HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > Fantasy Hockey Talk > All Time Draft
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
All Time Draft Fantasy league where players of the past and present meet.

MLD 2011 Bios

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
08-04-2011, 11:22 PM
  #151
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Mark Napier

MARK NAPIER



Napier will provide speed and scoring to our top 6.

From Buffalo Sabres Legends:

Despite still having two years of junior eligibility remaining, he signed as an under-age junior with the WHA Toronto Toro's May 1975. Napier was an instant hit in the WHA, recording 93 points, and was the only rookie to finish among the league's top 50 scorers. He also was voted as the WHA rookie of the year. In his sophomore season Mark exploded for 60 goals, one of only 8 players to do so in WHA history.

Napier was a spectacular skater, blessed with tremendous speed and acceleration. He also had good balance, skating with his legs wide apart forming a low center of gravity. He maintained his fine speed until he was well past 30. Mark thrived on fast-breaks, transition offense and two-on-one situations.

He was drafted from the Birmingham Bulls (WHA) by Montreal Canadiens in the 1st round,10th overall of the 1977 entry draft. The Montreal fans loved his eye-pleasing end-to-end rushes and his streaky goal scoring exploits.

Often paired with fiery Doug Risebrough, Napier led Montreal in goals three consecutive season with 35 tallies in 1980-81 and 40 in back to back seasons in 1982 and 1983. On January 23rd, 1982 he set the team record for fastest two goals from the start of a game, scoring twice in the opening 38 seconds against Calgary.

Mark closed out his solid NHL career in 1988-89, totaling 767 games and 541 points (235 goals and 306 assists). In the WHA he had 254 points in 237 games.

Napier went on to play in Italy between 1989-93 where he continued to rely on his fine speed. He played for Bolzano, Varese and Milano becoming the Italian champ three out of the four years. Mark led the league in goals and points in both 1990 and 91, as well as assists in 1991. In 128 games Mark scored a whopping 376 points.


From Legends of Hockey:

Right-winger Mark Napier was blessed with blinding speed and a natural scoring ability. He accounted for 235 career goals with four different NHL clubs, won two Stanley Cups then excelled in Europe for four seasons.

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 12:21 AM
  #152
chaosrevolver
Snubbed Again
 
chaosrevolver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Ontario
Country: Canada
Posts: 14,268
vCash: 500
LW - Loui Eriksson


Quote:
Originally Posted by TSN
Owns tremendous offensive instincts and a goal-scorer's touch. Should eventually fill out his 6-1 frame. Understands the defensive side of hockey.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIG D Hockey
Eriksson, 25, set a new career high in points (73) and assists (42) this season. He is the only player in the NHL this season to be ranked in the top 200 in scoring and have less than 10 penalty minutes. Eriksson was assessed four minor penalties this season for eight penalty minutes in the 79 games he played this season. The Goteborg, Sweden native ranked tied for 18th in NHL scoring this season with 73 points (25g, 46a) as he has increased his point total each year he has been in the league. Eriksson played in his first NHL All-Star Game as he scored two goals and two assists for four points, including scoring the game-winner for Team Lidstrom in the contest.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loui Eriksson
It is always fun to be recognized for something like this, I don’t really take a lot of penalties when I am out there,” said Eriksson. “I try to play my game when I am on the ice, I am not the guy that usually sits in the penalty box and that is how I have been playing since I started.
Accomplishments
* 1x All-Star (2011)
* 2009-2011 Statistics: 92 Goals, 115 Assists, 207 Points, +20
* National Level Statistics: 13 Games, 6 Goals, 5 Assists, 11 Points
* Top Goal Finishes: 12th (2009)
* Top Assist Finishes: 19th (2011)
* Top Point Finishes: 15th (2011)
* Top-10 Even-Strength Goals: 7th (2009)
* Top-15 Short-Handed Goals: 13th (2010)
* Voted NHL's Most Underrated Player through NHLPA Poll (2011)
* Lady Byng Finalist (2011)

chaosrevolver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 01:12 AM
  #153
seventieslord
Moderator
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 24,750
vCash: 500
Bob Gracie, C/LW



- 5'9", 155 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1932, 1935)
- Stanley Cup Finalists (1933)
- Top-20 in assists twice (3rd, 14th)
- Top-30 in points 3 times (6th, 23rd, 27th)
- 9th in playoff scoring (1932)
- Best percentage scores by seventies system: 80, 63, 62, 50, 45, 42
- AHL Scoring Title (1945)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Forward Bob Gracie played nearly 400 NHL games for six different clubs in the 30s. He was a fine playmaker and scorer who also played responsible defence.

Born in North Bay, Ontario, Gracie began his amateur hockey career in the NOHA with the local Trappers and the Kirkland Lake Lakers. He then moved on to the West Toronto Nationals and the Toronto Marlboros. Late in the 1930-31 season, Gracie impressed with four goals during an eight game NHL trial with the Maple Leafs. The next year he scored 13 goals while playing on a line with Frank Finnigan and Harold Darragh. That spring he scored three post-season markers while helping the franchise win its first Stanley Cup as the Maple Leafs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Bob Gracie was a arrogant, cocky person who rubbed many people the wrong way. That's probably why he moved all over the hockey map in his career. But he was also a talented goal scorer and playmaker. Though his NHL numbers never stood out like they did in the juniors and minors, Gracie was a consistent scoring threat in his day.

Gracie started his career with the Toronto Maples Leafs in 1930-31, but he also played with the Boston Bruins, New York Americans, Montreal Maroons, Montreal Canadiens and Chicago Black Hawks. He also served with several teams in the AHL and PCHL before his career was done by the close of the 1940s.

One hockey story, which may be more legend than fact, has Gracie calling his own goal in a sudden death overtime with the Leafs against the Maroons. Gracie had been sitting on the bench for most of the extra period when Toronto coach Dick Irvin finally dispatched Gracie over the boards with about 3 minutes left in the period. Gracie supposedly skated over to the official scorers bench and said "Get a pencil. Write these words - Goal by Gracie." The scorer smiled but was less than impressed. But sure enough, Gracie took a pass from Andy Blair and fired the winning goal!

In 379 NHL games he scored 82 goals and 191 points. His best season may have come in 1934-35 when he joined the Montreal Maroons. Playing on a line with Herb Cain and Gus Marker, Gracie helped the Maroons win the Stanley Cup.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
In 1937, there was no doubt that Bob Gracie was the fastest skater in the NHL
Quote:
Originally Posted by Border Cities Star, February 1, 1932
The spectacular speed of youthful Bob Gracie and the deadly accuracy of Frank Finnigan featured the Leafs' victory.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, April 4, 1932
BOB GRACIE'S OVERTIME GOAL PUTS TORONTO TEAM IN FINALS - ...overshadowing all else in the Leafs' victory was the performance of Hap Day, sterling defense player, and young Bob Gracie, fast-skating left winger.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, January 13, 1938
Robert Gracie featured the fray by skating so fast his hips were scraping.

seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 01:16 AM
  #154
seventieslord
Moderator
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 24,750
vCash: 500
Pat Boutette, F (mostly RW)



- 5'8", 175 lbs
- 453 points in 756 games
- 24 points in 46 playoff games
- 74 NHL fights
- killed 27% of his teams' penalties
- 7-year ironman streak
- best percentages by seventies method: 61, 53, 46, 38, 34
- best ES percentages: 70, 44, 39, 39, 38, 38, 33, 32

Famous for throwing the check that began the end of Guy Lafleur's reign as a superstar player.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1981
pound for pound, he's as tough as any man in hockey because he backs down from no one... excellent team player, gung-ho type who's a splendid dressing room comedian...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1982
Nicknamed "bash"... rugged RW who can score, check and hit... at his best in the hand-to-hand, jungle warfare combat in front of the net... he plays aggressively... "Pat plays hard every game," says ex-teammate Blaine Stoughton... "he's a good defensive player", says former coach Don Blackburn...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1983
Rivals complain about the feisty, tough LW because of his aggressive style of play and willingness to hit and be hit in the corners... at his best in the rough-going in front of the net... always willing to fight...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1984
never stands pat... loves to hit... even likes being hit... knows how to work in the corners... forte is getting the puck to people who score best... offensive production is a big bonus... tough to keep out of the lineup... hasn't missed a game in seven years...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1985
hard-nosed competitor... loves to hit... not unwilling to menace an opponent with the stick... always involved in play... makes things happen in offensive zone with scrappy, tenacious play
Quote:
Originally Posted by sportscelebs.com
Pat Boutette’s career in hockey was consistently marked by a great mental strength that allowed him to face down the odds that tended to jump onto his path from time to time. Standing only 5' 8" high, Boutette knew that he'd have to become a durable mucker who would never back down from anyone, no matter how much bigger his rivals stood. In 1975-76, he got the call to join the Leafs on a line with Dave "Tiger" Williams and Jack Valiquette. Short-guy jokes abounded in the dressing room as Boutette grew in his resolve to work hard and play aggressively against foes of all sizes. It was not uncommon to see him drop the gloves against such leviathans as the Isles' Clark Gillies or the Flyers' Don Saleski. He also managed to find the opposition's net with respectable third-line frequency. Into his fifth season with the Leafs, Boutette was traded to the Hartford Whalers where, despite his short stay, he scored a personal-best 80 points in 80 games for the struggling Whalers. In 1981, he was dispatched to the Pittsburgh Penguins, where he continued to play his aggressive game in the company of **** ******* and Rick Kehoe. The only difference between life as a Pen and as a Leaf was that, in Pittsburgh, he tended to score more while making life difficult for opponents along the boards.
Quote:
Originally Posted by hockeydraftcentral.com
Played in 611 consecutive games from 1975-76 season to 1983-84 season. Streak was fifth-longest in NHL history when it ended on Oct. 30, 1983
strangely, the streak was not recognized in the NHL's official guide and record book. in 1988, the 5th-longest streak is 580 games, skipping over Boutette's mark.


