships in 1993

After a few years in Toronto, Smith was traded to the Oilers in 1999 and settled in to his new club, becoming the captain for the 2001-02 season after Doug Weight was traded to the St. Louis Blues. Smith followed in the captaincy footsteps of such Oiler greats as Wayne Gretzky, Mark Messier, and Kevin Lowe.

The 2003-04 season marked Smith's fifth with the Oilers. Known more for his gritty play, Smith surpassed the 700-games played plateau in 2003-04 and continues to be one of the teams leaders both on and off the ice.

Following a year away from NHL hockey due to the lock out year, Smith would lead a surprising Oiler team as captain into the NHL Stanley Cup Finals in 2006. However, after a grueling seven game series the Edmonton Oilers would finish one win shy of the Stanley Cup after being defeated by the Carolina Hurricanes.

In 2006-07, the Oilers struggled and failed to qualify for the playoffs. During the off-season the club began to rebuild and dealt Captain Jason Smith and Joffrey Lupul to the Philadelphia Flyers in exchange for Joni Pitkanen and forward Geoff Sanderson. In his first and only season in Philadelphia, Smith Captained a rebuilt Flyers squad to an Eastern Conference showdown against their inter-state rivals from Pittsburgh. Despite the fact that the Penguins won the series, the Flyers' turnaround from the worst team in the league to their status in 2007-08 was a credit to Smith's leadership abilities.

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07-22-2011, 10:19 PM
  #55
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CARL LISCOMBE LW



Awards and Achievements:
Stanley Cup Champion (1943)
3 x Stanley Cup Finalist (1941, 1943, 1945)

Calder Cup Champion (1949)

2 x Les Cunningham Winner (1948, 1949)
John B. Sollenberger Winner (1948)

Scoring:
Points – 4th
Goals – 2nd , 10th , 17th , 20th
Assists – 12th

Play-off Points – 1st, 3rd , 4th , 10th
Play-off Goals – 1st , 2nd ,3rd , 6th
Play-off Assists – 2nd , 4th , 9h
From 1941 to 1945, Liscombe was, by quite a large margin, the leading play-off scorer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DRW legends
Anticipating the retirement of Herb Lewis and disappointed with the showing of his Stanley Cup champions at the start of the 1937-38 season, manager Jack Adams of Detroit brought up Carl Liscombe from Pittsburgh of the AHL.

Carl was about the same build as Lewis and had many of his attributes, being fast and a smart stickhandler. He led his the team offensively, scoring goals in bunches. In one game in his rookie season he scored three goals in 1 minute and 52 seconds, a record that would stand until Bill Mosienko scored his famous 21 second hat trick in 1951-52. In the same game he dropped the gloves with Red Horner, universally considered hockey's baddest man.

He was on a first place team and Stanley Cup winner in 1942-43 playing on the top line with Syd Howe and Mud Bruneteau. In the playoffs he led the scorers with 6 goals and 8 assists.

The following year was his best individual season when he scored a whopping 36 goals and had 73 points in 50 games in 1943-44. He finished 2nd in NHL goal scoring and 4th in NHL point scoring. In the final game of the playoff series with Boston in the 1944-45 season, he practically won the game single-handedly by scoring 4 goals as the Red Wings won 5-3. The Red Wings would come up short against the Toronto Maple Leafs in the Stanley Cup finals, however.


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07-23-2011, 01:27 PM
  #56
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Philadelphia selects D Jim Dorey



2x WHA Champion
1x WHA 2nd Team All Star
8th in entire WHA in Assists(72-73)
2x Top 3 PIM in NHL(2, 3)
2x Top 12 Goals Among Defensemen, NHL(8, 14)
2x Top 18 Points Among Defensemen, NHL(14, 18)

TOI/Game Ranks for Leafs:

2nd in 68-69(behind Horton, ahead of Ley, M. Pronovost, Pilote)
5th in 69-70(behind Horton, Ley, McKenny, and undrafted)
3rd in 70-71(behind Ley and Baun, ahead of McKenny)
3rd in 71-72(behind Baun and McKenny, ahead of Ley)

Points Rankings On Team Among Defensemen(68-69 to 76-77): 2, 3*, 2, 2, 1, 1, 5**&1**, 1, 1

*-Tied for 2nd in PPG
**-Traded mid-season, 1st in PPG for both teams
All non-1sts were behind: Tim Horton, Jim McKenny

Quote:
Dorey was picked up from Toronto, where the aggressive rearguard made some impressions with his rugged play over 4 NHL seasons. None other than the legendary Tim Horton had predicted big things for Dorey, which was one reason the Rangers acquired him in exchange for Pierre Jarry.

In 4 seasons in the National Hockey League, Dorey, nicknamed Flipper because of his tendency to flip the puck high over the heads of everyone in order to clear the zone, was known as a big lumbering defenseman who took many penalties. In fact in his rookie season he established a then-record 48 penalty minutes in one game en route to a 200 PIM season!

The WHA featured a much weaker collection of defensemen, which allowed Dorey to develop into more than just a physical spare part. He was named to the post season all star team in 1973, his first season in the Association, after scoring 7 goals and 63 points in 75 games. He also led all WHA scorers in assists in the playoffs with 16 in 15 games. Same goes for his 41 penalty minutes.

The following season Dorey played in 77 games with 6 goals and 46 points.

The Whalers moved Dorey back to the city where his major league career started part way through the 1974-75 season. The Whalers sent him to the Toronto Toros in order to complete an earlier transaction that saw New England acquire Wayne Carleton.

Dorey continued to play well with the Toros. He finished the year with a career high 16 goals plus 40 assists for 56 points and up that total in 1975-76 to 60 points based on 9 goals and 51 assists.

The Quebec Nordiques acquired the veteran for the 1976--77 season. He had a good first year in the provincial capital, scoring 13 goals and 47 points. However the following two years would not be as kind to Dorey. Injuries limited him to just 58 games in total, and just 1 goal and 12 points.

But Dorey, described as an undisputed leader with a knack of annoying fans while on the road by Zander Hollander, won't be remembered for that. Instead he'll be remembered for his rock hard style of defense and his fine seasons in the World Hockey Association. He scored 52 times and added 232 helpers for 284 points in 431 WHA games, while adding 617 well earned PIMs. In the NHL he had 25 goals and 99 points in 232 games in addition to 553 minutes in the box.
http://mapleleafslegends.blogspot.co...jim-dorey.html

Quote:
Now Jim Dorey is hitting and the Leafs are in the fight. It may be as simple as that. A 6'1", 192-pounder with a caveman physique, a cherubic face and a shock of brown hair that gives him a misleading look of innocence, Dorey is the new bad man of the NHL. Early in the season though it is, he has been involved in two bench-clearing brawls, several smaller fights and some heavy shoving—and the Leafs, brasher and braver than they have been in years, seem to be responding. "In one month Dorey has already solved a few problems around here," says Imlach, "and before he's through he's going to solve a few more."

Most rookies come to the NHL with a touch of awe and respect, but not Dorey. His most notable bout took place in what was only his second big-league game. Pittsburgh's Ken Schinkel was speeding past Dorey along the boards when he happened to catch a stick on his shoulder pad. Schinkel skated another 15 feet before sprawling to the ice. Given two minutes for high-sticking by Referee Art Skov, Dorey was skating to the penalty box when he noticed that Schinkel was smiling. "That was when I realized he'd taken a dive," Dorey recalls. "I went over and said, 'You took a dive, didn't you?' He said, 'Sure, what are you gonna do about it?' That was when I hit him in the mouth."

"He's an alley fighter, and they're usually the best kind," says Minnesota General Manager Wren Blair, who signed Dorey to his first amateur agreement at age 14. "But he's also a helluva defenseman. When I first saw Dorey I thought he could be in the same league as Bobby Orr, and you can't get any higher."

"Dorey can do a lot more things than fight," says Imlach. "Right now he's a little hotheaded and exuberant. He's trying to make a name for himself, which is fine. But he can become one of the big stars in this league. He can skate and he can shoot pretty well, too. I'll tell you this: if anybody's going to lead us back where we were, this kid will."

But Dorey needs no such invitation to battle. During a memorable exhibition game he came stickless off the bench into a melee to toss a couple of right-hand punches at Detroit's Frank Mahovlich. He skated back to the bench unmarked and unpenalized, but not unappreciated.

"He's back, grinning like hell," said Imlach, "and I go down and tell him he can get in a helluva lot of trouble leaving the bench like that."

"Yeah, Punch," Dorey said, "I know it. But it was worth it."

Imlach had found his cop.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/vau...32/2/index.htm

Quote:
Known for his rugged, yet clean style of play, Jim Dorey enjoyed a lengthy professional hockey career, primarily based on a solid work ethic. He was a fourth-round draft selection of the Toronto Maple Leafs, 23rd overall in 1964 when he was just 17 years old. Dorey had appeared in 21 games that year with the Niagara Falls Flyers of the Ontario League. His final two years of junior were spent with the London Nationals where he scored 25 and 49 points, respectively. Dorey also increased his physical play significantly, drawing 196 minutes in penalties in his final season.

