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Old
08-05-2011, 05:18 PM
  #176
seventieslord
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Dick Todd, Coach



- Stanley Cup as assistant coach with NYR (1994)
- NYR assistant for 5 seasons
- .647 winning percentage in 938 games of Junior Hockey (1980-2006)
- never posted a win% under .551
- 5-time OHL Finalist, 3-time Champion
- 3-time Memorial Cup Participant, one-time finalist
- 1988 OHL Coach of the Year

Todd fits in well as Cook's assistant as he provides more depth of experience, as well as contribution to winning at the NHL level, something Cook never did. He was a believer in conditioning, which is good because Cook would have a tendency to be too much of a "player's coach". Todd was a guy who would take the time to smooth over players' concerns, though, as well as extra practice or video analysis.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor Star, December 17, 1982
Peterborough Petes coach Dick Todd credits some off-ice conditioning prograps for his team's success in the 3rd period of many OHL games this season... Todd said the players sometimes complain about the extra off-ice work, but they know it's for their own good. "We use four lines which is a big help to us and we concentrate heavily on weight training twice a week", says Todd, who was the team's trainer before being named coach. "Research has proven that hockey players lose strength during the season. They work hard at gaining bulk during the offseason but lose it when they start playing. We actually do it just to maintain the strength they had at the start of the season."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor Star, December 2, 1985
Peterborough coach Dick Todd, who has piloted the Petes to a 19-6-2 record, said his team has been playing great hockey on the road all season. "I think there's only one bad game we've played on the road all year. Our GAA on the road is at 2.00. I think I could say this year we have played just as well on the road as we have at home." Tony Zappia, the Royals' interim coach, credited the Petes. "Peterborough is in first place and the last two nights they've shown us why. they execute very, very well. They don't miss any assignments and they have by far the best defense in the league."
The last part is interesting because Todd didn't have any player in his lineup who is drafted yet. Two might be drafted much later (career #3-6 NHL defensemen) and one never will be (career #7/AHLer) - for them to have had the best defense in the league, they had to be very well-coached.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Times, November 29, 1995
Despite the controversy and his lack of playing time in the third period and the overtime, Robitaille was one of the players who didn't take part in today's optional skate. He watched some tapes with the assistant coaches, Dick Todd and Mike Murphy."We had a good talk this morning," Robitaille said.
Another example of Todd easily diffusing a potential dressing room problem:

Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Daily News, February 2, 1996
Campbell didn't believe the injury was serious. However, ********** dreads missing any more time and wondering whether he has a place in the Rangers' plans. "I said to (assistant coach) Dick (Todd) one day at practice, 'Dick, why can't I play?' " ********** said. "Dick said, 'I only want to say one thing: We need you.' And I said, OK, I go back to work."
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Daily News, May 14, 1996
Mark Messier: "I have nothing but positive things to say about not only Soupy, but also (assistant coaches) Dick Todd and Mike Murphy. They were always incredibly positive with the guys and well prepared. And I thought it was great."
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Daily News, May 1, 1997
Often, wisely, one of the first Rangers off the ice at the end of practices during the regular season, Messier wasn't into conserving energy. Rather, with assistant coach Dick Todd feeding him pucks out of the corner, Messier stuck around for some extra shooting practice.
same player he placated earlier on:

Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Daily News, May 26, 1997
But ********** didn't just come back he scored the Rangers' first goal and assisted on the second in the 4-2 loss to the Philadelphia Flyers that ended their season in five games in the Eastern Conference final.
"I thought he responded and played a very hard game," Rangers assistant coach Dick Todd said of **********, who returned Saturday from Moscow after attending his mother's funeral. "I thought he fought his way through the mental part of it, as well as being off the ice five days without skating. He played a commendable game."
An example of Todd's duties as an assistant:

Quote:
Originally Posted by New York Times, January 10th, 1998
After ********* *********** left the game in the second period, the Rangers were left with only five defensemen for the three two-man tandems that usually rotate. This meant the coaches, particularly the assistant Dick Todd, had to juggle the pairings.
Quote:
Originally Posted by slam.canoe.ca, January 20, 2005
Todd's record sits at 499-252-58-4 and he'll be the quickest to reach 500 wins in Canadian Hockey League history.
He is eighth on the all-time CHL list, but his winning percentage is the best.
The impact Todd had in his OHL return:

Quote:
Originally Posted by slam.canoe.ca, February 4, 2005
The Petes, rejuvenated by the return of coach Dick Todd following an 11-year absence, are second in the Eastern Conference at 24-15-6-4.

They missed the playoffs last season for the first time in 27 years, an OHL record for consecutive playoff appearances.

"The biggest thing we were missing from last year was the leadership coming right from the top from a guy like Dick," said Petes fourth-year forward Jamie Tardif.

"He demands a lot from his players, but at the same time we work hard for him. Even when he got his 500th win (in that game against the Knights), he didn't want any credit. He said, 'You guys did it all. You won the game,' and that's great from a coach."