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-05-2011 at 02:04 AM.
seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 01:24 AM
  #155
seventieslord
Moderator
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 24,750
vCash: 500
John Mayasich, C/D



- 6'1, 190 lbs

- Charter Member of the IIHF Hall Of Fame
- Member of the USA HHOF

- Olympic Gold (1960) - was USA's captain
- Olympic Silver (1956)
- World Championship Bronze (1962)

- 4th in scoring in 1960 Olympics with 12 points
- Led USA with 10 points in the 1956 Olympics (6th in tournament)
- Named Top Defender at World Championships (1962)
- 27-17-44 in 46 games in Seven Pool A, Senior Men's Major International Tournaments from 1956-1969

- Led Midwest Collegiate Hockey League in scoring four straight seasons (1952, 1953, 1954, 1955)
- Leadership: Playing Coach of the Green Bay Bobcats from 1962-1971

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spitfire11
Scored 144 goal and 298 points in just 111 games for the NCAA University of Minnesota, 2.6 points per game, and 1.3 goals per game and still holds all Minnesota's scoring records. He also led Eveleth High School to four straight Minnesota high school championships from 1948-1951, never losing a single high school game in four years, 10 of his records still stand.
Quote:
Originally Posted by VintageMinnesotaHockey
Mayasich is regarded by many as one of the best American born Ice Hockey players of all-time even though he never played professionally. Mayasich won the Western Collegiate Hockey Association scoring title in 1954 and 1955 and was an All-American three years in a row at his university. Mayasich's #8 is the only retired number today by the Historic Minnesota Golden Gophers hockey program. Mayasich was inducted into the United States Hockey Hall of Fame in 1976
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Mariucci
John (Mayasich) brought college hockey to a new plateau. He was the Wayne Gretzky of his time. And today if he were playing pro hockey, he would simply be a bigger, stronger, back-checking Gretzky
Quote:
Originally Posted by The First Miracle On Ice
Opponents simply had no way to shut him down. His moves were too crafty, his shots too hard. Mayasich had his own unique calling card -- a wicked slap shot that would have been the envy of any NHLer except Bobby Hull.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack McCartan
For my money, John Mayasich was the best American hockey player that I've ever seen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reading Eagle, January 29, 1956 (Olympics)
Mayasich, a former University of Minnesota athlete, was the standout player for the Americans, playing a brilliant all-around game and back-checking powerfully.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Spokesman – Review, February 1, 1956 (Olympics)
the two big architects of the gigantic hockey reversal were John Mayasich, a four-time All-American from Minnesota who scored three times…
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Day, March 17, 1958 (College)
although he is playing, John Mayasich, the top defenseman from Eveleth, Minnesota, has a bad shoulder. Almost every time he made contact at last night's contest, he winced. But he went all the way and the coach says Mayasich would be in action again tonight.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Christian Science Monitor, March 25, 1960 (Olympics)
and Mayasich, who played a wonderful defensive game throughout the Olympics… (Snippet of pay article )
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hartford Courant, March 9, 1961 (World Championships)
Mayasich Leads Yanks Again – it was big John Mayasich of Green Bay, who led the Yanks. Playing the whole game, the US national team veteran rushed and… (Snippet of pay article)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Milwaukee Journal, January 9, 1962 (USHL)
Green Bay has been bolstered by the return of John Mayasich, playing coach who serves either at center or defense
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tri-City Herald, March 21, 1969 (USHL)
John Mayasich, the Americans 35-year-old coach from Green Bay, played a stout game on defense

seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 01:26 AM
  #156
seventieslord
Moderator
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 24,750
vCash: 500
Gary Sargent, D



- 5'10, 210 lbs
- 9th in Norris Voting and 12th in All-Star Voting in 1978
- Named to NHL All-Star Game in 1980, unable to play
- Played in 1976 Canada Cup and was 2nd in team MVP voting
- Averaged 25.11 min/GP in his career
- Placed 5th, 7th, 4th in the NHL in icetime in his three best seasons (7th, 9th, 2nd ES)
- Placed 4th, 1st, 1st, 1st, 3rd on his team's defense corps in ice time in his 5 "full" seasons (4th, 2nd, 1st, 1st, 4th ES)
- heavily used on special teams (63% PP, 38% PK)
- major contributior to PPs that ran at 106% of the average and PKs that ran at 93% of the average (meaning good)
- Career Adjusted +70 despite major minutes
- Career was ultimately derailed by injuries

Quote:
Originally Posted by hockeydraftcentral
Is full-blooded Ojibwa (Chippewa) Indian, who was born on a reservation... Sargent played out his option in Los Angeles and signed with Minnesota as a restricted free agent on June 30, 1978. Los Angeles received Rick Hampton, Steve Jensen and Dave Gardner as compensation. Minnesota had signed Sargent before it agreed on compensation with Los Angeles. The Kings wanted Gilles Meloche in the compensation package, but an arbitrator ruled that Minnesota's offer of Hampton, Jensen and Gardner was sufficient... Set Los Angeles records (since broken) for single-season points (54), goals (14) and assists (40) in 1976-77. ... Was on ice for 53.1 percent of Minnesota's goals in 1978-79 (best percentage in NHL that season). ... Named to 1980 NHL All-Star Game, but was unable to play due to back injury. ... Missed part of 1979-80 season with slipped disc in back, an injury suffered in February 1980. ... Missed part of 1980-81 season with lower back injury, suffered in December 1980. ... Missed remainder of 1980-81 season after undergoing spinal fusion surgery at the Mayo Clinic on March 16, 1981. ... Struggled to come back from surgery in 1981-82 and was forced to sit out many games with back pain. ... Missed remainder of 1981-82 season with back spasms, suffered in January 1982. ... Missed most of 1982-83 season with knee injury suffered in November 1982 and re-injured in March 1983.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1979
Will make the backline even tougher... a fine offensive player... possesses a quick, hard shot from the point and has good speed... on defense, he loves to hit, is strong and works well in front of his net.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1980
Excellent before being slowed by back problems... signed by North Stars as part of a campaign to collect the best Minnesota-born players... When healthy, he's a robust hitter and a skillful offensive threat...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1981
The player the North Stars missed the most last season... team's best all-around defenseman... two-way defenseman who generates attack and defends well... strong, sturdy... one of the league's most mobile defensemen... outstanding on powerplay... everyone calls him Sarge.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1982
If spinal fusion surgery has corrected his woes, he will be a huge boost.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Times, January 23, 1976
rookie Gary Sargent made several excellent defensive plays that prevented unmolested shots on their goaltenders
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Times, February 19, 1976
Gary Sargent a rookie defenseman rapidly growing up in the NHL (snippet of pay article)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Times, September 19, 1976
Defenseman Gary Sargent proved he can play in topflight competition after drawing the second highest vote as Team USA MVP
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Times, October 8, 1976
A King who stood out was Gary Sargent. There wasnt anyone playing harder... (snippet of pay article)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, December 20, 1976
...the best check being one thrown at Lafleur by Gary Sargent...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago Tribune, December 23, 1977
(photo caption) Hawks Bob Kelly takes jolting check from Kings Gary Sargent
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Press, January 7, 1978
The Kings best defenseman Gary Sargent
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Press, January 12, 1978
"Our two pointmen, Marcel Dionne and Gary Sargent, are both strong puck-carriers," Murphy said. "They don't get knocked off the puck too often. That's the biggest thing in a powerplay - getting the puck to the blueline."
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Times, November 12, 1978
Gary Sargent said he was offered more money by the Kings during his free agency negotiations but opted for playing in Minnesota, where he was born and... (snippet of pay article)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boston Globe, January 6, 1980
Defenseman Gary Sargent of the North Stars has been playing "conservative" hockey this season because, he says, "I don't want to get caught in deep..." (snippet of pay article)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boston Globe, January 13, 1981
I know they were missing their best defenseman by far Gary Sargent ..He wasnt playing and that's a key man out of their lineup... (snippet of pay article)
But can't any decent defenseman average 25 minutes per game in a short career?