Dorey is probably best remembered for his days patrolling the defense for the Toronto Maple Leafs in the late 1960s and early 1970s at a time when other Leafs players included Dave Keon, Norm Ullman, Ron Ellis, Paul Henderson, and Jacques Plante. Dorey played four full seasons with the Leafs and took it upon himself to handle a good portion of the team's policing duties, registering 200 minutes in penalties in the 1968-69 season and 198 minutes in the 1970-71 campaign.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=12479

Quote:
Dorey was a main cog on the New England Whaler blueline for their first two-and-a-half seasons of existence, 1972-1974. He led New England defensemen in scoring in both 1972-73 (7-56-63 in 75 GP), when he captured an AVCO Cup with the Whalers and was a Second-Team WHA All-Star selection, and 1973-74 (6-40-46 in 77 GP). Dorey was traded by the Whalers to the Toronto Toros in December of 1974 and would remain in the WHA with the rest of its existence, through the 1978-79 season. He won another AVCO Cup in 1976-77, with the Quebec Nordiques, and would finish his WHA career with 431 games-played, 52 goals and 232 assists for 284 points, and 617 penalty minutes.
http://www.oursportscentral.com/serv...es/?id=4140569

Quote:
Defenseman Jim Dorey is the rookie with the can't-miss tag this year in the NHL.

He's tabbed for everything from Rookie-of-the-Year honors to all star defenseman, but coach Punch Imlach of Toronto Maple Leafs is a little more reticent.

He concedes Dorey is an asset where the Leafs need it most-on defence, but says only that the big, rugged 21 year old is "good enough" to play with the Leafs.

At training camp, Imlach was a little more glowing. "I would have to say he's the best looking defenceman in camp. If he doesn't make it, a few people will know about it. He means business."

With the NHL well under way, it looks as if Dorey has made it. He's established himself as fast, nimble, and not afraid of anyone, and has already set a single game record of 48 penalty minutes in a night.

Dorey, six foot one and 195 pounds likes to crunch bodies and fight. He skates almost like a forward and handles the puck well. Some coaches around the league have called him another Bobby Orr.

Dorey likes to dismiss the "quick with the fists" tag, but it is evident he enjoys a scrap.

"I'm not a runner," he says. "I don't go out trying to drive some guy into the boards. But, I do like it when it is rough-the rougher the better. The rougher it is the better I play.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...im+dorey&hl=en

Quote:
The New York Rangers have acquired rugged defenseman Jim Dorey from the Toronto Maple Leafs in exchange for xxx, the young and dissatisfied forward who last season led the Central Hockey League in scoring.

In Dorey, the Rangers get an aggressive player who likes to hit and who still holds the NHL record for most penalties(9) and most penalty minutes(48) in a game.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...im+dorey&hl=en

Quote:
He is Jim Dorey, a young, aggressive, muscular defenseman who figured prominently into the club's long term plans.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...im+dorey&hl=en

Quote:
From that moment on, Leafs' defence has been a purposeful unit. xxx and Rick Ley and especially Jim Dorey, who is Baun's partner, have improved visibly.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...im+dorey&hl=en

Quote:
He indicated the new man on defense would he Jim Dorey, who would give the Rangers muscle in front of the net,
http://www.google.com/search?q=jim+d...w=1280&bih=861

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Old
07-23-2011, 07:38 PM
  #57
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RW Anders Kallur



4x Stanley Cup Champion
3x Top 10 SHG(1, 3, 10)
27th in Goals, 1981
Golden Puck Winner for Best Swedish Player in the World, 1979
1st in SEL in Goals, 1975
Swedish World All Star Team, 1979
3rd in SHG during career(behind Gretzky, Goring)
1st in Playoff SHG from 1981-1984
7th in Assists in NHL playoffs, 82-83
7th in Selke voting, 1980

SH TOI/G Ranks On Team(min. 50 games): 2*, 1, 5**, 2*, 3***, 4****

*Behind Bob Bourne
**Behind Bob Bourne, Trottier, Goring, and undrafted
***Behind Bob Bourne, and Butch Goring
****Behind Trottier, Brent Sutter, and undrafted

Quote:
Anders Kallur was a gifted offensive producer in his native Sweden before becoming a pat of the New York Islanders' Stanley Cup dynasty in the early 1980s. He played only six years in the NHL but had four Stanley Cup rings and 211 career points to show for his work. His strength as a player rested with his blazing speed, quick lateral movement, and vast array of fakes and moves while in motion.

Kallur's timing couldn't have been better as he joined the Isles' as they began a run of four consecutive Stanley Cup titles. Things started slowly for the Swede as he missed most of his first NHL training camp with a groin injury. He was sent to the CHL's Indianapolis Checkers for two conditioning games then returned to Long Island where he worked on a checking line with Bob Bourne and Wayne Merrick as well as a more potent unit with Bryan Trottier and John Tonelli.

His offense and composure under pressure helped him fit in well with one of the NHL's elite clubs. He recorded 22 and 36 goals in his first two NHL seasons then settled into a more specialized checking role since New York had Mike Bossy, Bob Nystrom, and Duane Sutter to supply offense from the right side. During the team's drive to a fourth Cup in 1983, Kallur's playmaking was crucial as he recorded 12 assists in 20 post-season contests. The "drive for five" fell short in the 1984 finals versus Edmonton. Kallur played one more season before retiring in 1985.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=13153

Quote:
steady checkers like Bob Nystrom and clever scorers like Anders Kallur, the Islanders simply have no weaknesses.
http://books.google.com/books?id=LKR...kallur&f=false

Quote:
I think of the speed of Bobby Bourne, xxx, and Anders Kallur.

Still looking to get deeper up the middle, Torrey signed a versatile two-way forward in Anders Kallur, who had been a top player in his native Sweden.
http://books.google.com/books?id=9y9...kallur&f=false

Quote:
Anders Kallur, an unsung forward who scored as many as 36 goals in one Islander season during the championship run...
http://books.google.com/books?id=Yy8...kallur&f=false

Quote:
Coach Arbour's most important decision will be where to play the swift Swede, who missed the playoffs because of an injury. Kallur is usually a right wing, but...
http://books.google.com/books?ei=hRs...#search_anchor

Quote:
They won four straight Stanley Cups, beginning in 1980, with some talented Scandinavians, like Tomas Jonsson, Stefan Persson, Anders Kallur and xxx, playing important roles.
http://www.google.com/search?q=ander...w=1280&bih=861

Quote:
Forwards Bob Bourne, Butch Goring, Bryan Trottier, Mike Bossy, Clark Gillies, and Anders Kallur made up a potent offense.
http://books.google.com/books?id=Qu7...=0CDgQ6AEwAzgo

Quote:
Kallur and the Islanders were the best Tuesday night. The native of Ludvika, Sweden, scored a shorthanded goal and set up a tally by Bryan Trottier in lifting New York to a 4-1 victory.

It was Kallur and the Islanders who did the pushing, pressuring Montreal into rushed plays and forcing a number of giveaways.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...s+kallur&hl=en

Quote:
With Bourne sidelined, versatile forward Anders Kallur suited up. Kallur, a five year veteran but a part timer this season, killed penalties, saw duty on power plays, won the second game against the Capitals with an overtime goal and scored a go ahead goal while the Islanders were shorthanded in Game 5.

"And Andy Kallur? What can you say? Mr. Superstar as far as I'm concerned, I thought he won the game(Wednesday). The guy has played unbelievable since he came in.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...s+kallur&hl=en

Quote:
And defensive specialist Anders Kallur connected ...
http://www.google.com/search?q=ander...w=1280&bih=861

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Old
07-23-2011, 09:35 PM
  #58
Velociraptor
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Ron Duguay, F

Position: Can play any forward position.
HT/WT: 6'2", 200 lbs
Shoots: Right
Nickname(s): "Doogie"



- Played in the NHL All-Star Game in 1982
- 274 goals, 620 regular season points in 870 games played.
- 31 goals, 53 playoff points in 89 games played.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Press
The stingy penaltykilling unit led by Bob Gainey and Ron Duguay has given up just one of those goals on the power play.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Phoenix
If the Americans can stay close enough to threaten pulling an upset with the man advantage, it will be the likes of Goring, Bob Gainey and Ron Duguay who will be called upon to neutralize the effects of Canadian penalties...
The following quotes indicate Duguay's versatility, stating he can play all three forward positions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Press
The New York Rangers reached a multlyear contract agreement with holdout center Ron Duguay
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boston Globe
Ron Duguay and Ken Linseman can both play the left wing
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Phoenix
...Goring noted of his line with left winger Gaieny and right winger Duguay
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
With his long flowing hair and natural good looks, Duguay was a smash hit with the young females on Broadway and the men liked him because he was an excellent hockey player. In his rookie season with the Rangers, Duguay netted 20 goals and assisted on 20 others in the 1977-78 season. Just one year later, the team, led by the likes of 37-yeaer-old Phil Esposito, advanced to the Stanley Cup finals where they lost in five games to the powerhouse Montreal Canadiens.