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08-06-2011, 01:51 AM
  #177
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Jozef Stumpel, C



- 6'3", 222 lbs
- Top-12 in Assists 3 Times (4th, 5th, 12th)
- Top-20 in Points Twice (10th, 13th)
- Best Points percentages by the seventies system: 87, 77, 64, 62, 57, 50, 49, 47
- on pace for 88 & 74% in two injury-shortened seasons (2000, 2001)
- 8 points in 19 games in 5 best-on-best tournaments
- 32 points in 40 games in 6 other tournaments
- World Championship Gold & Bronze (2002, 2003)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1993 – 94
rangy and strong, Stumpel is an excellent skater adept at slipping away from checkers to find open ice. He fires rockets off the right wing and has a reputation for deadly accuracy. Like many European players, Stumpel is not predisposed to an aggressive style of play, relying on abundant finesse.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1994 – 95
Stumpel's best attribute is his skating. He has speed and agile, quick moves that can shake a defender. Add to that a long reach with good puck control, and Stumpel can make things happen even on the small ice surface of Boston Garden.… He has a deft scoring touch and is also a passer with a good short game.… Stumpel has good hockey sense and could probably be a decent special-teams player, but there are too many ahead of him on the depth chart… Stumpel is not an overly physical player, although he won't back down. He goes into the corners and bumps, and he protects the puck with his body… Stumpel has to learn to play with more emotion every night. He has solid games and then nights where he is a nonfactor…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1995 – 96
Stumpel took a big step forward last season, taking over as the Bruins second line center… Although the point production wasn't as consistent as the Bruins had hoped – he was a much less effective player on the road – he showed good chemistry with his new linemates… Is still adjusting to a full-time role. Given more time on the power play, he could respond to the responsibility… This will be a key season for him, with a new coach coming into Boston and the potential change again in his role…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1995-96
his determination to make it in the NHL is real, his work habits are very good, and his overall skill level is top-notch… He has all the right characteristics to make a good NHLer, but he hasn't been able to put it together yet.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sports Forecaster 1996 – 97
speed and agility are his strong points. Good puck control and a long reach. Will go into the corners and bump, but not grind. If the going gets tough, he's gone.… He will have to produce with limited talent on the wings. With his skills, he could be considered a sleeper.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 1996 – 97
firmly established himself as number two man behind Oates... Deft stickhandler and fine playmaker, he improved a great deal and has shown flashes of brilliance, but not enough to project himself as a future star. If he can maintain his intensity and play more physical on a nightly basis, he has a shot at being a point per game player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1996 – 97
smart and creative, Stumpel plays with the belief that he can make a difference, and it shows in his effort. Although he has been inconsistent at times, he has for the most part given a complete effort, using his skating and puck skills to put numbers on the board. When he subbed for injured Adam Oates on the team's top line last year, Stumpel showed he could be a team leader, though he's not the player to leave the team in scoring… The Bruins need Stumpel to outgrow his peaks and valleys and become a more consistent player. Early in the 1996 season, he was harshly judged to lack intensity. Later in the same season, he was lauded for being one of the team's best players. If he can find a way to keep his level of play high, he'll be in good shape.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1996 – 97
Stumpel was put in a position to succeed last season as the Bruins number two center and it proved to be the right spot for him, at least on this team… On a deeper team, Stumpel's lack of skating speed would drop down further on the depth chart… Stumpel took advantage of the ice time with improved point production, finally living up to the promise that his hand skills have always indicated… Stumpel is not an overly physical player and can be intimidated… He goes into the corners and bumps and he protects the puck with his body, but when the action gets really fierce, he backs off… Stumpel went from being a bubble player at the start of the season to a regular on the second line… He can hardly rest on one good season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1997 – 98
despite his limited game, Stumpel made the most of the ice time given to him as a number two center. Asking him to become a number one after the trade of Adam Oates was simply asking too much, and Stumpel could drop back to the second line… He has good hand skills, which allow him to compensate for his skating speed up to a point...
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sports Forecaster 1997 – 98
Stumpel led the Bruins in points and assists despite the fact that he was the teams second line center behind Adam Oates for most of the season… Given better linemates, the crafty playmaker could reach the 85 point level in a career year… Hand skills, nifty passer. Is now much more consistent in his production… He's no big bad Bruins in traffic areas… The little bravado inside him completely vanished in road games… Lacks speed for such a finesse type player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1998 – 99
Stumpel keeps getting put in situations where he is expected to be a number one center, but he is not in that elite class… He is very patient… Stumpel uses his feet well to keep the puck alive, kicking up onto his stick or keep it in the attacking zone… He has responded to the best of his ability to fulfill his role… Stumpel is quite powerfully built, but he doesn't play to his size. He can be intimidated, and teams go after him early. Opponents know how crucial Stumpel is to the King's attack, and that Stumpel will take a hit to make a play in the offensive zone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2000
he does not shoot nearly enough, and if he ends up playing with fellow Slovak Ziggy Palffy this season, he may not shoot at all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sports Forecaster 1999 – 2000
after a career year in 1998, Stumpel regressed badly last season due to a series of injuries and teams Lack of offense. One of the better passers in the league, the Slovak was a major reason for the King's inconsistencies. Though 6 foot three and 216 pounds, Stumpel's game is finesse and skill. He sees the ice well and anticipates where linemates will be
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 1999 – 2000
much of the Kings' offensive woes can be traced to this talented Slovak who battled a barrage of injuries from preseason hip and ankle problems to a late-season knee injury, and never regained his form of the two previous seasons. Skilled playmaker and slick puck handler lacks overwhelming speed and despite being solid defensively last year, failed to provide the offensive creativity that netted him consecutive years of 76 and 79 points… Expect a big rebound.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2000 – 2001
for the second consecutive season the King's watched their top center men struggle with various injuries including hernia surgery last November, however he played very well when healthy and was especially effective down the stretch… Slick, playmaking pivot has excellent strength on the puck, sees the ice extremely well and can handle himself defensively, but what holds him back from being an NHL superstar is his mediocre speed and skating… Management has legitimate concerns about his durability.
Quote:
Originally Posted by the Sports Forecaster 2000 – 2001
at top form, Stumpel is a point per game man. He regained that status last season with the help of new linemates… But injuries nonetheless limited his effectiveness on occasion. After being sidelined twice, the slick center man bounced back after the All-Star game to perform at the level the Kings feel he can
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2001
the arrival of Ziggy Palffy put Stumpel in a position where he was destined to succeed. Stumpel is a setup man, Palffy a finisher. Both come from the Slovakian hockey system and are great pals, and their styles mesh perfectly.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sports Forecaster 2001 – 2002
after re-signing late, the Kings number one center never truly got on track last season. While Stumpel continued to play well at both ends of the ice, his production level was well below expectations. On a positive note, the big Slovakian pivot played at a consistent level throughout the postseason. One aspect of the game that Stumpel must improve upon is his ability to stay healthy, since he has averaged just 65 games in four seasons in Los Angeles. Is a smooth playmaker and nifty stickhandler… While the team is satisfied with his two-way play, they need Stumpel to approach his career-high in points.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sports Forecaster 2002 – 2003
it's hard for 6'3" 225 pounder to disappear. However, the Slovakian center did just that in round one of the Stanley Cup playoffs against Montréal.… Stumpel just doesn't shoot enough to score a lot of goals. His game is cerebral and based on finesse… He'll certainly rack up assists the Bruins need more goals and consistency.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2003
Stumpel is a setup man and he needs to play with a stone finisher. Stumpel doesn't have much sand in his game and achieves everything with finesse… Not a him crunch time player
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2002 – 2003
often injured Slovak returned to Beantown in October's Jason Allison deal and was carrying the B's offense the third quarter before vanishing during the stretch run and playoffs… A talented playmaker Stumpel's game is based on puck control, using his size, strength and soft hands to buy time in traffic, that he is a sluggish skater with no extra gear to handle the quicker playoff pace, and is still reluctant to utilize his very good shot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sports Forecaster 2003 – 2004
Stumpel's production has dipped, since flirting with the point a game Mark in the mid-1990s. Still, he hopes a return to LA will rekindle his offenses ability after coming over from Boston… His game is defined by finesse and puck distribution, and he's also effective in the face-off circle The big Slovak should throw his weight around more and fire more pucks on goal.… Could be an ideal second line center.
Quote:
Originally Posted by the Sports Forecaster 2006 – 2007
how slow was Stumpel's start last season? He started off with just four points in 24 games before tallying 48 points in 46 games – only to sustain a hip flexor injury. A skilled, intelligent center who moved to right wing last year, the Slovak sees the ice very well and find the open man with ease. He is somewhat injury prone but, as he proved in the second half, still has the touch that saw him garner 79 points for Los Angeles.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sports Forecaster 2007 – 2008
for the second straight season, the slick, intelligent veteran piled on the offense in the second half. After starting the year with 14 points in 31 contests, Stumpel then produced 43 points in 42 games. Notorious for choosing to pass over shooting, Stumpel tried to shake his reputation by firing more shots on net than he had in any of the last eight seasons. The result was a new career high in goals.