- Barry Beck, an ATD player, averaged 25.07 minutes in a 615-game career
- Brad Maxwell, an ATD player, averaged 23.33 minutes in his best 400-game segment
- Jerry Korab, an ATD player, averaged 27.42 minutes in his best 5-year segment and 22.17 in his career
- Dave Burrows, an ATD player, averaged 25.18 minutes in his best 5-year segment and 23.72 in his career
- Phil Russell, an ATD player, averaged 26.11 minutes in his best 5-year segment and 23.94 in his career
- Behn Wilson, an ATD player, averaged 22.94 minutes in his best 5-year segment and 22.67 in a 601-game career
- Bob Dailey, an ATD player, averaged 25.25 minutes in his best 5-year segment and 24.49 in his 561-game career
- Very few MLD defensemen ever played 25+ minutes in a season, let alone averaged that much in their career

For five years, Gary Sargent was in the league of these players, all his contemporaries. He just didn't play as long.

The knock on Sargent? Really, it's that he played just 402 NHL games and was injury-prone.


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-06-2011 at 12:54 AM.
seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 01:43 AM
  #157
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Dave Hutchison

DAVE HUTCHISON



Dave Hutchison will provide an intimidating, physical, defensive force.

From Los Angeles Kings Legends:

Dave Hutchison was a rugged and reliable defenceman throughout his 12-year professional hockey career. In 584 regular season games, he totaled 116 points and 1,550 penalty minutes. He was a role player, an aggressive stay-at-home defenceman who was often paired with an offensive minded defenceman. In fact he was the defensive conscience of two of the top defensemen of his time: Borje Salming and Doug Wilson.

Hutchison played for the Kings for four seasons. "Hutchy" loved life as a bachelor on the warm beaches of California. But it was also in Los Angeles that he learned to become an effective NHL defenseman. He would thank coach Bob Pulford for making him into an NHL caliber rearguard, teaching him how to maximize his abilities by realizing and playing within his limits.

But those who did not follow Hutchinson closely knew him strictly as a tough guy defenseman. He dropped his gloves frequently, and with devastating results. Unlike a lot of tough guys, he thoroughly enjoyed fighting, taking great pride in his battles.

Of course, fighting meant a lot of bumps and bruises, too. That only served to further enhance his quickly earned his tough as nails reputation. For example, he once played 6 weeks of the 1975-76 season with his jaw wired shut.

With the Hawks, Hutchison recorded a personal-best 23 points in 1981-82, the same year that Doug Wilson captured the Norris Trophy. Dave played a large role in Wilson's success. There was no way Wilson could have scored 39 goals that year had he not had a steady partner to cover his defensive position, thus giving Wilson the green light to run and gun.

From Legends of Hockey:

In 1972, the Los Angeles Kings and the WHA's Philadelphia Blazers drafted him. He opted to join the Blazers for a season and then headed West with the team's new incarnation in Vancouver. By the time he made his NHL debut with the Kings in 1974, Hutchison had established himself as a role player who played an aggressive style of stay-at-home defense. He credits coach Bob Pulford for his longevity by stressing the importance of playing within his means and to never hold the puck longer than a second and a half.

In 1980, he was traded to his favorite club as a child, the Chicago Blackhawks. During his two-plus seasons with the team, he was the defensive foundation upon which his partner, Doug Wilson, could afford to jump up into the offensive play. Wilson won the Norris Trophy in 1982, and Hutchison went on stage with him when the award was given out.

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 01:53 AM
  #158
seventieslord
Moderator
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 24,750
vCash: 500
Charles Tobin, F/D



(photo is really not available - believe me, I looked hard.)

Tobin has the versatility and talent to be a 2nd line scoring winger, a checking winger or a defenseman.

- 5'10", 160 lbs.
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1916, 1920, 1922)
- PCHA 1st All-Star Team (1918)
- played about 40% of his games at RW, 22% on defence, 17% at LW and 15% at C
- Played for 10 seasons in the PCHA at age 27-36
- spent 7 seasons bouncing around prairie leagues before that, 67 pts in 32 games
- 2nd in Alberta Pro scoring behind Fred Whitcroft (1908)
- Played for 5 PCHA teams, scoring 101 goals and 30 assists in 174 games
- 3rd, 5th 6th, 8th, 8th 10th in PCHA goals
- 7th, 9th in PCHA assists
- 3rd, 8th, 8th, 9th in PCHA points
- Portland Rosebuds all-time Games, Goals, Points leader
- Best percentage seasons by the seventies method: 88, 65, 46, 45, 43
- Scored 4 of Prince Albert's 6 goals in two-game 1910 Stanley Cup pre-challenge

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Trail Of the Stanley Cup, Vol. 1
Charles Tobin played ten years in the PCHA, during which time he was with five teams, missing only Spokane. Three times he was with a champion in a Stanley Cup series but never on a winner.

He was like Fred Taylor in one respect in that during his first three years he played quite a bit of defense with Ernie Johnson for New Westminster and Portland, alternating at rover. he had his three best years at Portland playing (at RW) on a line with Tom Dunderdale and Fred Harris.

Tobin was a fine stickhandler and was chosen All-Star LW of the PCHA in 1918.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Toronto World, November 26, 1912
Charley Tobin, Former Winnipeg star, will play with Vancouver this year.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sun, November 23, 1914
Portland will have a forward line this season that will keep the other teams hustling. McDonald, Oatman and Tobin are three speed fiends that have developed a combination that will take some beating.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sun, February 27, 1915
Tobin was the best man on the ice for Portland and worked hard, but the visitors did not seem to be in working order last night...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toronto World, March 26, 1919
Ernie Johnson did not play his usual game and was soon replaced by Barber. Barber moved to the centre position and Tobin dropped back on the defense.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Morning Leader, November 21, 1921
Charley Tobin, after several years of the most earnest kind of service in these parts, has been released.


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-08-2011 at 12:42 PM.
seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 10:17 AM
  #159
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Dan Maloney

DAN MALONEY



Maloney is a highly respected competitor who leaves it all on the ice. He will be our emotional leader while providing an aggressive forecheck, policing, boardwork, tenacity and some offense.

CHL First All-Star Team (1972)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1976)

From Toronto Maple Leaf Legends:

This Irishman may have been quiet and soft-spoken off the ice but on the ice he was anything but. Dan Maloney was a charismatic leader who always stuck up for his teammates. As a result he was he was always popular in the dressing room wherever he played.

The Chicago Black Hawks liked Dan's rugged play and claimed him in the 1970 amateur draft (1st choice,14th overall). Dan quickly established himself as one of the leagues premier pugilists. He won some memorable fights as a rookie, but he also contributed offensively. Over the years Dan fought the toughest players and won many of his fights, even though a serious shoulder injury slowed him down a bit in later years. He was never afraid to drop 'em. His fearless attitude was his greatest ally in the NHL trenches.

Dan's stint in LA lasted little over two years. He had a career high 66 points (27goals and 39 assists) in 1974-75. Bob Pulford, the coach behind the Kings bench, considered Dan to be one of his key players. But when owner Jack Kent Cooke signed free agent Marcel Dionne from Detroit, Dan and defenseman Terry Harper were shipped to Michigan as compensation in 1975.

"Losing Maloney was a big blow to what we were trying to accomplish in LA. He was our leader, a much respected player," Pulford said.

In his first season with the Red Wings Dan equaled his career high 66 points In Detroit he quickly became GM Ted Lindsay's favorite player and became the team captain. Lindsay, who himself was one of the toughest players of his era, appreciated Dan's similar style of play.

Not only Dan was excited to land in Toronto, Leafs GM Jim Gregory said. " A big need on our team was a tough, aggressive left winger and no one filled the bill better than Maloney."

Coach Roger Neilson said "With Dan, Tiger Williams and Pat Boutette on our team, left wing is probably our toughest position, physically."

Bruins coach Don Cherry, a noted expert on hockey's tough guys, was envious.

"At the time the trade was made, I said that it was a good one for the Leafs. They picked up a good, tough, experienced winger who fitted right in with what the team was trying to do."

Dan was certainly no speed demon on his skates, but he worked very hard to improve his skating. He lacked the natural scorer's touch around the net and had to work hard for everything he accomplished. His strength wasn't only his right and left fists but also his overall work ethic and leadership qualities. Dan was a really good cornerman and stood his ground around the enemy net.



From Legends of Hockey:

If there was ever a player who molded his career on a strong work ethic and tenacity, it was Dan Maloney, who always gave the proverbial 110 per cent.

At the age of 17, lanky Dan Maloney played Junior B hockey with the Markham Waxers, where he was one of the team's best two-way players, and always showed an interest in the fisticuffs if need be. At 18, he moved on to major junior, suiting up for the London Knights in 1968-69. The following year Maloney received much more ice time and was gaining lots of attention from NHL scouts, who liked his ability to generate offense while at the same time showing a willingness to take care of the tough stuff, as evidenced by his 232 minutes in the penalty box.

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 10:53 AM
  #160
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
PATRIK SUNDSTROM



Patrik provides stellar two-way, and will pivot our offensively geared but defensively responsible third line.