By now Duguay was firmly entrenched as a fan favourite in New York. The love affair lasted six years, and although Duguay had a 40-goal season in 1981-82, the team was never able to reach the heights achieved during that 1979 run to the Cup finals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Doogs wore number 10 for the Rangers and if you didn't know who he was you quickly found out. On the ice when you saw number 10 skate you also saw the long black locks that would flow in the breeze as he would skate up and down his wing. He has a quick deceptive shot that netted him a career high of 40 goals in the 1981-82 season and won him a spot on the All-Star team.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boca Raton News
Bob Nystrom, the original Islander, deigned to use some rough stuff on Ron Duguay, of all Rangers...

But make no mistake about Ron Duguay. He does not eat quiche. He can take care of himself and he went back at Bob Nystrom and, later in the third period, he challenged the Islander bench. It took guts...and the crowd loved it. The fans loved Ron Duguay this night and they hated Bob Nystrom.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Record-Journal
For the most part the players did keep their cool, but Ron Duguay reminded his teammates that for success in the Brooks system there must be a blend. He pounded Dave Poulin with three vicious punches to the face during the third period of Saturday's final game. Duguay drew a lot of blood from Poulin and 17 minutes in penalties from referee Dave Newell.

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Old
07-23-2011, 09:51 PM
  #59
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Warren Godfrey, D

Position: Defenseman
HT/WT: 6'1", 190
Shoots: Left
Nickname(s): "Rocky"



- Played in the NHL All-Star Game in 1955
- 32 goals, 157 regular season points in 786 games played
- 1 goal, 5 playoff points in 52 games played.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Warren Godfrey, for example. He was hard hitting defenseman most notably with the Wings and Bruins in the 1950s and 1960s. He hit so hard they called him "The Rock" or "Rocky" for short. He played in 786 NHL contests, scoring 32 goals and 157 points.

Godfrey, who came to Detroit from Boston as part of the big trade for Terry Sawchuk, was a main stay in the NHL from 1952 through 1963. He continued on until 1969 ("when my knees wouldn't let me play anymore") often shuttling between Detroit and the minor leagues.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Defenceman Warren Godfrey played nearly 800 NHL games in the 50s and 60s. He was best known as a reliable stay-at-home blueliner on the Detroit Red Wings for many years.

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Old
07-24-2011, 01:06 AM
  #60
Selfish Man
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With pick #165, the Pittsburgh Hornets select Mike Murphy, RW.



- 6'0", 190 lbs
- NHL Captain for 6 Years
- 7 20-goal seasons
- 5 50-point seasons
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1980)

Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord
Murphy is hugely underrated. He is described as a solid, honest, hardworking, strong, and physical forward from his scouting reports, and he was strong defensively as well.

- He [had] 400+ games post expansion who killed at least 30% of their team's penalties throughout their careers (he killed 36%)
- He [had] a career 0.46 adj. ESPPG
- His 556 career points, three 60+ point seasons, and four 25+ goal seasons put him in pretty rare company among any player, not just wingers who killed penalties.
Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1973
Has good size and a hard, accurate shot... fast enough to keep up with Unger, one of the fastest centers around.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1976
Learned aggressive checking under Fred Shero in Omaha...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1977
New breed of captain, in the Bobby Clarke/Jim Schoenfeld mold... spends time on flights pacing the aisles talking with teammates...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1978
falls into the mould of Bobby Clarke - work and inspiration... leadership plus production have placed him as one of the mainstays in Kings' revival...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1979
Even without scoring, he contributes with his leadership and defensive skills... Former coach Bob Pulford eates him among the league's premier two-way players... he's not afraid to dig in the corner for the puck and is a good penalty killer... He calls his play in the defensive zone "the strongest part of my game"...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1980
Heady, unselfish defensive stalwart...especially effective along the boards, he makes deft use of skates to move puck while fending off opponents with arms.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1981
dependable, hard working winger who checks strongly... a strong leader who has achieved success in hockey through hard work... a much-respected man in NHL circles..
He'll captain the squad, play on the third line with Art Jackson and help anchor the PK unit.

70s doing the heavy lifting, once again, in these posts.

http://hfboards.com/showpost.php?p=2...&postcount=575
http://hfboards.com/showpost.php?p=2...&postcount=595

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Old
07-24-2011, 03:12 AM
  #61
Dreakmur
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Aleksander Kozhevnikov


Awards and Acchievements:
Soviet Hockey Hall of Fame (1982)
2 x Olympic Gold Medalist (1984, 1988)
World Championship Gold Medalist (1982)
World Junior Championship Gold Medalist (1978)

Scoring Accompishments:
Points – 2nd(1982), 2nd(1983), 5th(1984), 6th(1988)
Goals – 1st(1982), 2nd(1983), 3rd(1984), 4th(1988)
Assists – 6th(1982), 6th(1983), 8th(1988)

1982 World Championship – 3rd in Goals, 2nd on Soviet Team
1984 Olympics – 11th in Points, 3rd on Soviet Team

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Red Machine
Despite his sedond-place standing in the scoring race, Aleksander Kozhevnikov didn't get an invite to these (1983) championships. He was in the hockey doghouse again. All one had to do was look at Kohevnikov to know that he and the Stalinists would not hit it off. He was lanky, unshaven; his hair shot all over the place and his eyes had an independent, challenging glare. Concomitant with the look was his playing style - rugged, fearless, tempermenta, and uncolonial. He yelled at team-mates, fought with opponents, paid little heed to practice times or cerfews and stole away from the training-camp barracks at every opportunity. That he got as far as he did was a testimony to his dramatic skill with the puck and a bull's-eye shot.
How good was his peak?
1982: Kozhevnikov probably should have been the Soviet league MVP. He had 71 points to Makarov’s 75, but he had 43 goals to Makarov’s 32. He also didn’t have the support of the Green Unit.

1983: Makarov was hurt, and missed about 1/3 of the season, so we’ll account for that. His 25 goals would have been 33 in a full season. Kozhevnikov had 35. Makarov’s 42 points would have been 56. Kozhevnikov had 57.

1984: Kuzhevnikov was hurt, and missed about Ľ of the season, so we’ll account for that as well. Kozhevnikov’s 47 points becomes 59. Makarov has 73. Kozhevnikov’s 33 goals become 41. Makarov had 36. This was probably the Green Unit’s most dominant year – CSKA took 1-4 in the scoring race. Kozhevnikov was 5th.

1988: Makarov had 23 goals to Kozhevnikov’s 25. Makarov, however, did have 68 points to Kozhevniko’s 45. This was another extremely dominant season for CSKA – on the point leader-board, they had 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, and 8. Considering Kozhevnikov played with very mediocre line mates, the gap in points doesn’t seem too bad. I can easily get away with naming his top-scoring team mates, since they’ll never be drafted anyway: Ivan Avdeyev and Sergei Kharin.


Obviously, Makarov was able to maintain this pace for 10 years, and Kozhevnikov kind of fizzled out for a while. He had another excellent season in 1988, when he carried a Krylja Sovetov team into second place. Considering teams and linemates, I think it's very fair to say that Kozhevnikov was among the very elite in the USSR.


Last edited by Hawkman: 08-01-2013 at 06:51 AM.
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Old
07-24-2011, 07:35 AM
  #62
Selfish Man
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With pick #172, the Pittsburgh Hornets select Stewart Evans, D.



- Stanley Cup winner, 1935
- Montreal Maroons Captain 1937-38
- Ranks 11th among defensemen in points during the decade of the 1930s
- Ranks 9th among defensemen in PIM during the same decade
- According to the HOH forum, finished just behind Earl Seibert for 2nd Team All-Star for 37-38 (received more total votes, but fewer first team votes)
- The Detroit Red Wings organization used to (or still does?) present a Stew Evans trophy for sportsmanlike excellence

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Stewart Evans had a nine-year NHL career that began in 1930-31 with the Detroit Falcons. In 43 games Evans one goal and four assists and five points.

In 1931-32, Evans was sent to play Detroit Olympics of the IHL where he had three goals and 12 points. In 1932-33 Evans was back in the NHL with the Detroit Red Wings, who evolved from the old Falcons team. He had two goals and eight points as well as 74 penalty minutes.

Midway through the 1933-34 season Evans was traded to the Montreal Maroons, where he scored four goals and two assists in 27 games. Evans played five seasons with the Maroons and was a member of their Stanley Cup winning team in 1935. Individually, his best season was 1936-37 when he had six goals and seven assists for 13 points in 48 games.

Evans' final year in the NHL was 1938-39 with the Montreal Canadiens where he scored nine points in 43 games. For his career he played in 367 games, had 28 goals, 49 assists, and 77 points.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Windsor Daily Star Dec. 10, 1937
Stew Evans, big Maroon defenseman, and a former Red Wing, led the winning drive... Evans scored twice on lone rushes that carried him crashing through the Detroit defense early in the last period
.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Leader-Post Dec. 10, 1937
"Did you see that man Evans?" [King Clancy]

None among the meagre 3000 could have missed seeing Stew Evans, who barged up from his defence position to score the third and fourth Maroon goals - his first of the year - in the third period.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Border Cities Star Apr. 3, 1935
Unlike the Boston Bruins, who had only Eddie Shore and Babe Siebert for the heavy defensive end, Maroons have four first-rate rearguards. From end to end they rate higher than the Bruins -- who were tough enough for the Leafs in the National League finals.