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-06-2011 at 03:42 AM.
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Old
08-06-2011, 03:01 AM
  #178
chaosrevolver
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RW - Erik Cole

Quote:
Originally Posted by Forecaster
Has great skating ability and work ethic. Hits anything that moves. Plays a gritty, in-your-face style and owns solid scoring instincts.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
The following year Cole and the NHL returned to action. Cole entered into his fourth NHL season with the Hurricanes primed for one of his best offensive years of his young career. Cole over-delivered on what was expected of him offensively, totaling 30 goals in 60 games played. Cole's season however would be cut short as he was unexpectedly slammed into the boards awkwardly by XXXXX XXXXX of the Pittsburgh Penguins. After a careful examination, Cole was told he had sustained a compression fracture in a vertebra in his neck. While injured Erik could only watch as his team mates rolled through the first three rounds of the NHL playoffs. However, Cole returned in game six of the Stanley Cup Final, just one game prior to hoisting the Stanley Cup on home ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Who's Who in Hockey
Rookie Erik Cole was not even one of the three finalists for the Calder Trophy as NHL Rookie of the Year at the end of the regular campaign. But once the playoffs started – Carolina vs. New Jersey in round one – the six-feet, 185-pound left wing emerged as a dominant force.

Going head-to-head with crack defensemen such as Scott Stevens of the Devils, Cole displayed the savvy of a veteran power forward and was regarded by critics as a key factor in the Hurricanes six-game triumph over New Jersey. Cole continued his stellar play in round two and round three victories over Montreal and Toronto respectively.

By the Stanley Cup finals—Carolina versus Detroit—Cole had become so dangerous that the eventual champion Red Wings gave him special attention. When the playoffs were over, Cole had a total of six goals and three assists, by far the best of any rookie in the playoffs, including a game-winning tally.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Art of Scouting
MacDonald and his staff often use Erik Cole as a model for prospects they are considering. Cole is particularly known for his two and three-step quickness, which allows him to change speed and break away from an opponent.