588 Points in 679 career games
WJC-A All-Star Team (1981)
WJC-A - Best Forward (1981)
Swedish World All-Star Team (1982)
Swedish Player of the Year (1982)

From Vancouver Canucks Legends:

Like Daniel and Henrik Sedin, Patrik and Peter Sundstrom were different players. Like Peter, Patrik was an excellent skater, combining deadly speed with excellent balance. Also like Peter, he was a tremendous puckhandler who preferred to pass than shoot, almost to a fault. Also like Peter, Patrik was a strong two way player who worked hard without the puck as well as with it.

Patrik was better than Peter in a number of areas which resulted in the general consensus that Patrik was the better of the two. Patrik was 20lbs heavier than Peter, much of it muscle. While neither player initiated much contact, Patrik's increased size made him harder to knock the puck off of. Combined with his excellent balance, this made Patrik a threat in traffic. Patrik was also more willing to sacrifice his body. A good shot blocker, Patrik regularly took a big hit to make a play, something that Peter generally shied away from. Another major difference between the two was Patrik's shot. While Peter's shot was below average at best, Patrik owned a lazer like wrist shot which he used with great accuracy. However like many Swedish stars of the 1980s, Sundstrom didn't shoot anywhere near enough despite the opportunities he got.

Patrik's elite international experience helped ease his transition to the Canucks lineup in 1982. Fresh off of the surprising Stanley Cup Finals run, the Canucks hoped Sundstrom could upgrade their talent level that was necessary to keep competing against Smythe Division rivals like Edmonton and Calgary. While Sundstrom did do just that and became arguably the Canucks best player for much of the 1980s, the Canucks failed to achieve much success in his tenure.

Sundstrom scored 23 goals and 46 points in his rookie season, and backed that up with a 38 goal, 91 point campaign in 1983-84. The 91 points set a Canucks club record for most points in a season that stood until Pavel Bure's spectacular seasons in nearly a decade later.

Sundstrom may have over achieved a bit that season, as he levelled off to the 70 point level for most of the rest of his career. He spent the next three seasons in Vancouver before the arrival of Pat Quinn in the summer of 1987. Though Quinn liked what Sundstrom brought to the table, he liked what the New Jersey Devils brought to the table even more. The Devils were very interested in the two way slick Swede. Quinn jumped at the deal.

However it was a deal that benefitted both teams as the Devils were very happy with Sundstrom's effect on their organization as well. Sundstrom played 4 full seasons in New Jersey before retiring in an injury plauged 5th season.

Sundstrom was a consistent scoring threat, particularly in 1988-89 when he scored 28 goals and 69 points, and in 1989-90 when he scored 27 goals and 76 points. However perhaps his biggest effect was on his linemates Brendan Shanahan and John MacLean. Those two rugged wingers were blessed with a nose for the net and were expected to blossom into power forwards. However it wasn't until his arrival that the two finally achieved their status as stars. To me that is a huge testament of Patrik Sundstrom's ability and importance to the team.

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 11:01 AM
  #161
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Scott Young

SCOTT YOUNG



Scott will be a big part of our strong two-way third line and a member of our special teams.

757 Points in 1181 Games

From Legends of Hockey:

An international hockey veteran, Young represented the United States on several front including; the World Junior championships (1985-1987), the World Championships (1987 and 1994), the Winter Olympics (1988, 1992 and 2002), and the World Cup (1996).

A quick skater who developed into an excellent forechecker with a hard, accurate shot. Starring as a defenceman at Boston University, Young earned Hockey East First Team All-Star honours in 1986 and had previously earned First Team All-Star honours at the 1987 World Junior Hockey Championships.

From International Hockey Legends:

When looking back at Scott Young's statistics, the one thing that surprised me is how often he moved around the NHL. I thought he was a fantastic support player, which is probably what made him so desirable by other teams. They were willing to pay a nice price in hoping Young would breakout with his new team.

I also remember Young as a very important member of Team USA in the late 1980s and through the 1990s as well as the 2002 Olympics. Born in Clinton, Massachusetts, he always answered the bell when his country needed him, playing in three world juniors, three Olympics, three world championships, the 1996 World Cup of Hockey and two stints with the US national team regular season.

I remember being intrigued by Young at the 1986 draft. He was an all star defenseman at Boston University, but also utilized as a swing man who would play forward, most notably at the World Juniors. He played right wing for most of his NHL career, probably because of his average size, but I always have considered the rare players who could excel both at forward and on defense to be the most intelligent and valuable players in hockey.

I remember someone on Hockey Night In Canada once referred to Scott Young as a "hockey machine." It was a pretty good quote. He excelled in so many facets of the game.

Young had a very heavy slap shot, which caught more than a few goalies by surprise. He liked to tee up one timers near the top of the right face off circle, and was often used on the right point on the power play.

He definitely had a shooter's mentality, firing away whenever possible, and darted in front of the net for rebounds and loose pucks. But what he wasn't was a finisher. He had a career year in St. Louis in 2000-01 with 40 goals, otherwise he was a 20 goal, 50 point threat.

Raised as a defenseman, it comes as no surprise that Young was a diligent defensive forward. He read plays well, had good anticipation and an active stick, as well as the speed and quickness to get to pucks first. He was a regular on the PK unit as well as the PP unit. He was not a physical player by any stretch, which limited him a bit in the true checker's role.

He was a reliable performer game in and game out, and in the playoffs. With his speed, shot and ability to read plays he played a long time, 1181 games in total plus 141 more in the playoffs. He scored 342 goals and 756 points in the regular season, plus 44 goals and 87 points in the Stanley Cup post-season.


TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 11:12 AM
  #162
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Colin Patterson

COLIN PATTERSON



Colin is arguably one of the best defensive forwards in the draft. He will be used on the PK whenever possible, and matched against forwards who need a shadow.

From Legends of Hockey:

Over the next ten years, he established himself as a defensive specialist, skating, for the most part, alongside Doug Risebrough and Richard Kromm. Patterson rarely strayed from his defensive role, one he fell into with ease, having learned the skill during his days as a lacrosse player.

From Calgary Flames Legends:

During the mid to late 1980s the Calgary Flames were an NHL super power. One of the most unheralded yet most valuable players from those teams was Colin Patterson.

Patterson combined speed and anticipation to establish himself as one of the NHL's best defensive forwards. A tremendous forechecker who would sacrifice his body without thought, Patterson was a hard worker and dedicated athlete. He was also a character in the locker room, always cracking jokes to keep the team loose.

Patterson was a key figure on the Flames roster for the next four seasons and especially during the 1988-89 campaign. He established a career-high 24 assists and totaled 38 points during the regular season that year and was a solid performer for the club in the postseason. In 22 playoff games in 1989, he totaled 13 points and helped the Flames to their first Stanley Cup championship.

His kamikaze style of play finally caught up to him by 1989. His knee was so banged up he had to have reconstructive knee surgery in the summer. That surgery cost him the entire 1989-90 season.


Thanks to TheDevilMadeMe for his previous bio:

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
London selects an excellent defensive specialist with a winning pedigree who can play both wings, Colin Patterson, W

-6'2", 195 lbs (good reach)

Selke record: 12th (1987), 3rd* (1989). He also received 1 vote in 1990.

*In 1988-89, Patterson was actually tied with Esa Tikkanen for 2nd in Selke points but lost the tie break for 2nd on 1st place votes. Guy Carbonneau (arguably the best defensive center ever) was first.

That season, the Calgary Flames scored 67 goals and only allowed 23 whiile Patterson was on the ice (Source = pnep).

That season, the Flames had the best PK in the NHL, and Patterson was their leading PKing forward with 4.22 SH minutes per game, slightly more than ATD mainstay Joel Otto (Source = pnep).

-Stanley Cup in 1989 (13 points in 22 playoff games)
-His teams (Calgary and Buffalo) made the playoffs in all 9 seasons of his career, advancing to the 2nd round on 5 occasions and to the finals twice.

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 11:31 AM
  #163
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Pelle Lindbergh

Pelle Lindbergh



Lindbergh will man our goal with Cechmanek.

Named Best Goaltender at EJC-A (1976, 1977)
WJC-A All-Star Team (1979)
Named Best Goaltender at WJC-A (1979)
Swedish World All-Star Team (1979, 1980, 1983)
AHL First All-Star Team (1981)
Harry "Hap" Holmes Memorial Award (fewest goals against - AHL) (1981) (shared with Robbie Moore)
Dudley "Red" Garrett Memorial Award (Rookie of the Year - AHL) (1981)
Les Cunningham Award (MVP - AHL) (1981)
NHL All-Rookie Team (1983)
NHL First All-Star Team (1985)
Vezina Trophy (1985)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (1983, 1985)

From Legends of Hockey:

The peak of Lindbergh's career came on June 13, 1985, when he was awarded the Vezina Trophy. He was the first foreign goaltender to receive the award, which is the highest honor bestowed on a goalie by the NHL. Everything pointed to an outstanding career for Lindbergh. He signed a six-year contract with the Flyers and all doors were open to him. A month after receiving the Vezina Trophy, he bought himself the Porsche he had always wanted and was happier than he'd ever been. But, tragically, he hit a concrete wall while driving his car in New Jersey. Reports said there was alcohol in the 27-year-old goaltender's blood.