Montreal's rear division men, Lionel Conacher, Allan Shields, Marvin Wentworth and Stew Evans, may break on a rush to relieve pressure but otherwise they are expected to sit tight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskatoon Star-Phoenix Apr. 5, 1935
The Conachers -- Lionel of Maroons and Charlie of Leafs -- didn't come together once. Stew Evans and Allan Shields were the Montreal defensemen looking after Charlie's side of the rink. They did high class work keeping out the big Toronto marksman.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Calgary Daily Herald Feb. 20, 1935
The trouble started at Montreal when Horner boarded Herbie Cain. He was on his way to the penalty box when Stew Evans attacked him and after the fist fight had been quelled Horner and Marvin Wentworth, who was confused with Evans by the officials, each got majors.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meriden Record Mar. 14, 1939
Red Horner, with 75 minutes in penalties, continued in the 'bad man' role for the league while Stew Evans of Montreal took second to Toronto firebrand with 58 minutes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette Apr. 10, 1935
Maroons defence made the difference between a cup-winning team and an also ran. Led by Wentworth, Conacher, Shields and Evans played great hockey. The feature of the Maroons play right through the series was their marvellous defensive game, backed by superb goaltending by Connell. In the pinches, Maroons defence stood out as the class of the league.



A Stanley Cup champion and Captain of the Montreal Maroons, Evans will provide the squad with leadership and steady defensive play on the blueline. He'll serve as the Hornets' second Alternate Captain.

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Old
07-24-2011, 02:55 PM
  #63
DaveG
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Borrowing from my bio on Meloche from the AAA draft:

Goaltender Gilles Meloche



NHL All Star Game: 1980, 1982
Top 5 in shutouts 3 times, top 10 in shutouts 7 times
backstopped the Minnesota North Stars to the 1981 Stanley Cup Finals
8th in Ties/OT/SOL all time


Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
Gilles Meloche was a talented netminder who appeared in nearly 800 games during the 1970s and '80s. He was a true workhorse who saw action in at least 40 games 13 times in his career. His best years came with the strong Minnesota North Stars clubs in the early '80s.

The Montreal native was selected 70th overall by the Chicago Black Hawks at the 1970 Amateur Draft after a solid junior career with the Verdun Junior Maple Leafs. After starring in 45 games for the Leafs in 1969-70, he was named to the QJHL's first all-star squad. Meloche spent most of the 1970-71 season with the IHL's Flint Generals but had little hope of playing for the parent club who had Tony Esposito and Gary Smith between the pipes.

The young backstopper welcomed the trade that brought him to the defensively weak California Golden Seals. During the 1971-72 season, he created a stir by registering four shutouts and a 3.33 goals against average. He continued to provide goaltending heroics for the next few years including the franchise's two-year relocation to Cleveland.

Following the Barons' merge with the Minnesota North Stars, Meloche started to experience winning. In 1979-80, he backstopped the club to 27 wins and led them to a quarterfinals victory over the Montreal Canadiens which ended their four-Cup dynasty. The next year, he combined with youngster Don Beaupre to form one of the best goalkeeping tandems in the league. Meloche took part in the NHL All-Star Game and won eight playoff games during Minnesota's run to the finals.

Meloche continued to work his share of games for the North Stars through the 1984-85 season. In 1982, he won a bronze medal when he represented Canada at the World Championships and helped Minnesota reach the semi-finals in 1984. He played his last three years with the Pittsburgh Penguins before retiring in 1988.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelletier
Judging a hockey player based on his stats often leads to inaccuracies, particularly when it comes to goaltenders. Gilles Meloche is the perfect example of this.

He surrendered 2756 goals against, more than anyone else in history. His 270-351-131 career record is pretty weak, and his 351 losses is only one shy of the NHL record - set by Hall of Famer Gump Worsley, who played nearly 900 games.

One would decipher from those stats that Gilles wasn't a very good puck stopper. But in actuality nothing could be further from the truth. Quick, agile and a tremendous attitude were his trademarks. Meloche was a very good goalie on some VERY bad teams. If Meloche had played in Montreal during the 70s and Ken Dryden played in Oakland and Cleveland, then we very well might be saying Meloche is one of the all time greats and Dryden would be the one with the poor numbers.

Gilles actually got his start in the NHL with Chicago. He was a happy 70th overall draft pick of the Hawks in 1970 as Gilles grew up idolizing Hawk legend Glenn Hall. Meloche played his first pro year with the IHL's Flint Generals but did appear in two NHL games when Hawks backup ******* broke his arm. It was a good debut for Gilles - he won his first two starts - 6-4 in Vancouver and 5-2 against the California Golden Seals.

Those were the only two games Meloche ever played for Chicago. In the summer the Hawks sent ******* to Oakland for *******. However ******* broken arm had not healed properly and the NHL nullified the trade. The two teams agreed to new terms and this time Meloche and defenseman Paul Shmyr were sent out west.

An interesting story happened immediately after the trade. Shmyr and Meloche disappeared for the next three days. There was much speculation that two would not report to California as they never showed up for their flight. However Shmyr had wanted his car with him out west, so he convinced the young Meloche to join him as they drove 3 days across the country!

You probably wouldn't have blamed anyone for not wanting to go the Seals franchise though. Soon the WHA would raid their roster and they became the NHL's doormats. But Meloche very much enjoyed his time there and looks back on it fondly.

"Oakland didn't have a very good team for most of my time there, but those were good years for me because I was in my early twenties and playing 50 to 60 games a year. I just wanted to play the game. When you're losing three games out of four, four games out of five, its easy to lose your confidence. But I was getting great press and the fans were always with me. I just enjoyed playing the game and I was having fun so I really didn't mind my days in Oakland. I was in the NHL and that was all that mattered," remembered Meloche in Dick Irvin's great book In The Crease.

With such an awful record the Seals were having trouble making a go of it in Oakland, and the team finally moved in 1976 to Cleveland and became the Barons. Meloche accompanied the team to Cleveland, but as Gilles recalls, not much changed.

snip

In 1978 the Barons merged with the Minnesota North Stars. Meloche described his time in Minnesota as "the best time in my career."

"The North Stars had finished in last place overall the year before and they ended up picking Bobby Smith, Steve Payne and Craig Hartsburg in one draft. My first year there we missed the playoffs by three or four points but we made them the next six years and they were great years."

Great was right, especially in 1980 and 1981.

In 1980 the North Stars faced off with the 4 time defending Stanley Cup champion Montreal Canadiens. The heavily favored Habs were looking for their unthinkable 5th Cup in a row! But Meloche and the Stars had a different idea. Meloche was brilliant - so brilliant that long time hockey broadcaster Dick Irvin said "Meloche's goaltending in that series rates among the best I have ever seen in the playoffs!"

Meloche, who had been criticized for not being a "big game" goaltender, shook that label with a 3-0 shutout victory in the Montreal Forum in game one. The very next night the Stars again shocked the Habs with a 4-1 win! The Habs stormed back in the next three games and took a 3-2 series lead, but the Stars continued to fight on. The Stars forced a game 7 with a 5-2 win in Minnesota in game 6. Then the exciting game 7 showdown in Montreal was played. Minnesota's Al MacAdam scored the winner on ******* with around 2 minutes left to play as Meloche backstopped the Stars to one of hockey's biggest playoff upsets.

"That was the greatest thrill of my career" later admitted Meloche.

The Stars bowed out to Philadelphia in the next round of the playoffs, but the next year they made it all the way to the finals where they met the New York Islanders, who won the Cup in 1980. It was an exciting ride for the Stars and their fans, but Meloche knew they were heavy underdogs.

"You know, you get into a series where you don't think you have too much of a chance to win and that's bad because the mental edge has something to do with it. We weren't really in the series but it was still a thrill. I remember losing on the Island and seeing the Stanley Cup on the ice. You know then why its something everybody dreams about."

Meloche continued to play with the Stars until the conclusion of the 1984-85 season.

snip

Gilles finally landed in Pittsburgh where he finished his career with 3 more seasons. Following his playing days he became a goalie consultant and scout for the Pens.

So there you have it - one of hockey's better goalies with some of hockey's worst records
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reading Eagle, Apr 19th, 1981
"We had double their chances, but we didn't get the breaks" Buffalo coach Roger Nielsen said after Minnesota's 5-2 triumph Friday night.

"It wasn't a 5-2 game the way both teams were skating" said Minnesota coach Glen Sonmor "Meloche was just exceptionally sharp. I don't think Edwards blew it, I just think Gilles had it going."
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Telegraph, Jan 3rd, 1980
"We didn't really want to open it up but we didn't have any choice" said Boston coach Fred Creighton "They're fast and Meloche was awfully good in the last period"

Meloche, the kind of goalie who can make a difference in the playoffs, made 22 saves including several in the 3rd period.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pittsburgh Press, Dec 28th, 1979
The Minnesota North Stars are moving and a big reason is the goaltending of Gilles Meloche

"He's just a tremendous goalkeeper and he gives his team a lot of confidence." Washington coach Danny Belisle said last night after Meloche backstopped Minnesota to a 6-1 victory over the Capitals. "I feel the difference with this club, compared to the last night we played them, is Meloche."