“One of the guys that we have on our roster and use as a model for skating is Erik Cole, as he has deceptive speed with the ability to change gears. When he comes down on defensemen, they usually underestimate how fast he is going until it's almost too late.”
Accomplishments
* Stanley Cup Winner (2006)
* Top-20 Hits (2007, 2008, 2011)
* Top-10 in Game Winning Goals (2006, 2011)
* Top-15 in Goals per Game (2006)
* Regular Season Statistics: 620 Games, 184 Goals, 206 Assists, 390 Points
* National Team Statistics: 20 Games, 3 Goals, 11 Assists, 14 Points
* 2006-2008: 204 Games, 81 Goals, 90 Assists, 171 Points
* 2006-2011 TKA/GVA: 236/189
* Did all of this despite missing 86 games between 2006-2010

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Old
08-06-2011, 03:27 AM
  #179
chaosrevolver
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D - Arthur Moore

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette – January 19th, 1903
Arthur Moore and Harvey Pulford on the defense simply refused to allow the Montreal anyways near Bouse Hutton. They bodychecked hard, and after the first few minutes Dickie Boon’s forwards were content to shoot at long range. Both lifted well too and kept their forwards well fed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Montreal Gazette – February 15th, 1905
Perhaps the defense of the Ottawa Stanley Cup holders is the best on the ice today, and the men in front of the goalkeeper are ; Pulford, point, and Moore, cover-point. Both strapping big men, they do not use boarding school methods to handle the enemy as it sweeps upon them… Moore can also accomplish a little body-checking on occasion. He, too, is no gentle lamb, and many a forward can show black and blue marks decorating his anatomy to prove it. But they both played fine hockey, lifting the puck well, and are effective working at all times. A formidable pair.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen – January 10th, 1907
Much regret has been expressed for Arthur Moore personally for serlous accident, while the effect of his absence on the team’s chances is forming of much anxiety among the fans.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Regina Standard – March 14th, 1906
Arthur Moore is this year playing point for the team and doing better work than he formerly performed at cover. Cool, accurate lifting is his forte, but Moore is likewise a very dangerous man for opposing forwards to cope with. He is probably the fastest man with the Rough Riders and a few year ago was a defense player for the Capitals lacrosse team.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canada.com
Mr. Moore was a defenseman, before that word was even coined. He is described as tough, "stay-at-home”, a husky presence in his own end who could deliver punishing checks.
Accomplishments
* 4 x Stanley Cup Champion (1903, 1904, 1905, 1906)
* Scored Cup-winning goal in 1904
* First Team All-Star (1905)

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Old
08-06-2011, 03:41 AM
  #180
seventieslord
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Earl Robertson, G



- 5'10", 165 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1937)
- NHL 2nd All-Star Team (1939)
- NHL "3rd" All-Star Team (1940)
- Top-5 in Hart Voting Twice (4th, 5th)
- Sterling 1.75 playoff GAA
- Played 337 other Senior level games
- Career ended due to WW2 shortly after NHL demotion (which followed two seasons in which he slowly lost his job to the younger HHOFer Chuck Rayner, whose GAA was just 8% better)

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
From 1934 to 1936, he played for the Windsor Bulldogs of the IAHL and seemed to only get better with experience. The Detroit Red Wings took notice of the goaltender's skills and purchased his rights from the Bulldogs. The Wings' brass tucked Robertson away with their minor-league affiliate in Pittsburgh for the start of the 1936-37 campaign. He put in a solid season and was rewarded with a shot in Detroit at the start of the playoffs. (editor's note, incorrect) It must have been quite breathtaking for the netminder to progress from the Hollywood Stars to the Wings, play only six games with a stingy 1.41 goals-against average, and claim a Stanley Cup victory. It would never be any better for the aged rookie goalie.

But in spite of his success, Roberston was traded to the New York Americans shortly after the confetti from the victory parade had been swept up. The Amerks were a club that had their bright moments, but couldn't seem to get on track to win a championship. During his four seasons with the club, the Americans' fortunes only seemed to sag with time. By 1940-41, Robertson finished the season with a 6-22-8 record.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
Long before Ken Dryden came in and stole the cup for Montreal in 1971, Earl Robertson was putting on a great pinch-hitting show of his own in goal. He had been playing pro for a number of years and had worked his way into Detroit's system. In the 1937 playoffs, he was called in to replace an injured Normie Smith and promptly took the Wings past Montreal and the Rangers to win the cup. He was then traded to the Americans, who were looking to fill the void left by Roy Worters, and Robertson came in and did it again. He was their starter for four and a half years and performed incredibly well for a weak team, but in 1942 he went off to war. He served with the 19th Alberta Dragoons, and when he came out his career was over.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Earl Robertson was the unlikely hero of the 1937 Detroit Red Wings Stanley Cup championship squad. Robertson, a 10 year minor leaguer, was called up to replace the Wings' starting goalie Normie Smith. Smith injured his elbow in round one against Montreal. It swelled up so much that he could not play against the New York Rangers in the finals. In total Detroit was missing five regulars for the finals.

For Robertson it was his first taste of NHL action. Imagine that! It is your first game and you are in net for game one of the Stanley Cup finals! Talk about pressure! But Robertson performed miraculously in leading the Wings to the Cup. He led Detroit to a three games to two victory. In the final two games he recorded consecutive shutouts!

After adding a Stanley Cup ring to his resume, Robertson was all but assured of NHL employment the following season. However the Wings decided to stay with Smith and traded Robertson to the New York Americans for Red Doran and cash. It was a good move for Robertson. He was the team's undisputed number one goalie for the next three years, posting 51 wins and 15 shutouts while missing only 2 games. He was even named to the NHL second all star team in 1939.