From Philadelphia Flyers Legends:

Lindbergh quickly erased any doubts the following season. Lindbergh shone in training camp and stole back the starting role. He would play in a league leading 65 games and led all goalies with 40 wins, accumulating only 17 losses with 7 ties and 3.02 GAA. Even more importantly, he was even better in the playoffs where he played all in playoffs games, going 12-6 while posting an incredible 2.50 GAA and a playoff leading 3 shutouts. Lindbergh's incredible playoff run was cut short by the powerful Edmonton Oilers, as they would go on to defeat the Flyers in the 1985 Stanley Cup Final. At the end of the year, Lindbergh was given the Vezina Trophy as the league's top goaltender.

Lindbergh would get off to another quick start the following season, going 6-2 in 8 games, quickly proving the season before was no fluke. However, tragedy would then strike. On November 10, 1985 Lindbergh crashed his sports car into a wall, and he died on impact.


TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 11:40 AM
  #164
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Roman Cechmanek

ROMAN CECHMANEK



Cechmanek will man our goal with Pelle Lindbergh

From BleachReport:

Career statistics: Regular season (NHL): 212 GP, 110-64-28, 2.08 GAA, .919 S %, 25 SO; Playoffs: 23 GP, 9-14, 2.33 GAA, .909 S %, Jennings Trophy (2002-03), All-Star (2001)

... He immediately thrust himself into the starting role with the Flyers, playing 59 games as a rookie and posting a record of 35-15-6, with a ridiculous 2.01 GAA and .921 save percentage, with ten shutouts. He was not eligible for the Calder Trophy due to age limits but it would be ranked as one of the better first years of all-time.

Cechmanek had three amazing regular seasons with the Flyers, but his best was 2002-03, when he had a record of 33-15-10 in 58 games with a 1.83 GAA, .925 save percentage and six shutouts. The Flyers would go on to beat the Toronto Maple Leafs in seven games, but fell to the Ottawa Senators in the second round in six games.

From Legends of Hockey:

Roman Cechmanek was born in Gottwaldov, Czechoslovakia on March 2, 1971. Tall and slender, 'Chemo' starred with Vsetin of the Czech Elite League for five seasons, winning championships in each of those five campaigns. Cechmanek also played on three Czech world championship teams and was part of the 1998 Olympic gold-medal winning Czech Republic team.

Cechmanek was the third selection of the Philadelphia Flyers in the 2000 NHL Entry Draft, and joined the Flyers in 2000-01 as a 29-year old rookie. It was quite a debut season -- second in the NHL with 10 shutouts, second in the NHL with a 2.01 goals against average, fourth in the NHL in save percentage (92.1%). Cechmanek went on to appear in the annual All-Star Game, was selected to the NHL's Second All-Star Team at the end of the 2000-01 season and was a finalist for the Vezina Trophy as the NHL's best goaltender. That season was no fluke -- both in 2001-02 and 2002-03, Cechmanek finished second in goals-against average and near the top of the league in save percentage and wins, while capturing the William Jennings Award in 2003.

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 11:46 AM
  #165
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Pierre Bouchard

PIERRE BOUCHARD



Pierre will be a spare defensive defensemen.

Five Time Stanley Cup Champion

From Legends of Hockey:

But Bouchard played his own determined brand of hockey. He put in two seasons with the Montreal Junior Canadiens from 1966 to 1968. He then turned pro in the Habs' chain, first with the Cleveland Barons and then with the Montreal Voyageurs, both of the AHL. In 1970-71, however, the Canadiens launched themselves on a rethreading project after having missed the playoffs the year before. A number of new and young faces were brought on board, including Bouchard's.

Over his first four years with the club, his ice-time was somewhat limited. With Robinson, Lapointe and Savard garnering the lion's share of action, Bouchard became a member of "the other two" which was made up of himself and Bill Nyrop.

But after sharpening his game over time, Bouchard began to get more and more ice time. And although he was the team's policeman, he preferred to play it clean, handling the rough stuff only when it came knocking at his door. Otherwise, he earned his bread and butter as a rugged, stay-at-home defender in the mold of his father.

From Montreal Canadiens Legends:

Pierre Bouchard, much like a chip off the old block, was a big, stay at home defensemen who was a key part to the Montreal teams of the Disco Decade, though his style of play didn't earn him the accolades from the fans and media that so many others received. The ultimate team player, Pierre's coaches and teammates all appreciated his sacrificial contributions.

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 11:56 AM
  #166
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Ted Graham

TED GRAHAM

Ted was a star defensive defensemen in the 20's and 30's. He will serve as Mark Streit's defensive conscience.

Recieved All-Star votes in 30/31, 32/33 (7th place both years)

From Legends of Hockey:

Defenceman Ted Graham played over 300 NHL games for six different franchises in the 20s and 30s. He was a reliable player in his own end and passed the puck to his forwards efficiently.

From Ice Hockey Wiki:

He played for his hometown Owen Sound Greys when they won their first Memorial Cup as Canadian junior champions in 1924.

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 12:18 PM
  #167
seventieslord
Moderator
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 24,750
vCash: 500
Tony Gingras, RW



- Size Unknown
- Stanley Cup (1901, 1902)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1899, 1900)
- 8 goals in 12 career Stanley Cup games (Bain had 10 in 11 games)
- 25 goals, 26 assists, 51 points, 52 PIM in 37 MNWHA games (senior only)

Dan Bain was getting all the goals but Gingras appears to have been his playmaker and maybe the tough guy of the line, too. In 27 MNWHA games, Bain had 65 goals and just 17 assists and 3 PIM.

Quote:
Originally Posted by http://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?hl=en&sl=fr&u=http://www.scribd.com/doc/27843461/Tony-Gingras-Hockey&prev=/search%3Fq%3Dtony%2Bgingras%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff %26client%3Dfirefox-a%26hs%3DPen%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official%26prmd%3Divo&rurl=translate.google.com &twu=1&usg=ALkJrhgN2q0a6K1i7hR7kWtk1OO_UAiC8Q
Tony Gingras, who was a right wing, was a top scorer for the Winnipeg Victorias. In 1901, the Vics won the Stanley Cup and the national championship against the Montreal Shamrocks in a best of three series. He was also with the Victorias when they won the cup in 1902 by defeating the Toronto Wellingtons.

Gingras was an exceedingly agile player. The enthusiasm generated by this French-speaking Metis is believed to have led to the creation of the Montreal Canadiens. He was also credited with an innovative new hockey stick of a much more modern design.

According to newspapers of the time, who truly worshiped him because he was endowed with an extraordinary skill, a force Herculean and phenomenal flexibility.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Stanley's Cup
(1901) Tony Gingras had been the unequivocal star the previous year in defeat, receiving a floral bouquet prior to game three in respect of his great stickhandling skills. His great rushes set up four of Winnipeg's six goals, though leagues didn't officially count assists.

(1902) Again the outstanding player of the challenge from the Toronto Wellingtons, Tony Gingras, "The Flying Frenchman", skated faster and longer than anyone else on the ice. He scored two game-winning goals in the Montreal AAA challenge.
Quote:
Originally Posted by http://books.google.com/books?id=uffvaENL9HsC&pg=PA72&dq=tony+gingras&hl=e n&ei=kRS2TMm2NYT6lweszO3sBQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct =result&resnum=4&ved=0CDYQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=tony% 20gingras&f=false
Canadian hockey evolved from those sports. It was first developed in Nova Scotia in the 19th century, and was played in Montreal and Ottawa in 1875 and 1880. The immigrants to Canada who moved West in the late 19th century took the popular game along with them, and it was being played in Winnipeg and Victoria by 1890. Given the multicultural roots of hockey, it is not surprising that one of Canada's greatest players at the turn of the 20th century was a Métis from St. Boniface, Antoine "Tony" Gingras.
Quote:
Pushing hard for the tying goal, Winnipeg's Tony Gingras elbowed his way past Montreal's Bob MacDougall...
Quote:
Gingras was a star on the Winnipeg team that challenged for Stanley Cups in the late 1800's and early 1900's, winning the Cup in 1901. Though Dan Bain is a name somewhat well-known to history buffs, Gingras has been long forgotten it seems. But the fiery rover was in all likelihood just as valuable to those Winnipeg teams as Bain was. He was known as one of the games greatest stickhandlers, and scored seven (8) goals in 16 (12) Stanley Cup games.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
GHL's MVP - Tony Gingras

1901-02 - Montreal AAA - The Winnipeg Victorias, described as "rugged westerners," lost the Stanley Cup to Montreal in 1902, but not to the Shamrocks. The AAA, nicknamed the Winged Wheelers, won 2 games to 1. Interestingly, game 2, played on a Saturday night, had to be halted as midnight was struck. Hockey was not yet the official religion of Quebec, so the game was stopped to observe the day of rest.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daily Mail and Empire, February 16, 1899
...got the puck and was making a run for the Winnipeg goal when he got Gingras' stick on the nose, temporarily disabling him.