Last edited by DaveG: 07-24-2011 at 08:29 PM.
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Old
07-24-2011, 08:04 PM
  #64
BillyShoe1721
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I'll take F Mike Krushelnyski



1x NHL All Star Game Participant
3x Stanley Cup Champion
13th in Goals in NHL, 1985
26th in Points in NHL, 1985
.6157 career adjusted PPG during 7 year peak

PK TOI Ranks in Boston, LA & TOR: 1, 2(barely behind Middleton), 3(behind Gilmour, undrafted), 3(behind Gretzky, Kasper), 4(behind Gretzky, Nicholls, Duguay), 4(behind Damphousse, undrafted, undrafted), 5(behind Gilmour, Zezel, undrafted, undrafted)

So, Krushelnyski was usually on the 1st or 2nd PK unit on every team he was on, except on a stacked Oilers team.

Quote:
Mike grew up skating on frozen ponds in and around his hometown of Montreal. It was there that he learned the fundamentals of the game that led him to an NHL career of almost 900 games.

Mike was a big boy by the time he reached the NHL, playing at 6'2" and anywhere from 200 to 215 pounds. His long stride made up for his lack of natural speed. That compensation helped to make him one of the better skaters in the league. He had a powerful stride and good balance made him very agile for such a large player.

Mike also was very gifted with his hands. A good faceoff man, he was a good puckhandler who could dance the puck past a defenseman. He had good vision and anticipation and a long reach to aid him in his goal scoring pursuits.

Krushelnyski was originally drafted by Boston in the eighth round of the 1979 Entry Draft. He spent two years in the organization before he joined the Bruins full time in 1982-83. He scored 23 goals and 65 points in his rookie season and quickly became regarded as one of the best young players in hockey.

Mike slipped to 45 points in his following season. He did improve to 25 goals but otherwise he was considered to be a victim of the dreaded "sophomore jinx." Yet that didn't keep the Edmonton Oilers away. They offered speedy veteran Ken Linseman prior to the 1984-85 season and the Bruins jumped on the one-for-one swap.

In his first year with the Oilers, Krushelnyski enjoyed a banner season. He recorded career-highs in goals (43), assists (45) and points (88) and was third in the NHL with a plus-56 rating. He even played in the 1985 All-Star Game. He also helped the Oilers capture the Stanley Cup championship that year.

The Oilers had hoped Krushelnyski would be the guy who could play on the left side of Wayne Gretzky and Jari Kurri, a hole that was never really filled until Esa Tikkanen arrived in the late 1980s. "Krusher" was given as good a shot as anyone to play with #99 and #17, but as the season wore on it became more and more obvious that Mike wasn't the right guy on that line either. He spent most of the Stanley Cup playoffs on other units, particularly as a third line shutdown center.

"(Krushelnyski) has a lot of skill, in addition to his size and strength," said John Muckler, Glen Sather's co-coach. "But there are psychological problems involved in working with Gretzky. You have to do things on blind faith, assuming he'll get the puck to you, and that's hard to do. A lot of times, Krush was so astounded by what was happening that he'd fail to react. He couldn't believe the pass he'd just received so there'd be no shot at all."

As Mike's true value to the Oilers became obvious as a third line checker and grinder, his offensive numbers went down. He scored only 16 goals in each of the next two seasons, and 40 and 51 points respectively. He upped that to 20 goals and 47 points in 1987-88 - his final season in Edmonton.

Despite his lack of scoring "Special K" remained a solid contributor to the Oilers success as the Oilers won the Cup in both 1987 and 1988.

Prior to the 1988-89 campaign, Krushelnyski was part of the biggest trades in NHL history. On August 9, 1988, he was traded to the Los Angeles Kings with Gretzky and Marty McSorley for Jimmy Carson, Martin Gelinas, and Los Angeles’ first-round choices in 1989, 1991 and 1993.

Krushelnyski played parts of three seasons with the Kings before he was traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs during the 1990-91 season in exchange for John McIntyre. The Kings were hoping McIntyre could be a younger version of Krushelnyski at that time, while the Leafs were looking for Mike's experience and leadership. He was with Toronto for four unspectacular seasons before signing for one year with the Detroit Red Wings as a free agent during the summer of 1994.
http://oilerslegends.blogspot.com/20...shelnyski.html

Quote:
Mike Krushelnyski was a versatile forward who was equally proficient at left wing and centre. He was a good stickhandler with a long each who could score, set up plays and check.

Krushelnyski enjoyed a fine rookie season in 1982-83 with 65 points playing with Barry Pederson and Rick Middleton. In the post-season he scored eight goals while helping Boston reach semi-finals. After two more solid years in Beantown he was traded to the Edmonton Oilers for Ken Linseman.

He scored 43 goals in 1984-85 playing with Wayne Gretzky and was chosen to participate in the NHL All-Star Game that season. "Krusher" scored 13 points in 18 games while helping the Oilers repeat as Stanley Cup champions.

Starting in 1985-86 Krushelnyski settled into a more defensive role on an Oilers squad that was loaded with offensive players. His ability on faceoffs along with strong two-way play was an under-appreciated component of Edmonton's Stanley Cup triumphs in 1987 and 1988.

In August 1988 he was part of the monumental trade to the Los Angeles Kings with Gretzky. Krushelnyski scored 62 points his first year in L.A. before his play dropped off and he was traded to Toronto for John McIntrye early in 1990-91. The Leafs were struggling and hoped Krushelnyski would bring savvy and a winning attitude to the club. He started slowly but ended up playing a solid checking role for Toronto while supplying offence on occasion.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=10844

Quote:
He thought Pocklington might be willing to give him up along with Mike Krushelnyski, whom he(Gretzky) would one day describe as "a moose on skates".
http://books.google.com/books?id=zwa...lnyski&f=false

Quote:
Unlike most of the previous, unsuccessful, would-be accomplices for Gretzky and Kurri, Krushelnyski is an adept puck handler.

And, says coach Glen Sather, with his size and strength not too many players are challenging Krushelnyski in front of the net.

"He looks like he will stay with us," Kurri said of Krushelnyski. "He's big like (Dave) Semenko and he can get in front of the net."

"That creates a lot more room for me and Wayne. And, we can move the puck a lot more now with three guys handling it."
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...helnyski&hl=en

Quote:
Ken Linseman, the Edmonton Oilers' combative, high scoring center, was traded yesterday to the Boston Bruins for smooth skating forward Mike Krushelnyski, a Montreal native.

Linseman said Krushelnyski will offer the Oilers a badly needed high scoring left winger, who could potentially complete the Jari Kurri-Wayne Gretzky line.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...helnyski&hl=en

Quote:
[Pat Burns constructed a makeshift checking line of Mike Krushelnyski between Mark Osborne and xxx to confront the Flyers'...
http://www.google.com/search?q=mike+...w=1280&bih=861

Quote:
...defensive-minded players such as Doug Brown, Bob Errey, Mike Krushelnyski, Bob Rouse and Mike Ramsey...
http://www.google.com/search?q=mike+...w=1280&bih=861

Quote:
Edmonton's checking like of Craig McTavish, Mike Krushelnyski, and xxx combined for 10 points...
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...helnyski&hl=en

Quote:
Free Agent Mike Krushelnyski, a defensive forward who can play either center or left wing...
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...helnyski&hl=en

Quote:
Markwart, Boston's 1st round draft out of Regina last June, and Krushelnyski, a 23 year old center groomed in the minors for 2 seasons after being drafted in the 7th round in 1979, are Bruins prototypes . Few of their shifts are without hits.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...helnyski&hl=en

Quote:
Placed on the left wing on Edmonton Oilers' high-scoring line to add muscle, Krushelnyski, nonetheless, desired to carry his fair share of the offensive load.

"Mike's an unselfish player," said Gretzky. "He sacrifices quite a bit and does a lot of things people don't realize. He'll score 30 or 40 goals. Hopefully 50."
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...helnyski&hl=en

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Old
07-24-2011, 09:53 PM
  #65
Velociraptor
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Eddie Johnston, G

Position: Goaltender
HT/WT: 6'0", 190 lbs
Catches: Left
Nickname(s): "E.J."



- 2-time Stanley Cup Champion (1970, 1972)
- Member of the 1972 Canadian Summit Series team.
- 1 Top-2 in wins.
- 234 wins, 257 losses, 80 ties and 32 shutouts in 592 regular season games played.
- 7 wins, 10 losses and 1 shutout in 44 playoff games played.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
The career of netminder Eddie Johnston straddled the NHL's Original Six and Expansion eras. He also witnessed first hand the transformation of the Boston Bruins from league doormats to Stanley Cup champions. Overall, he played in nearly 600 regular season games and was considered a steady if unspectacular player.