However Robertson's fine play could only carry the financially troubled Americans so far. The team in front of him was one of the weakest in the league, and by 1940 it really showed in the standings. The team went 15-29-4 and missed the playoffs. That was the beginning of the end for Robertson.

The Americans had a hot young prospect waiting for a chance to play in the net. That prospect was future Hall of Famer Chuck Rayner.

Rayner and Robertson battled it out for the starting job for the Americans, with Robertson playing 36 of 48 games in 1940-41. Rayner played the remaining 12 games but also was fine tuning his game in the minor leagues. By 1941-42, the tables were turned. Rayner played in 36 games while Robertson played in just 12, and played most of the season in the minor leagues.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary daily Herald, April 9, 1937
… Smith's place was taken by pinch hitter Earl Robertson, who put up a great display.…
Quote:
Originally Posted by The leader Post, April 16, 1937
BARRY EMERGES AS HERO OF SERIES, BUT EARL ROBERTSON WAS NOT FAR BEHIND - ... Robertson let in a few goals but he made more sensational saves than anybody ever figured he would… Earl Robertson, the rookie goalie, scored two shutouts in succession and he emerges as a series hero.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskatoon star Phoenix, May 14, 1937
Earl Robertson, hero of hockey's 1937 Stanley Cup series, did not get a cut Detroit Red Wings series money, manager Jack Adams announced today, but the goalie who replaced injured nor B Smith in the nets to help the wings right hockey history was well taken care of. James Norris Senior, owner of the club that twice won the cup in successive years, insisted on looking after Robertson personally, Adams said. He gave him a check for $600.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montréal Gazette, November 4, 1937
… Earl Robinson, sensational rookie goalie…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lewiston daily Sun, November 5, 1937
probably the most expensive of the American purchases was that of Earl Robertson, Detroit's spare goalie who was the hero of the Stanley Cup playoffs last March
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montréal Gazette, December 29, 1937
… No, Smith is not entirely blameless, by any means. But his record reflects the weakness of the team as a whole.… Maybe, the wings, as a team, are going better now as Detroit reports indicate, and it is Smith who is leading them down.… This discussion raises another point that probably won't be overlooked by Detroit critics: the fact that Adams let Earl Robertson get away from him, after Robertson had starred for him in an emergency rule in the playoffs. Adams sold to the Americans, and prior to last night games Robertson's record was 30 goals-against as compared to Smith's 54.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary daily Herald, January 5, 1938
… You could almost put Earl Robinson, Americans goalie, one of the best in the league this season, in that class. In the middle of last season, Earl was spare goalie for Detroit and when Roy Worters was hurt, manager Jack Adams offered Robinson to Dutton for $1500. Red claims he thought highly of Earl then but his team was shot with injuries and sickness with no chance of getting in the playoffs and he didn't want to put Earl in there without reasonable protection. He thought he would be able to buy him at the end of the season for the same price but Earl got his chance in the Stanley Cup playoffs when Norm Smith, regular Detroit goalie, was injured, and he played sensational hockey for the Red Wings. When Dutton offered manager Jack Adams $1500 for Robinson at the end of the season, the Detroit manager shook his head. He said Robertson was worth $16,000 then and the Americans paid it. Likely Adams is sorry he sold Earl at any price for his team has been doing anything but when hockey games this season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leader Post, February 21, 1938
Toronto Maple Leafs shutout Saturday night for the first time in the NHL season. Earl Robertson, Regina goalie with New York Americans, did it four – zero in such spectacular fashion the 12,800 fans were cheering as much for him as for the leafs in the late stages of the game...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary daily Herald, April 9, 1938
Schriner, who finished seventh among the NHL scorers this season said that Earl Robertson, the club's goalie, was the outstanding player this season. "When the going is toughest, he kept us in there by his sensational netminder," said Schriner.
Quote:
Originally Posted by the telegraph, February 20, 1939.
… Earl Robertson, rated one of the three or four best goalies in the league
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary daily Herald, February 13, 1939
… The third-place American scored a one to nothing victory over Detroit Red Wings at New York last night… Americans, recovering from a brief slump, were outplayed much of the way in the dull New York tilt, but goalie Earl Robertson threw back the best of the Red Wings threats.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Evening Independent, March 23, 1939
… The Americans, who have lost confidence since an injury cost of the services of regular goalie Earl Robertson…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lewiston daily Sun, December 4, 1939
Only Earl Robertson's goaltending prevented Boston from running the total to double figures as the Americans, playing their second game in as many nights, faded.…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Herald, December 5, 1939
agile Earl Robertson, mainstay of the New York Americans and more than a few of their games, slides out in front of his goal to thwart scoring attempts by Toronto Maple Leafs during the game in which the American scored their first win of the season by a two to one count over the leafs in New York – and mainly because of the same Earl Robertson
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newark Sunday call, March 10, 1940
the veteran Earl Robertson turned in one of the greatest goaltending exhibitions of the season last night when his New York American forces dented the Boston Bruins NHL championship hopes by subjecting them to a 4 to 2 drubbing at the Boston Garden. The Bruins, who lead the hard pressing Rangers by only a point, were in dire need of a 13th consecutive victory over the Americans, but Robertson cheated them in such spectacular fashion that the crowd of 11,172 roared a mighty ovation.