Bain and Gingras were the stars of the Winnipeg team, and their playing was without a doubt the most brilliant that has ever been seen here. Gingras was rather tricky, and the referee had to warn him several times in the first half for attempting to trip his opponents.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, February 5, 1903
There was another attack from Boon's run, but Gingras cross checked Marshall off of his feet...

Gingras has dropped back to cover... there was a Montreal rush, which Gingras stopped and then went up the side with the puck...

the fifth game was marked by an exchange of personalities between Gingras and Phillips... a feature of the game at this stage was the duel between Phillips and Gingras, both showing staying powers, and a stock of tricks...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor Daily Star, December 29, 1936
Tony Gingras, of Stanley Cup fame 35 years ago, would like to see any modern hockey team play just one game of secen-man hockey with no substitutions. the boys nowadays couldn't stand the pace, he thinks.

The sturdy French-Canadian played in Stanley Cup competition for six years as the right winger for Winnipeg Victorias. He was even a "colorful" performer in 1888... "condition was everything in my day... back in 1903 when Vics challenged The Little Iron Men - we played steadily for 150 minutes before the police put us off the ice Sunday morning. I believe it stands as the longest senior game on record in Canada... If we had seven-man play today there would be less free skating and more 'hockey', less one-man rushing, with players having to work combinations more. Stopping inside blue lines wasn't done 35 years ago. We had to move all the time or we lost possession."

Gingras isn't fond of the six-man game. he has seen the best teams playing and "I don't think any of them, pro or amateur, would beat our Vics of 1901 or 1902."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, April 28, 1937
One of the most colorful hockey players of Winnipeg puck history... an outstanding right-winger...


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-06-2011 at 04:54 AM.
seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 12:24 PM
  #168
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Brendan Morrison

BRENDAN MORRISON



Morrison is a versatile forward who has proven capable of playing anywhere in the line-up. He tends to find chemistry easily with his linemates, and provides solid play in both ends of the rink.

590 points in 895 games, +91

CCHA Rookie of the Year (1994) CCHA First All-Star Team (1995, 1996, 1997) NCAA West First All-American Team (1995, 1996, 1997) CCHA Player of the Year (1996, 1997) NCAA Championship All-Tournament Team (1996) NCAA Championship Tournament MVP (1996) Hobey Baker Memorial Award (Top U.S. Collegiate Player) (1997) AHL All-Rookie Team (1998)

From Legends of Hockey:

An important two-way player with the Canucks, Morrison's speed and anticipation landed him significant time on both specialty units. Since his arrival in Vancouver, Morrison has been one of the team's more durable and consistent players, establishing career highs in goals (25), assists (46) and points (71) during the 2002-03 season.

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 12:37 PM
  #169
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Scott Hartnell

SCOTT HARTNELL



Hartnell will provide a solid forecheck, boardwork, physical play and scoring for our 4th line.

407 points in 761 Games, +40, 1143 PIM

From The Predators Report:

Has deceptive speed and is quick to the puck...Works very well along the boards and in the corners...Has good passing skills and works hard to set up his linemates...A creative playmaker...Has a solid shot and is dangerous around the net...Excels in a physical game...A very aggressive forechecker who has a strong physical presence on the ice...A very determined player who can intimidate opponents with his work ethic and physical play...A good team player and excellent leader.

From The Bleacher Report:

Scott Hartnell has shown to be a clutch guy at times. He has scored big playoff goals when the team desperately needed it. On top of that, he occasionally drops the gloves when needed.

While Scott Hartnell is not the most skilled player he definitely has the grit and experience the Philadelphia Flyers need.

Hartnell is quick to defend any teammate.

From CSN Philly:

he has been the prototypical power forward on the current roster.


TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 12:51 PM
  #170
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Mark Streit

MARK STREIT



Streit will anchor our powerplay and provide offense from the back end.

214 Points in 361 NHL games
42 Points in 85 international (WC / OLY) games
3rd in scoring among defensemen (2008)
Led the Islanders in scoring with 56 points, becoming only the second defenseman to lead his team in scoring since the lockout. (2009)
Played in NHL All-Star Game (2009)

From Legends of Hockey:

Mark Streit was born December 11, 1977 in Englisberg, Switzerland. The 9th round, 262nd overall selection of the Montreal Canadiens in the 2004 NHL Entry Draft, Streit honed his skills in his homeland before making his North American debut in 1999-00.
An solid defenseman, Streit split his first season in North America between the Springfield of the AHL, Utah of the IHL and Talahassee of the ECHL. A five-time member of Switzerland's World Championship team (2000-2004) and a member of its Olympic team in 2002, Streit opted to return to his homeland after only one season in North America. Over the course of the next five seasons Streit suited up for Zurich of the Swiss Elite League before returning to North America in 2005-06 as a member of the Montreal Canadiens.

As a member of the Canadiens, Streit became a regular on thee club's blue line through the 2005-06 season. He set career highs in the 2006-07 season only to have them beat the following season. His most offensively productive season came in 2007-08 when Streit finished tied for second in power play scoring among NHL defenceman. In the 2008 off-season however, the New York Islanders signed the free-agent defenceman to a 5-year contract.

In February 2006, Streit represented his homeland for the second time at the Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy and later that spring made his sixth appearance at the World Championships in Latvia.

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 01:05 PM
  #171
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Coach Dave Tippett

Coach Dave Tippett



Tippett employs a tight defensive system that allows players to maximize their strengths while minimizing their weaknesses. Tippett's teams tend to perform better than the sum of their parts.

IHL Coach of the Year 1999
Jack Adams Award 2010
Regular Season Point Percentage of 62%, 3rd best all time (600+ games coached)

From the Phoenix Coyotes website:

Tippett guided the Coyotes to a record of 50-25-7 for 107 points, shattering the franchise records for wins and points in a single season while qualifying for the Stanley Cup Playoffs for the first time since 2002, finishing with the third-most points in the Western Conference. The successful season culminated in Tippett being honored with the Jack Adams Award as the NHL’s Coach of the Year.

Under Tippett’s leadership, the Coyotes allowed the fewest goals in the Western Conference (202), ranked 6th in the NHL in penalty kill percentage (84.5%), set a new franchise record with a 10-game home winning streak from Nov. 21 to Dec. 29, and tied the franchise record with a nine-game winning streak from Mar. 4-21.

Prior to joining the Coyotes, the 49-year-old Tippet spent six seasons as head coach of the Dallas Stars, from 2002-03 to 2008-09, posting a record of 271-156-65. Under Tippett’s leadership, the Stars won two Pacific Division titles (2002-03 and 2005-06), made the playoffs in five out of six seasons and advanced to the 2008 Western Conference Finals. Tippett’s 271 career regular season coaching victories rank 2nd all-time in Stars history.

During Tippett’s tenure in Dallas, the Stars finished in the top-10 in goal-scoring three times and finished no worse than sixth in the NHL in goals against in five of his six seasons, including ranking in the top three on three occasions (2006-07, 2003-04 and 2002-03).

In 2002-03, his first season as an NHL head coach, Tippett led the Stars to the best record in the Western Conference and second-best record in the league while also guiding Dallas to its sixth Division title in seven seasons. With a record of 46-17-15-4 for 111 points, Tippett posted what was then the fourth-highest point total by a rookie coach in NHL history.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Shane Doan
"To me, he's the best (coach) out there," the Coyotes' Shane Doan said. "It's not even close."

"You know how some guys are known as player's coaches, and players think they can do anything they want? You can't win like that," Doan said. "Then there are the disciplinarians that nobody wants to play for.

"Tip has the perfect balance. He's fair and honest. He holds everybody accountable, but everybody thinks he's on our side."

"Last year, we were struggling, and a bunch of the veterans got together to hash some things out," Doan said. "Tip had a team meeting later that day and nailed every single thing we had said in our private meeting. He saw the same things we saw. I walked out of the room, found (equipment manager) Stan Wilson and said, 'All our faith in this guy is justified.' "

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 01:07 PM
  #172
tony d
The Future
 
tony d's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Behind A Tree
Country: Canada
Posts: 36,548
vCash: 500
Time for another bio, this time I'll do a bio of my #1 goalie, Dan Bouchard. A pick that has been lauded among many people here in this draft. As I said it was between Bouchard and Mclean for me as my #1 goalie going into this draft.



Bouchard has the following accolades:

- Career Record of 286-232-113
- 30th All-Time in Career Wins in the NHL
- 27th All-Time in the NHL in Shutouts with 58

Here's what Legends of Hockey has to say about him:

Quote:
member of the Sorel Black Hawks in 1968-69, Dan Bouchard guided his team to the 1969 Memorial Cup tournament before playing one season with the London Knights of the OHA-Jr league. After a two-year stint in the AHL where he was an AHL First Team All-Star with the Boston Braves and a one game stint in the CHL with the Oklahoma City Blazers, Bouchard was claimed by the fledgling Atlanta Flames where, after enduring the growth pains of expansion, he consistently won more games than he lost, year in and year out.