After leading the EPHL in wins and shutouts in 1960-61 and topping the WHL in victories the next year, the Bruins gave him a shot at the big leagues. Johnston received plenty of work in the early stages of his NHL career since Boston continually battled the New York Rangers to stay out of the league's basement. Still, in the days when there were only six full time NHL goalkeepers, it was a major accomplishment for Johnston to suit up for the Bruins regardless of how bad they were. In only his second season, the young backstopper played in all 70 of the Bruins' games, one of the last players of his time to do so. Johnston was also one of the last goalies to adopt a face mask after he was hit by a Bobby Orr shot in pre-game warm up in 1965.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Johnston was on hand as the Bruins built around the likes of Orr, Phil Esposito and Johnny Bucyk to become a league power in the late 1960s. By this time he was playing nearly 40 games a season but was definitely the "number 2" goalie behind Gerry Cheevers. The Bruins won the Stanley Cup in 1970 with Johnson as the second stringer. Two years later he led all post-season netminders with six wins and a 1.86 goals against average as the Bruins won their second title in three seasons. A few months later, Johnston was honoured by being named the spare goaltender for Team Canada in the Summit Series versus the Soviet Union.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chidlovski
A veteran goalie by the time the Summit Series started, Ed Johnston was a solid NHL goaltender. He had an impressive career of 16 seasons with Boston, Toronto, St. Louis and Chicago in the National Hockey League. Johnston is known as the last goaltender to play every minute of a season when he played in all 70 games for the 1963-64 Boston Bruins. His experience and goaltending skills were a nice addition to the talented Team Canada in 1972.

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Old
07-25-2011, 12:30 AM
  #66
TheDevilMadeMe
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Marian Stastny, RW



Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Both Anton and Peter always insisted that Marian was the most talented of them all. A talent that he displayed briefly in the NHL.
...
Marian didn't make his debut in the NHL until he was almost 29-years old and on the downhill of his career, but despite that he managed to score almost a point per game. He had 294 points (121 goals and 173 assists) in 322 regular season games and 22 points in 32 playoff games.
NHL career

- Defected from Czechoslovakia and joined the NHL at the age of 28.

- 24th in scoring with 89 points in 74 games his first NHL season. The only player older than him above him in scoring was 30 year old Marcel Dionne.

- In his second NHL season, he had 79 points in 60 games before suffering a dislocated shoulder he never fully recovered from. He was 9th in points per game that year.

- After his injury:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Marian was a good addition to the Leafs team with his savvy and ability to play on all three forward positions.
Pre-NHL career:

Prior to joining the NHL at the age of 28, Marian a star in Czechoslovakia and was compared favorably to his younger brother Peter:

CSSR overall:
-322 points in 238 Czech league games (Peter had 240 in 198 before defecting at 24 years old).
-41 points in 33 Czech league playoff games.

CSSR Scoring finishes:
-3rd in 74-75 (behind Hlinka, Novy)
-not top 10 in 75-76
-10th in 76-77 (Peter was 8th)
-5th in 77-78 (Peter was 7th)
-1st in 78-79 (outscored 2nd place Vladimir Martinec 74-62)
-79-81: no data?

International:
5 points in 7 games at the 1976 Canada Cup
11 points in 6 games at the 1980 Olympics!
35 points in 40 World Championship games

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Old
07-25-2011, 01:31 AM
  #67
TheDevilMadeMe
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Ulf Dahlen, W



- 301-354-655 points (287-350-637 adjusted points) in 966 games

- Represented Sweden in every best-on-best tournament of his career (1992 Canada Cap, 1996 World Cup, 1998 and 2002 Olympics)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Ulf Dahlen was quietly one of the more intelligent players of his generation. He had a number of good skills but every bit as important he really understood the intricacies of the game.
...
His game was not based on speed. In fact he was an unusual though deceptive skater. In stead he used great balance and core body strength to protect the puck with his body expertly. He was extremely effective down low and in the corners and on the boards. He would then drive to the net or find an open man with a strong pass. In a different era he would have been the perfect fit to compliment the Sedin Twins.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Illustrated
Ulf Dahlen of the Washington Capitals falls into the category of being a dependable two-way veteran forward.
SI's 2002 Olympic Preview

Boardwork:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toronto Sun
I was pulled out of my seat by Crosby's power skating demo, but what impressed me the most was Crosby's ability to keep his balance while controlling the puck and cutting on his edges at high speeds in close quarters.

To me it was mainly due to the fine art of performing the 10 and 2.

The 10 and 2, for those of you who don't know, is the ability to set your feet in time as you skate. The left foot is positioned at the 10 o'clock hour of your pocket watch and your right foot is set at the 2 o'clock hour of your grandfather clock.

Actually , it doesn't matter what kind of clock you use, 10 and 2 is a term that NHL players have used for years to describe a player's footwork.

The 10 and 2 has been around for quite some time. Ulf Dahlen, a big power forward who scored more than 300 goals in 900-plus NHL games, was the pioneer of the 10 and 2. He used to go to it quite often behind the net, but only at about half the speed of Crosby.
-April 17, 2010 http://www.torontosun.com/sports/hoc.../13626366.html (via VanIslander)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sharks fan bio
He was amazing along the boards and almost seemed to skate sideways at times behind the net. A master at controlling the puck Dahlen was able to hold the puck in the zone long enough to set up many goals he never got points for, if only there was a third assist.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fan comment
Ulf was the first Shark player in my mind that made a career out of fighting for the puck on the boards.
http://my.hockeybuzz.com/blog.php?us...7&post_id=3106

Ulf Dahlen Teaches young players how to win board battles:

Quote:
Originally Posted by hockeyplayer.com
When Ulf Dahlen goes into the corner for a loose puck, he always seems to come out with it. Considered one of the top puck-protection men in the league, Dahlen says the main reason for his success is that he is comfortable playing the puck with his skates.
...
Also, going to the corner often means taking a hit, which is something else Dahlen feels he can use to his advantage. After a player throws a hit, it takes him a moment to regroup. Dahlen uses that split second to get better control of the puck or make a pass.
...
Once he’s taken the hit and won the puck with his feet, Dahlen’s next task is either to make a pass or drive to the net.
...
Dahlen says one of the things he always does in the corner is buy time, letting the rest of his team gain the zone and set up. This delaying is even more important on the power play, so he urges players not to feel rushed in the corner.

And again, if a defenseman wants to put the body on you during the power play, it’s to your advantage. A four-on-three is better than a five on four, and if someone leaves the penalty-killing formation to hit you, that’s what you’re left with.

“The perfect thing is to get someone to hit you,” says Dahlen.
http://www.hockeyplayer.com/paid/pub...icle_173.shtml

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Vogel, Capitals Official Site
Dahlen is a marvel to watch as he plies his trade on the ice. He’s big and strong and is one of the best in the league at battling in the corners and along the boards.
...
It’s amazing how much physical punishment Dahlen can take in the high traffic areas without coughing up the puck, going down to the ice or retaliating. He is one of the league’s most gentlemanly players. In nearly 800 NHL games, he has taken only 202 minutes worth of penalties – none this season. On the other hand, he is constantly frustrating opponents into taking penalties. Dahlen and his linemates are capable of cycling the puck for the better part of a shift and tired defenders do desperate things.
http://capitals.nhl.com/club/page.htm?id=42562

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Vogel
During the early part of Halpern’s career, he centered a line that included veteran wingers Steve Konowalchuk and Ulf Dahlen. For a few seasons in the early part of the previous decade, that combination formed one of the league’s top shutdown trios. Halpern and his linemates held the opposition’s top trios in check by forcing them to play in their own end of the rink.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Halpern
I remember Ulf Dahlen [showing me] when a guy is pinning a puck along the boards, how to separate the player from the puck. I think Ulfie was one of the best I’ve seen at that.
http://dumpnchase.com/?p=868

Powerplay net presence:

Ulf was consistently a very good PP scorer for a long time:

- 120 career PP goals (91st All-Time and close to the top among MLD players)

- 11+ PP goals 5 times.

- He was also famous for holding the puck along the boards behind the net, drawing defensemen to him, on the powerplay (see above).


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 07-25-2011 at 02:19 AM.
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Old
07-25-2011, 09:33 AM
  #68
Velociraptor
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Dale McCourt, C

Position: Centre
HT/WT: 5'10", 180 lbs
Shoots: Right
Nickname(s): "Chief"



- 3 Top-10's in shorthanded goals
- 1 Top-10 in Power-Play Goals and Power-Play Goals on Ice for
- Captained the Detroit Red Wings (1979-80)
- Shares all-time point record in one World Junior tournament (18 points in 7 games)
- 194 goals, 478 regular season points in 532 games played.
- 9 goals, 16 playoff points in 21 games played.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Dale McCourt entered the NHL with impressive enough credentials to be dubbed the next NHL superstar. He would never achieve those lofty expectations, but had a productive NHL career followed by a lengthy career in Switzerland.

Born in Falconbridge, Ontario, McCourt was a junior superstar in the OHA. He was a perennial 50 goal scorer who captained the the Hamilton Fincups to the Memorial Cup in 1976. He was also honored as the Stafford Smythe Memorial trophy as Memorial Cup MVP. In 1977McCourt also represented Canada at the 1977 World Junior Championships where he was tournament all-star and helped the nation win a silver medal. That season he was named the Canadian Major Junior player-of-the-year in 1977. He graduated junior as the all time leader in many scoring categories in all of Ontario
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
The struggling Detroit Red Wings opted to select McCourt with the first overall pick at the 1977 Amateur Draft, passing on the highly rated defenseman Barry Beck and a future Hall of Famer Mike Bossy. McCourt stepped in immediately, and playing on a line with Paul Woods and Bill Lochead, he impressed with 33 goals. He was the toast of Detroit after helping the Red Wings return to the Stanley Cup playoffs.