... Robertson kicked out at least a dozen of earned goals as he stopped the amazingly high total of 50 shots during the 60 min. of furious play. He stopped 23 shots before little Bobby Bauer drove the first goal through him in the second period.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Herald, March 20, 1940
only the brilliant work of Earl Robertson kept the Americans in the game throughout the third.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmonton Journal, January 30, 1941
… That is no definite suggestion that Rayner may become puck dropped from combating the well-known inadequacies of the Americans defense. You remember the sensation Earl Robertson was when he started with Americans? Mr. Robertson now is with Springfield. And he was a great goalkeeper.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Herald, February 18, 1941
Earl Robertson isn't a fellow to sulk when demoted. He's just plugging along, hoping that soon he will again be back in the big time. Three weeks ago, "Robbie," who staved off many a defeat for New York Americans, was told by manager red Dutton he was being shipped to the minors… It was a bitter pill to swallow for one with 12 years service in Pro hockey, for Robbie, perhaps more than any other member of the team, had been responsible for the Americans making the playoffs the last three years. But he took it without protest... This season was his worst with the Americans, when with poor defense protection he let through 105 goals in 29 games.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskatoon star Phoenix, July 29, 1942 Earl Robertson may be through with professional hockey. [B
The great net man who grew old inside from doing all the goalkeeping, bodychecking, passing and back checking for Brooklyn Americans[/B], has a more job in Edmonton and it will be hard to pry him loose…


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-06-2011 at 05:00 AM.
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08-06-2011, 03:44 AM
  #181
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D - Bob Plager

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blood On the Ice
During his NHL career he has been injury prone, due in great part to the kind of game he plays. His ribs were fractured by Henri Richard when the Pocket Rocket had seen him coming at the last instant and instinctively lifted his knee. "It's an automatic reflex, I'd have done the same thing," said Bob with no malice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1972
Want to fight or fool around? Then Bob Plager is your man... Burly Bob loves a brawl, with anybody... once fought brother Barclay, when bother were minor leaguers...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1973
Rock 'em sock-em type who delights in body contact... loves to mix it up
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1974
The club used 11 defensemen. The Plager brothers were the best, and should continue to be... rough and tough... moustache and bushy hair give him a menacing look... not at all shy about fighting and brawling... colorful player...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1975
Hampered by injuries, but he's still one of the NHL's greatest competitors... master of the hip check... fearless shot blocker...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montréal Gazette, November 16, 1968
"Barclay explodes; were trying to get him to calm down," says Bob. "He gets too many penalties for retaliation. Me, I can wait two years to get a guy. But Barclay explodes on the spot. We tell them to wait until the ref isn't looking."… "We use the hip check," says Bob. "That's the best way to hit a guy and not get hurt yourself. And you got to hit guys in this game. I know, if I hit a guy on my first shift, I'm off to a good night."… "You just don't find them like the Plagers anymore," says Patrick.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montréal Gazette, April 17, 1969
the solidly built defenseman kept his eyes riveted on a videotape machine that the NHL team uses to film important games… Plager had won an easy decision over Bill Flett of Los Angeles Tuesday night… "That's a good one," he said as he watched himself deck Flett with a flurry of punches.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LA Times, January 4, 1971
The game was six min old and the Blues were leading 1-00 when Bob Plager flipped (Pulford) into the air with a savage block. Pulford landed on his... (snippet of pay article)
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Day, January 9, 1973
**** **** of the New York Rangers took a board check from St. Louis defenseman Bob Plager. The result was a cracked collarbone. "I was in so much pain that I went to my knees a couple of times," he said
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montréal Gazette, February 7, 1976
Mario Tremblay shouldn't feel too bad about getting a beating from St. Louis defenseman Bob Plager. Although not especially famous as a hockey fighter, Plager wears the NHL heavyweight crown as a barroom battler…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beaver Country Times, March 9, 1977
In the first minute, Bob Plager smashed ****** into the boards and the rookie fell heavily…
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Times, March 27, 1977
Bob Plager, their 34-year-old defenseman, threw an across-block at Bryan Trottier , upending the Islander forward as well as himself...
Accomplishments
- Three-time Stanley Cup Finalist (1968, 1969, 1970)
- 74 playoff games, 3rd-most among available D-men whose careers started before 1975 and therefore missed the 4-round, 7-game playoff era entirely.
- 2nd-most prolific penalty killer available, killing 55% of his team's penalties (the one player ahead at 59% will likely fall below 55% before his partial career is over)
- voted the league's hardest hitter in a 1971 coaches poll, tied with Bob Baun.
- voted the league's hardest hitter in a 1974 Player's Poll and voted 2nd by the coaches after Barclay (who, incidentally, was 3rd in the player's vote)
- averaged 22.41 minutes per game in his post-expansion career, which was 95.5% of his career. This is outstanding for a player selected in the 1300s!
- averaged 22.07 non-PP minutes per game, which is even more impressive. Barclay averaged 22.04 in his career in the exact same seasons for the exact same career, meaning the only difference between their usage by coaches, was the 1.77 PP minutes Barclay received per game.
- Placed 1st (ahead of Barclay & Arbour), 4th (behind Barclay & Harvey, ahead of Arbour), 3rd (behind Barclay & Arbour, ahead of Talbot), 3rd (behind Barclay), 4th (behind Barclay, Dupont, & Brewer), 1st (ahead of Barclay), 2nd (behind Awrey, ahead of Barclay), 1st (ahead of Barclay), 3rd (ahead of Barclay), 5th in ES icetime on Blues in his 10 "full" seasons
- He is one of just two available defensemen to average 22+ minutes per game and get into 70+ playoff games, indicating that he was valuable to good teams with the ability to advance far or at least make the playoffs on a regular basis.
- Career adjusted -4

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08-06-2011, 03:51 AM
  #182
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D - Jack Ruttan


Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
John "Jack" Ruttan was an amateur hockeyist through and through and never considered turning professional. His playing career began with the Armstrong's Point hockey team that won the juvenile championship of Winnipeg in the 1905-06 season. He switched to the Rustler club the following season and it in turn also won the city juvenile championship. By 1907-08, Ruttan was playing for the St. John's College team, which won the Manitoba University Hockey League championship that season.