Bouchard credits his longevity, which consisted of 14 NHL seasons, to some useful advice given by Frank Mahovlich. In Bouchard's first-ever NHL start, the Big M popped a slapper past the rookie netminder and while cruising past the net said, "One of many, kid. One of many!" Thanks to Big Frank, Bouchard learned to live with conceding goals while coveting victories.

By 1981, Bouchard was traded to the Quebec Nordiques where he savoured many more wins in the company of a talent-laden squad that set new battle lines across the province of Quebec. The Montreal Canadiens had a serious rival on their hands and Dan Bouchard was there to glove most of the bullets.

Bouchard concluded his NHL career in 1986 with the Winnipeg Jets. From there, he played for three weeks in Switzerland before a serious knee injury put him on the shelf for good. After packing away his pads, Bouchard served as a goaltending coach for the Nordiques.
Here's what Joe Pelletier's greatest Hockey Legends has to say about him:

Quote:
Patrick Roy's brilliance in nets, especially while with the Montreal Canadiens, established himself as the hero of a generation Quebecois goaltenders.

But did you ever wonder who served as Patrick Roy's idol?

The answer would be Dan Bouchard, a fiery goaltender out of Val d'Or, Quebec best remembered for playing with the Atlanta Flames and later the Quebec Nordiques. Interestingly Roy's first ever NHL shutout came with Bouchard playing at the other end of the ice.

From an early age Dan Bouchard wanted to be a professional hockey player, just like his father. George Bouchard played defense in the American Hockey League, most notably with the Cleveland Barons and Eddie Shore's Springfield Indians. He quit in 1960 and returned to Quebec to raise his family. George would take a job laboring at a brewery for the next 25 years.

The elder Bouchard always kept hockey close to him. In fact he died while playing a recreational game. He passed on his love of hockey to his family. Dan and brother Guy would both make it to the pros as goaltenders, although only Dan would enjoy a NHL career.

Dan first caught NHL attention as a junior. In 1968-69 he captured the Jacques Plante trophy for lowest GAA while leading the QMJHL's Sorel Black Hawks to a Memorial Cup experience. He would switch to London of the Ontario League the following year before being drafted by the Boston Bruins drafted him 27th overall in 1970.

The next two years Bouchard spent apprenticing in the minor leagues. The Bruins were deep in nets with the likes of Gerry Cheevers and Eddie Johnstone, so they allowed Bouchard proper time to hone his craft. But Bouchard was in a hurry, and set the league on its head while leading the league in wins and shutouts and leading the Boston Braves to a regular season title in 1971-72.

Bouchard would never get a chance to play in Boston. The NHL expanded and in the summer of 1972 the Atlanta Flames were quick to select the hot goalie prospect in the 1972 NHL Expansion Draft. He would go on to become synonymous with Atlanta hockey, and one of their key players.

Bouchard very well may have been the most important player in the short history of the Atlanta Flames. With his effective butterfly stance he was able to post very respectable numbers during the regular season, including a league best 32 wins in 1978-79, but the team was never able to garner any post season success. That fact probably will forever separate Dan Bouchard from the other elite goalies of his era. He holds practically every significant goaltender record in Atlanta Flames history.

Though he was and still remains a fan favorite in Atlanta, he was not always a favorite of his teammates and coaches. He was very fiery, very argumentative and admittedly too cocky. He quickly gained a reputation as a troublemaker and a poor leader. He never warmed himself to the media either, often ducking interviews. In many ways Bouchard was his own worst enemy.

Through it all, even the franchise's relocation to Calgary, Dan Bouchard remained the Flames goalie. That changed soon after the team's arrival in Alberta. He was playing less frequently and he was frustrated with what he called communication problems with the team. As the team left on a two week road trip, Bouchard was left behind and told to wait for a trade.

That wait may have been the best thing that ever happened to Dan Bouchard. Even though he was spiraling into a deep depression, he quickly found his salvation in the bible. He had always attended church as a kid, in the same way many of us did - reluctantly. But now he was actually reading the scriptures and suddenly finding inner piece.

This turn around was all rather quick in happening. Before the Flames' returned from their road trip Bouchard began practicing with a Calgary area junior team. Soon enough he found he was traded to the Quebec Nordiques.

From 1981 through 1985 Dan Bouchard was the Nords top goaltender. Again, playoff success was not to be found, and his numbers ballooned like most goalies in the high scoring 1980s. But armed with a new found inner peace, Bouchard enjoyed his time in Quebec.

The Nordiques brought in young Mario Gosselin in 1985, pushing Bouchard back to the sidelines. He would play another year in the NHL with Winnipeg before a short stint in Switzerland in 1986-87. He would retire and relocate back to Georgia.

Nowadays Dan Bouchard, along with former Bruins star Cam Neely, has invested into a credit card processing business. He also remains very active in hockey, teaching hockey to kids in Atlanta.
Really glad I got him to be my #1 goalie.

__________________
tony d is online now   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 01:15 PM
  #173
TheJudge
Registered User
 
TheJudge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Country: Canada
Posts: 790
vCash: 500
Coach Floyd Smith

Assistant Coach Floyd Smith

Regular Season Points Percentage 62.6%
Guided the Sabres to 1st, 2nd, 2nd in the Adams (74-77)

From Sabre's Legends:

Under new coach Floyd Smith, who was the Sabres' Captain during their first year in the league, the 1974-75 Sabres were one of the best teams in the NHL. They won the Adams Division for the first time in history, finishing the season with 49 wins, 16 losses and 15 ties, still the best record in franchise history.

TheJudge is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 01:18 PM
  #174
seventieslord
Moderator
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 24,750
vCash: 500
Jack Portland, D



- 6'2", 200 lbs (tallest player in the NHL at the time, size updated due to first hand reports below)
- Stanley Cup (1939)
- Placed 5th, 7th, 8th in All-Star voting (3-11 voting points)
- Twice 10th in defense scoring

Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: the Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
Portland was as talented an athlete as existed in Canada. He competed in the 193
2 Olympics in high jump; he was also accomplished at javelin and boxing… Teamed with Eddie Shore on the Bruins, the two formed a fearsome line of defense… his long stride and broad shoulders cut an imposing swath across the ice lanes”.
Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
He was a key performer, providing a solid defensive foundation for the Bruins as they won a Stanley Cup in 1939
Quote:
Originally Posted by ourhistory.canadiens.com
Anchoring the Montreal blue line for the next three seasons, Portland’s leadership, steady play and rugged physical approach to his on-ice responsibilities were an asset to the team and set an example for young defensemen Ken Reardon and Butch Bouchard as they moved up the ladder and matured into star performers.

As the 1942-43 NHL campaign wound down, the 31-year-old joined the Canadian Army and saw combat action in Europe while the team he had helped through a rebuilding process captured Stanley Cup titles in 1944 and 1946.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor Daily Star, November 23, 1936
Charlie Conacher got three of the seven penalties that made the first period a rough and tumble affair, and two of them came from his clashes with 210-pound Jack Portland. Portland and Conacher started a feud early in the game and jostled eachother all evening.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Daily Herald, December 1, 1936
Bruins have been undefeated in five starts, and Hooley Smith and Jack Portland, husky backliner, have borne the brunt of the defensive duties. Smith attributes much of this recent success to the great work of Portland and Ray Getliffe... "There is no doubt in my mind, but that Portland will be the outstanding defenseman in the league before another season rolls around. He has all the makings of a topnotcher and right now you only have to tell him a few things in the heat of a game... Portland and Getliffe are two reasons why we are close now and will be when the Stanley Cup is being handed out."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meriden Record, March 29, 1939
The scrap started when Phil Watson, Ranger center, and Jack Portland, heavyweight Boston defenseman, roughed eachother up at the boards.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, November 20, 1940
After a half-dozen years, John Frederick Portland, burly and hard-hitting defenseman, comes back to the team he started with in the NHL... the six-foot, four-inch, 220-pound rearguard had been bought outright by the Habitants... he played with the Canadiens in 1933... turned pro a shade too soon... as a raw and awkward rookie, and found little favour with local fans...tremendously tall, well-built youngster... somewhat awkward on his skates, but had the makings of a hockey player, given time and patience... the Boston Bruins, in search of defensive strength, made overtures to purchase Portland... Leo Dandurand said, "There is a young man who will be a pretty fair defenseman in this league some day. It's too bad we can't keep him. Somebody else will have him when he's good."... played Briefly with Boston and then was sent to the Boston Cubs, there, he benefited by the seasoning he needed and began to improve quickly. At the end of the season he was selected as left defense on the Can-Am All-Star team... Jack then played alongside Eddie Shore and the practical tuition he received from the mighty Bruin defense star completed his development... never a prolific scorer, the huge Portland is noted as a punishing checker, who can rough up his rivals. His strength and size give him a tremendous advantage in the clinches near the nets and along the boards fighting for the puck. He is expected to provide the Canadien defense with some of the power and heavy-belting qualities it has lacked...Portland departed from here as a green kid, full of promise and he returns with that promise long since fulfilled. Jack is a full-fledged veteran, well-proven in the most rugged going, but still only 28... his mammoth presence and shattering body checks ought to make things a little more comfortable for (goaltender) from now on...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Herald, November 26, 1940
Their defense bolstered by the acquisition of big Jack Portland, Canadiens have been getting stronger and making it tougher every game for the opposition forwards.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, December 30, 1940
Then in the third minute of the third frame, the huge Mr. Portland came barging down center. He walked through the Americans' defensemen, brushing them aside, and pausing only momentarily as they hit him and bounced off him as they had been doing all night. Then he caught up with the puck that had gotten ahead of him and flipped it goalwards. Adams came out of nowhere like a streak on a crossover play and stabbed Portland's pass into the lower left hand corner of the net.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leader-Post, October 29, 1941
Note to forwards opposing the Canadiens' defense. Jack Portland is down to 209 pounds and Coach Dick Irvin claims he is still losing weight. But Irvin hastens to add that the "man mountain" is at his best playing weight when hovering around 200.
Interesting note about his athleticism and also more proof that his actual weight in the NHL was in the 200-pound range:

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Day, July 28, 1943
If anyone is curious about what happens to high jumpers when they pass 30 and exceed 200 pounds, we give you the case of Jack Portland, the former Boston defenseman... Jack, now a private in the Canadian army, managed to clear 5'5", which most of us should do, to emerge the winner in last week's military track meet... Back in 1932 Portland jumped 6'2" for the Canadian team in the Los Angeles Olympics... but then he was a 175-pound stripling.


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-06-2011 at 03:17 AM.
seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
08-05-2011, 04:04 PM
  #175
seventieslord
Moderator
 
seventieslord's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Regina, SK
Country: Canada
Posts: 24,750
vCash: 500
Rudolph "Bingo" Kampman, D



- 5'10", 187 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1942)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1939, 1940)
- 3-time Allan Cup Finalist (1936, 1937, 1943)
- PCHL All-Star (1949)
- Placed 5th, 7th, 9th in All-Star voting (2-12 voting points)
- Placed 6th, 14th in scoring by defensemen
- Left NHL due to WW2

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
He already had three seasons of Senior hockey to his credit when he made the leap to the NHL and the Toronto Maple Leafs. Kampman played 32 games as a rookie and was able to score a goal and added two assists in that time. The following year he upped his games played to a career-high 41 and managed to scored a couple of goals and 10 points. His third season, the 1939-40 campaign, saw him hit career bests in goals, assists and points with six goals, nine assists and fifteen points. He was unable to build on his success however, and the next year his production slipped to just five points. Though he got his point total back up to 11 points the following year it was what was accomplished in the post-season that was more important. Kampman chipped in two assists in 13 playoff games while helping the Maple Leafs win the Stanley Cup. It proved to be a fitting finale to his NHL career as he would not play at that level again following his Cup triumph.

The next three seasons Kampman spent playing Senior hockey on Canada's east coast before being traded by the Maple Leafs by the Boston Bruins prior to the 1945-46 season. The Bruins traded "Bingo" back to Toronto just a week later and they assigned him to the Providence Reds of the American Hockey League. After spending the rest of that season and all of the next two in the AHL, Kampman moved on to the Pacific Coast Hockey League in 1948, where he was named an All-Star for his 20 point effort with the Fresno Falcons.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fischler's Hockey Encyclopedia
Not many NHL defensemen were better nicknamed than Rudolph Kampman, who played for the Toronto Maple Leafs... When Kampman bodychecked an opponent, a "bingo" resounded off the rafters; and for good reason. Kampman was built along the generous dimensions of a Clydesdale stallion...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
When Rudolph Kampman broke into the NHL, he immediately caught the attention of observers due to his unique stick abilities. He was ambidextrous.

“One of the most unusual of our present day stick wielders in the NHL is “Bingo” Kampman. He’s distinctly a two-handed performer, who wields his stick either from the left side or the right with equal effectiveness. One minute you cast your eye over the Toronto defense and over Kampman, and you find him playing right-handed. Suddenly there is a shift of the opposing attack to his left. Presto! Bango Bingo is playing left-handed,” once wrote the editor of the Toronto Star.

Kampman was a hard rock defenseman with Toronto in the 1940s, not afraid to throw big body checks or exchange pleasantries with NHL's toughest fighters. His penchant for the physical game apparently earned him his famous nickname.

Kampman was as strong as an ox. Sometimes the on-ice Hercules even used his strength for his benefit away from the rink. More than once Kampman engaged in parlor tricks, winning bar room bets with his teammates by lifting tables high off of the ground with nothing more than his teeth!

Kampman was a bit like a modern day Ed Jovanovski, although Kampman was not nearly as gifted in the skating department. Still, he liked to rush the puck out of his zone, rumbling through each zone in burly although sometimes aimless fashion. He didn't score all that often, as his 14 tallies in 189 career games suggests, but his rushes were described as exciting and memorable.

Dit Clapper, the great Boston Bruin, certainly remembered one rush in particular. As Kampman entered the zone Clapper engaged him along the wall in a routine play. The two fell to the ice. Kampman got up, but Clapper was left lying on the ice in a pool of his own blood. Kampman's skate accidentally sliced Clapper's achillies tendon.

Kampman helped the Leafs with the Stanley Cup in 1942, but that would be the last he would play with them. He was enlisted in Canada's military efforts in World War II, serving in Ottawa and Nova Scotia while continuing to play senior hockey.

Upon his discharge Kampman, like so many Leafs of the early 40s, found his old roster spot taken by a younger player. Kampman continued to play on in various minor and senior leagues until 1950.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskatoon Star-Phoenix, April 7, 1937
Here are pictured two big reasons for the Tigers' sensational showing in senior hockey. Rudolph "Bingo" Kampman, left, hard hitting defenseman, is a player of wide renown.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leader-Post, October 22, 1938
Conny Smythe, manager of Toronto's Maple Leafs, waxed enthusiastic about Rudolph (Bingo) Kampman, former Kitchener defenseman who came up to the NHL last Christmas after a sojourn in the IAHL. "Bingo is the most improved player in such a short space of time that I've ever seen. He's checking better, he's hitting harder and he's not afraid of anything."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Youngstown Vindicator, November 27, 1938
...which might have been a sufficient night's activity except that Bingo Kampman of Toronto spilled Ebbie Goodfellow. They came up with fists bared and were joined by...
Apparently he had another nickname:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Daily Herald, December 30, 1938
Good news came when Bingo Kampman, rushing rearguard, was pronounced fit to play here Saturday... "Dutch the Clutch" suffered a severe leg gash in a game here a month ago.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Herald, April 12, 1939
Ambidextrous stickhandling has almost disappeared from the hockey rinks, but Bingo Kampman of Toronto still changes over to meet a situation.
Great playoff quote!:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor Daily Star, April 17, 1939
Bingo Kampman's ankle, injured when Toronto defeated Detroit in the semifinals, was so sore he could be used rarely outside of power plays... Kampman, hobbling as best he could, drove home the only Toronto score.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newark Sunday Call, March 10, 1940
Both teams joined in the fight and Bingo Kampman, Toronto defenseman, picked up Joe Cooper and threw him over the boards.
Kampman had a part in starting the Leafs off to a playoff victory and sparking what was called the greatest brawl in history: http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...=kampman&hl=en

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor Daily Star, March 29, 1940
GREATEST BRAWL IN HISTORY - the game was less than two minutes old when Bingo Kampman crashed Cecil Dillon into the boards with such force that he was rendered hors de compat with a badly twisted knee. Kampman was just back in action when *** fired the shot that started the Leafs on their way to victory.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmonton Journal, October 17, 1940
Bingo Kampman and Bucko McDonald make quite a pair. There's only one thing they would rather do, next to eating, and that is bash down opposing forwards from their defense posts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Gazette, January 24, 1941
Stanowski and Bingo Kampman did the best bodychecking for Toronto, working a particularly effective sandwich.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spokesman-Review, January 25, 1941
You can fine-comb the league and you won't find two more punishing huskies than Hamilton and Kampman.
Yeah, Grosso scored, but still...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, April 6, 1942
The smooth-working Detroit center picked himself up from a terrific bodycheck dealt by Bingo Kampman, found the puck on his stick and blasted it high into the net.
Kampman had both the willingness and the ability to play in the NHL after the 1942 season, but the war called:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Herald, November 27, 1942
KAMPMAN HOMESICK FOR NATIONAL LEAGUE - Bingo Kampman, the former Toronto Maple Leafs defense bruiser, now an army transport driver in the Halifax area, is nostalgic for the big time. Asked by Ken Chisholm how it felt to be out of hockey, Kampman replied: "Not so good. I can't even listen to those games Saturday. No foolin', it gets me down."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen, March 27, 1943
Kampman was like a young colt when he hit the ice for the pre-game warmup. Might be added he also hit a few of the (RCAF) Flyers once they started to play.


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-06-2011 at 04:58 AM.
seventieslord is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:22 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. ©2014 All Rights Reserved.