McCourt continued to be a solid point producer for Detroit, upping his scoring totals to 81 and 86 points in the following years, but the team never built on its success enjoyed in 1977-78.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Centre Dale McCourt was expected to be an NHL superstar after an outstanding amateur career. He ended up having a reasonably productive seven-year NHL career and also excelled in Europe. McCourt was a solid point producer for Detroit.

After being the first overall pick at the 1977 Amateur Draft by the Detroit Red Wings, McCourt impressed with 33 goals. His creativity on a line with XXXX XXXXX and XXXX XXXXXXX as well as the power play helped the club reach the playoffs for the first time since 1970.

In 1984-85, he played his first of seven years with Ambri Piotta of Switzerland. Along the way, McCourt topped the 40-goal mark twice and helped the team earn promotion to the Elite Division before retiring in 1991.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toledo Blade
The Detroit Red Wings have selected Dale McCourt of the Hamilton Fincups first overall, he is the top major junior player in Canada this year, and he has been the first selection in the amateur draft. He finished his junior career with a record 477 points on 194 goals and 233 assists.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Evening Independent
McCourt, an outstanding second year player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argus-Press
Dale McCourt who Is also Detroit's leading scorer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Press-Courier
Explosive and efficient are commonly used words to describe Red Wings forwards John Ogrodnick and Dale McCourt, who took five shots between them and scored on all opportunities.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Detroit Red Wings, the illustrated history
Dale McCourt, Detroit's first pick in the 1977 draft, was a remarkably consistent scorer collecting 28, 33, 30 and 30 goals in his first four seasons.


Last edited by Velociraptor: 07-27-2011 at 10:21 AM.
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Old
07-25-2011, 09:22 PM
  #69
Velociraptor
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Orest Kindrachuk, C

Position: Centre
HT/WT: 5'10", 175 lbs
Shoots: Left
Nickname(s): "O"



Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Orest Kindrachuk was one of the more underrated players in the National Hockey League during the 1970's.
- 2-time Stanley Cup Champion (1974, 1975)
- 1 Top-10 in Shorthanded Goals
- 118 goals, 379 regular season points in 508 games played.
- 20 goals, 40 playoff points in 76 games played.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
The Philadelphia Flyers did a little more homework than the rest of the league, and were rewarded when they eventually signed him as a free agent in July, 1971. They were impressed with Orest's stellar junior career with the Saskatoon Blades (WCJHL) where he scored 263 points in 164 games. He led the league in assists (100) his last year there.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orest Kindrachuk
I was playing in the commercial league when I started thinking that I could always go back to school. Chronologically, I would not always be young and in top shape to play hockey so I decided to give it a try. Eventually, the Flyers invited me to their training camp. What is crazy is that if I would have played my draft year I might have been selected fairly high then I may never had the opportunity to play for the Flyers and be on a Stanley Cup-winning team. Things really fell into place for me. Call it destiny.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
By 1973-74 Kindrachuk was given a promotion to the National Hockey League. The timing couldn't have been better, as Orest would spend his first two NHL seasons as a Stanley Cup champion.

Orest played an unspectacular role on the Flyers but was a very important part of their team when they won the Cup in 1974 and 1975. He was not the fastest skater around but he was a tenacious checker who was strong on both ends of the ice. A strong penalty killer, he was mostly a center but occasionally played as a left wing.

His coach in Philadelphia, Fred Shero, liked him a lot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Shero
He was the kind of player you wanted out there in the tough situations because he had both the brains and guts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Kindrachuk's most regular linemates were tough guys Dave "Hammer" Schultz and Don "Big Bird" Saleski.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Orest Kindrachuk
A lot of times when we would go on the road our line would have to play against our opponent’s top line. The three of us were plus players. We could keep up with anybody. We were actually a very good line
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Orest's best season in the NHL came during the 1975-76 season when he had 75 points including 26 goals, this despite playing on the 3rd line. He played some very solid hockey in Philadelphia even though he was bothered by a chronic back ailment for much of his career.

Orest was eventually traded to Pittsburgh together with Tom Bladon and Ross Lonsberry for Pittsburgh's 1st round draft choice in 1978. He was immediately named the Penguins captain in training camp and held that position for his entire stay in Pittsburgh.

He had a very fine first season in Steel City, scoring 60 points. Unfortunately he ran into a hip point injury problem in the 1979-80 season, but still managed to score a respectable 46 points in 52 games.

Orest was definitely one of the unsung heroes of the 1970's who never got the headlines but who always did a very fine job. He scored a total of 379 pts in 508 games as well as 40 points in 76 games.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
A solid playmaking centre who could play defence and kill penalties, Orest Kindrachuk played over 500 games for three different NHL teams. He topped the 30-assist mark five times in his career and was dangerous on the powerplay and while shorthanded.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
As a rookie in 1973-74 he scored 41 points as the third centre behind Bobby Clarke and Rick MacLeish. The youngster was solid in the playoffs and helped the Flyers become the first expansion team to win the Stanley Cup. In 1974-75 he missed 20 games due to an injury but was a solid checker in playoffs as Philly repeated as Stanley Cup champions.

By 1975-76, Kindrachuk assumed a more prominent role. In addition to checking and killing penalties, he provided offence and was used as a playmaker on the power play. He set career highs of 26 goals and 75 points then returned to more of a checking role in next two years. During this period he occupied one of the safest places in hockey as the pivot for tough wingers Don Saleski and Dave Schultz.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor Star, April 10th, 1974
Orest Kindrachuk is not concerned with what professional hockey scouts thought of him three years ago when he graduated from the junior ranks. He's in the National Hockey League now and Philadelphia Flyers are the benefactors. Kindrachuk, known primarily for his checking ability and aggressive play, scored two goals as the Flyers downed the visiting Flames 4-1 in the opener of their best-of-seven quarterfinal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Shero
He has moves and toughness, as long as he plays thus well, no one is going to take his job.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Philadelphia Flyers Encyclopedia
Kindrachuk was a strong part of the "Broad Street Bullies" chemistry. In a situation similar to teammate Don Saleski, he eventually made the welcomed change from a brawler to a penalty killer and he could provide needed offense, too. Kindrachuk's gutsy play earned an assist on Bill Clement's 1975 Stanley Cup insurance goal, and "O" gave the Flyers more offensive depth in 1975-76 as his goal and point totals doubled those of the previous season. The work ethic and attitude of the heroes that provided the fans of the hard-working Philadelphia Flyers with consecutive Stanley Cup Championships will not be forgotten, and Orest Kindrachuk is no exception.


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Old
07-26-2011, 03:38 AM
  #70
Dreakmur
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Bert Marshall

Awards and Achievements:
2 x Stanley Cup Finalist (1966, 1975)

Style of Play:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Bert Marshall was a rugged stay-at-home defenceman who could also provide crisp outlet passes to his forwards. He played nearly 900 games for four different teams in the 1960s and '70s when his consistency was a useful part of the team.

....

The reliable defensive play and leadership provided by Marshall helped the Islanders develop into a competitive squad by the mid-'70s. He was a member of the team when it reached the semi-finals in 1975 and 1976. He helped the younger players like Bryan Trottier, Clark Gillies, and Mike Bossy learn to win and be professional .
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Bert Marshall was no Bobby Orr or Paul Coffey. You didn't see Bert roaring down the ice unleashing 40 foot slapshots past the goalies. He wasn't the type of guy who made any headlines. All he did was to play effective, defensive hockey, blocking shots and being a leader in the dressing room. These were the main reasons why he lasted a total of 950 NHL games including the playoffs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorthanded: The Untold Story of the Seals
Bert Marshall was a hockey player’s hockey player. Perhaps the fans didn’t notice him a lot because he was not flashy. He didn’t make end to end rushes or score a lot of goals. But game in and game out, Marshall did his job: blocking shots and keeping the puck out of his own end.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Bert was a rugged, stay-at-home defenceman who could also provide crisp outlet passes to his forwards.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Arbour
Bert means so, so much to our team from every vantage point. He knows the game in and out and he's the guy every player kinda looks up to. He's alert on and off the ice and he knows how to benefit from every situation that arises.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Howell
Bert made very few mistakes. He was a steady type. He covered for me when I made a mistake.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted Hampson
He was one of the best shot blockers in the game. A defensive defenseman, you could always count on him to get the puck out of our end.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilles Meloches
He was solid in front of you. I think he blocked as many shots as I did.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie Burns
He was a big, strong individual. He had limited skating skills, but he knew what to do with the puck.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wally Boyer
Bert was a funny guy and a good defenseman. He was hard to get around.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Baun
He had pretty good size and mobility and a good attitude.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Featherston
I learned a lot about being in the NHL, as a person, from Bert.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Worthy
Bert was a damn good defenseman; a tough guy with a good sense of humor.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Shmyr
He was a steady defenseman. One-on-one, you couldn’t go around him. He was never caught up ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig Patrick
He was a leader, our captain, and a solid guy for us. He was not gifted offensively, but he knew the game well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walt McKechnie
Bert was a veteran influence on the team and a real competitor. He would be blocking shots like it’s the seventh game of the Cup finals in overtime.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marshall Johnstone
One of the smartest players I have ever played with. He was first-class.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggie Leach
Bert was one of the older guys on the team, and he worked hard. He was one of the best shot-blockers I’ve ever seen. He had marks all over his body from blocking shots. He was very disgusted with us for not coming back to help out defensively.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted McAneeley
He was the most experienced player on the team and a stabilizing guy. He was a good defensive defenseman and the cornerstone and captain of the team.