He moved up to senior hockey in 1909 and played for the Manitoba Varsity hockey team as they won the championship of the Winnipeg Senior Hockey League in the 1909-10 season. Ruttan stayed with the Varsity team through two more seasons before moving on to play for the Winnipeg Hockey Club in 1912-13.

The "Winnipegers" won everything in sight that season, starting with the Winnipeg League championship and culminating with the Allan Cup as senior hockey champions of Canada. Ruttan recalled later that the Allan Cup win, emblematic of amateur hockey supremacy, was the greatest thrill of his hockey career.

He remained in hockey for many years after his playing days had ended. He coached the Winnipeg senior hockey team during the 1919-20 season and officiated in the Winnipeg Senior League from 1920 through 1922, and then coached the University of Manitoba team for a year in 1923-24.

Jack Ruttan was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1962.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Total Hockey
A legendary figure in Winnipeg hockey during a time when the city was one of the most important hockey centers in Canada.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Hall of Fame
His stature in Winnipeg was such that he became an example for younger players.
Accomplishments
- Member of the HHOF
- Allan Cup (1913)
- Winnipeg Juvenile Champion (1906, 1907)
- Manitoba University Champion (1908)
- Manitoba Senior Champion (1910)

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08-06-2011, 04:13 AM
  #183
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D - Frank Eddolls

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
In 1947-48, Eddolls joined the New York Rangers where he would enjoy five strong NHL seasons. In his first year with the club, he scored 19 points and served as the team's captain in 1950-51.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Now Back to You Dick: Two Lifetimes in Hockey
Eddolls is known as one of the very few defensemen that consistently succeeded in defending the legendary Maurice "Rocket" Richard.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Who's Who in Hockey
Eddolls became one of the best defensemen in the NHL... Thanks to Eddolls, the Rangers made the playoffs in 1947-48 for the first time in six years... starred for the New Yorkers in the 1950 playoffs when the Rangers took the Red Wings to the seventh game of the finals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Montreal Canadiens: Our History
Eddolls spent the last five NHL seasons of his playing career with the Broadway Blueshirts, one of the Rangers’ most popular and effective performers.
Accomplishments
* Stanley Cup Winner (1946)
* All-Star Game (1951)
* 3rd in Defensive Point Shares (1945)
* New York Rangers Captain (1951)

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08-06-2011, 04:18 AM
  #184
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Billy Harris, RW



- 6'2", 195 lbs
- 7th in Playoff Scoring (1977)
- 11th in Selke Voting (1977)
- 5th in RW All-Star voting (1976)
- Killed 22% of penalties for his teams
- best percentages by seventies method: 59, 58, 55, 52, 50, 49
- best ES percentages: 61, 60, 59, 56, 55, 51, 46, 44
- Played in NHL All-Star Game (1976)
- Ironman streak spanned over 7 full seasons

Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide Of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
He was a fine two-way player and used his size well
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1973
not an exceptional skater but big and strong
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1974
after a slow start, husky RW ended season as Islanders' leading scorer... bright, articulate rookie handled pressure well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1975
both his first seasons have been disappointing to some; however, this talented RW has played under pressure and for a losing team... many observers feel all he needs is a veteran center to boost his goal output... like Denis Potvin, he has shot size, desire to be outstanding...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1976
had successful season, placing 2nd in Islanders scoring...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1977
improving each season... one of team's leaders...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1978
slowly developing into steady two-way RW... still looking for first season as explosive goal scorer... scores goals in streaks and then slumps... makes game look easy with his fluid skating... popular, pleasant chap.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1979
size, strength and determination... steady two-way RW... durable player... has also played center.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1980
durable player who has never missed a game... nearly had streak broken when cut over right eyelid, but discarded patch after one day to keep streak alive...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1981
big, strong two-way winger... play declined in past two seasons but he is young enough to bounce back... uses size and strength well, especially in overpowering defensemen for a move on the net... a fine player with leadership qualities.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1982
Another solid, experienced addition who helped boost team to fine 1981 season...has played all three forward positions for the Kings... excellent defensive player and penalty killer.. extremely durable, he has missed only one game due to injury in nine seasons.

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08-06-2011, 04:22 AM
  #185
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Rover - Billy Barlow

Quote:
"the most graceful skater of the party" who "gave a brilliant exhibition of skating backwards", "--Barlow was always a shadow that could not be shaken off, and turned the corners so cleverly and swiftly that he was always able to hold to his companion, and seemed able to pass him at any time if he chose to do so."
ALL TIME GOAL SCORING LIST AT THE END OF THE 1899 SEASON:
1. Bob McDougall (VICS) 49
2. A. E. "Dolly" Swift (Que) 37
3. Clary MacKerrow (MAAA) 34
4. Billy Barlow (MAAA) 33
5. Haviland Routh (MAAA) 32
6. Graham Drinkwater (Vics) 28

***Barlow is credited with scoring the first Stanley Cup-winning goal in history in the final playoff match of 1894, actually scoring twice in each of the two playoff games, heralded as the hero of the game.