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Old
07-26-2011, 04:20 AM
  #71
TheDevilMadeMe
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Randy McKay, RW.

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
A scrappy right-winger with ability to score and check,


McKay is a heavyweight fighter at this level and a top notch bodychecker and leader.

But he is also more than good enough to excel at a regular shift - he was Bobby Holik's RW for a number of years, when that was considered the best checking line in the NHL.

His regular season offense isn't that great, but he did score a large number of clutch goals over the years. He actually led the 1995 championship team in playoff goals while playing with the "Crash Line," which was the 4th line of the team on paper.

-163 goals, 201 assists, 363 points, 1731 PIMs in 932 games
-4th in +/- in 1998 with +30

Clutch play:

- Stanley Cup in 1995 (8 goals and 12 points in the playoffs from the 4th line, scored the winning goal in game 6 of the ECF to send the Devils to the finals for the first time)

- Stanley Cup in 2000 (6 assists as the right wing on the Bobby Holik checking line)

- Stanley Cup finalist in 2001 (6 goals and 9 points in 19 games before being injured in the finals)

Defensive Play:

- 10th in Selke voting in 1997-98, while being overshadowed by his (higher scoring) linemate, Bobby Holik

- In the late 90s-early 00s, Bobby Holik and Randy McKay formed 2/3 of the best checking line in hockey. Their LW rotated.

- In the 2001 ECFs, when the Devils stacked the checking line to go against the Mario Lemieux/Jaromir Jagr line (in the end, sweeping the Penguins), McKay stayed on Holik’s RW and John Madden was moved to the LW.

Toughness and leadership:

- Alternate captain of the New Jersey Devils for back to back trips to the finals in 2000 and 2001

- Voted "Player's player" by his teammates for the 1999-2000 season

- 3 Times 200+ PIMs
- 7 Times 140+ PIMs

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey
Beginning in 1991-92, McKay blossomed into a tough grinder on an emerging NHL power. He helped the Devils reach the Eastern Conference Final in 1993-94 and scored eight goals while helping the Devils win the Stanley Cup the next season. McKay continued to keep the club around the top of the NHL standings and recorded a personal best 24 goals in 1998. Two years later, he provided grit and leadership when New Jersey won its second Stanley Cup title. McKay notched 23 goals in 2001 and potted six playoff goals as the Devils narrowly lost the Stanley Cup finals in seven games to the Colorado Avalanche.

After spending parts of eleven seasons in New Jersey, the Dallas Stars who had won the Stanley Cup in 1999, looked to avenge their loss to McKay's Devils in the 2000 Final, acquiring the robust winger in the late stages of the 2001-02 season. The Montreal native went on to play a mere 14 games with the Stars before signing as a free agent with the Montreal Canadiens in the summer of 2002. Although his offensive totals had fallen, McKay's leadership and playoff experience are what the club looked to build on.
Can be a PP net presence if needed:

- scored 8 PP goals in 1998
- scored 12 PP goals in 2001 (tied for 1st on the team), as the net presence on the 2nd unit of the best PP in the league

- McKay's injury crippled the 2nd PP of the Devils in the 2001 finals. Gomez and Mogilny were rendered useless without McKay standing in front of the net for them.

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Old
07-26-2011, 04:43 AM
  #72
Dreakmur
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Tom Bladon

Awards and Achievements:
2 x Stanley Cup Champion (1974, 1975)

2 x NHL All-Star (1977, 1978)

Scoring Accomplishments:
Points among Defensemen – 7th(1973), 9th(1977), 16th(1974), 20th(1976)
Goals among Defensemen – 6th(1973), 8th(1974), 9th(1976), 14th(1977), 16th(1978), 18th(1975)

Play-off Points – 4th(1974), 7th(1976), 8th(1973)
Play-off Goals – 1st(1974)

Peak Years: 1973 to 1978
13th in Points, 60% of 2nd place Brad Park
7th in PP Goals

7th in Play-off Points
5th in Play-off PP Goals

Style of Play:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Tom Bladon was a hard shooting, offensive minded defenseman best known for his days with the Philadelphia Flyers. Nicknamed "Bomber" because of how hard he could shoot the puck, Bladon broke Bobby Orr's record for most points in one game by a defenseman.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Tom Bladon played his junior hockey with the Edmonton Oil Kings of the WCJHL from 1970 to 1972. During that time, the young defender established himself as a solid, offensive threat from the blueline.

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Old
07-26-2011, 05:23 AM
  #73
Dreakmur
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Mike McEwen

Awards and Achievements:
3 x Stanley Cup Champion (1981, 1982, 1983)

NHL All-Star (1980)

Scoring Accomplishments:
Points among Defensemen – 8th(1979), 8th(1980), 16th(1977), 20th(1982)
Goals among Defensemen – 3rd(1979), 5th(1977), 16th(1980)

Play-off Points among Defensemen – 2nd(1979), 4th(1981), 4th(1982)

Peak Years: 1977 to 1982
9th in Points, 66% of 2nd place Borje Salming
10th in Goals, 67% of 2nd place Reed Larson
8th in PP Goals, 72% of 2nd place Brad Park

6th in Play-off Points
4th in Play-off Goals
2nd in Play-off PP Goals

Style of Play:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Mike McEwen was a talented offensive defenceman who played over 700 NHL games in the 1970s and '80s. He was a fine passer with an accurate shot but often clashed with coaches since he was somewhat of a free spirit.

...

... The next year, he was part of the package sent to the Colorado Rockies for star blueliner Barry Beck. McEwen provided an instant upgrade to the club's mobility on defense but he clashed repeatedly with coach Don Cherry who disliked his attitude...

...

... He provided offensive savvy and mobility on the blueline and was part of three straight Stanley Cup wins on Long Island. Through the rest of his career, he was an offensive sparkplug on the L.A. Kings, Washington Capitals , Detroit Red Wings, and Hartford Whalers.

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Old
07-26-2011, 06:04 AM
  #74
Dreakmur
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Olli Jokinen

NHL Awards and Accomplishments:
NHL All-Star (2003)

Florida Panther Captain (2003-2008)

NHL Scoring Accomplishments:
Points – 14th(2007), 15th(2006)
Goals – 11th(2007), 12th(2003), 15th(2006), 16th(2008)

Peak Years: 2003 to 2009
12th in Points, 84% of 2nd place Daniel Alfredsson
7th in Goals, 86% of 2nd place Jarome Iginla

International Awards and Accomplishments:
Olympic Silver Medalist (2006)
Olympic Bronze Medalist (2010)

World Cup Silver Medalist (2004)

2 x World Championship Silver Medalist (1998, 1999)
3 x World Championship Bronze Medalist (2000, 2006, 2008)

International Scoring Achievements:
IIHF Points – 5th(2004), 6th(2006)
IIHF Goals – 1st(2006), 2nd(2004), 8th(1997)

Finnish League Accomplishments:
SM-liiga Play-off MVP (1998)

Style of Play:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hockey News
Is a big presence up the middle and a good face-off man. Has above-average hands and the instincts of a natural goal-scorer. When motivated, he plays a complete game.

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Old
07-26-2011, 06:09 AM
  #75
DaveG
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C/LW Steve Konowalchuk



Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelletier
Steve Konowalchuk was one of those rare elite role players that was impossible for any hockey fan not to admire.

Konowalchuk was equal parts of heart and intelligence. He was a courageous digger and mucker, working hard for every goal and every win, using every ounce energy on every shift. Yet his understanding of the game made him a brilliant player in his own right. He was a defensive genius, a regular on the PK especially when 2 men down.

He was an impact player, knowing when to change the pace of a game with an energy shift or a big hit. Simply put, he was a coach's dream - great character, great work ethic and a complete team player. His offensive game was anything but fancy and his totals never grand, but there was not a coach in the league who would not take Steve Konowalchuk exactly as he was.

Best known as a long time Washington Capital, Konowalchuk finished his career with the Colorado Avalanche. His career ended in a bitter form of irony. This heart and soul player was forced off the ice by doctors after a rare heart disorder named QT syndrome was discovered.

The Salt Lake City-born Konowalchuk totaled 171 goals and 225 assists in 790 NHL games. He also played for the U.S.A in two World Cups and two World Championships.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado GM Pierre Lecroix
"Steve Konowalchuk was a key acquisition for us last season," said Avalanche president and general manager Pierre Lacroix. "Steve played extremely well for us last season, but on top of that he is a true leader and warrior on the ice."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Washington Post, Dec 9th, 2003
[Steve Konowalchuk] is prospering. He has become a vital cog with a first- place club, playing on a top line with stars Joe Sakic and Teemu Selanne.
Statistics:
Regular Season:
790 games played, 171G, 225A, 396PTS, 703PIMs
3rd in short handed goals in 1994-95 season

Playoffs:
52 games played, 9 goals, 12 assists, 21 points, 60PIMs

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