***The year before, in 1893, he was instrumental in his team winning the Stanley Cup, which was decided based on best regular season record: "Billy Barlow was outstanding in the AAA's late season victory over Ottawa to secure first place and the Cup."

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08-06-2011, 04:35 AM
  #186
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LW - Dutch Hiller

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
His first Ranger games unfolded in 1937 where, as a member of the "Roughneck" line, he joined Phil Watson and Bryan Hextall in making life difficult for the opposition.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CBC
considered one of the fastest skaters of his era...
Quote:
Originally Posted by RangersPundit
Ironically, the last three survivors of that Cup team before Hiller's passing was his entire line -- Clint "Snuffy" Smith and Alf Pike were his linemates. Smith, the oldest living Cup winner in the NHL, recently told John Halligan for an article to be included in the next issue of Blueshirt Bulletin that “Dutch was the fastest [skater]. Nobody could keep up with him, not in the entire League.”
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lord Stanley's Cup
in the 1941 playoffs, Dutch Hiller got into hot water with his boss Lester Patrick. He showed up for the final game of the Rangers and Detroit semifinals with All his bags packed, assigned Patrick to me that Hiller thought the team would lose and he wanted to get out of town right away. "I never packed my bags because I thought we would lose," he tried to explain. "I thought we would win." Regardless, two days after the win Patrick traded him to Detroit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fischler's Hockey Encyclopedia
when the Rangers won the Stanley Cup in 1940 they had one of the speediest clubs the NHL has ever known. The fastest this group was Dutch Hiller, one of many Kitchener, Ontario natives to reach the majors. "Dutch wasn't too big," said his coach Frank Boucher, "but he simply glided with an unusual gait which he seemed to lift himself above the ice with each stride."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
the Rangers PR department didn't much like the name Wilbert and instead called him Dutch because he was always in dutch, i.e. in trouble, on the ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 100 Ranger Greats
..according to those who played with him, and perhaps more important, those who played against him, Dutch Hiller was the fastest skater of his era, bar none. It was Hiller the fastest skater to ever play for the Rangers? Probably yes, but each era has a claimant to that honor… Hiller remembers muscling the puck away from Ted Kennedy behind the Rangers net and whistling at crisp pass to Phil Watson at the first blueline… Watson found Hextall protected… Hextall's sharp backhander eluded Turk Broda's catching glove, and the Rangers were celebrating their third Stanley Cup championship… Primarily a defensive player...
Accomplishments
- Stanley Cup (1940, 1946)
- Top-23 in Points 3 Times (13th, 23rd, 23rd)
- Top-10 in Playoff Points Twice (6th, 9th)
- Ranked # on the Recent Top-100 Rangers List, despite playing only 4 full seasons with them

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08-06-2011, 04:55 AM
  #187
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RW - Bud Poile

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Born in Fort William, Ontario, Poile was a local hero with a fine scoring touch and a deadly accurate shot. He was leading the Thunder Bay League in scoring when the Toronto Maple Leafs signed him to a professional contract in November 1942. He led Toronto in playoff scoring in 1943 and formed the effective "Flying Forts" line with fellow Fort William natives Gus Bodnar and Gaye Stewart.

After serving in World War II, he returned to Toronto and won a Stanley Cup in 1947. Poile seemed set in Toronto but was stunned when he was one of the "five ordinary players" sent to Chicago for superstar centre Max Bentley. Poile went on to play for five of the Original Six teams, the lone exception being Montreal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by USA Today: February 4th, 2000
"I was making about $6,000 or $7,000 with Toronto when I was traded to Chicago," [Star Bud Poile] recalls. "I got to Chicago and general manager Bill Tobin said, 'My God, that's a terrible salary. That (Conn) Smythe is a cheap son of a gun.' He said I will give you $11,000 if you make the All-Star team. I think he thought me making the All-Star team was far-fetched."

Here and there: The 1946-47 season was Gordie Howe's first in the NHL, and he didn't make the All-Star Game. For years on the banquet circuit, Bud Poile liked to say he took Howe's spot.
Accomplishments
* 1947 Stanley Cup Champion
* 1948 2nd Team All-Star
* All-Star Game (1947, 1948)
* Top Goal Finishes: 7th (1948), 10th (1949), 17th (1950)
* Top Assist Finishes: 6th (1948), 16th (1949)
* Top Point Finishes: 5th (1948), 11th (1949)

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08-06-2011, 05:05 AM
  #188
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RW - Mac Colville

Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander
The glue guy on one of the greatest lines in NHL history, right winger Mac Colville. He played a role on one of the top lines in hockey for six years in the NHL, and while he had three years with top-20 stats it's almost unfair to mention scoring at all as his job was more defensive, as indeed most great lines have a role player to do the little things like dig pucks out of corners, create turnovers and check. He is described as a "tireless worker" and that is not surprising.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYTimes
Mac scored two goals in the opener of the Rangers' semifinal playoff series in 1940 against the Boston Bruins, and the Rangers went on to win the Stanley Cup against the Toronto Maple Leafs.

Mac paid attention to defensive play. ''I did all the backchecking."
***His playoff experience is pretty good for his era, with 19 NHL playoff points in an impressive 40 postseason games between 1937-42, including two finals and a stanley cup championship.

Accomplishments
* Stanley Cup Champion (1940)
* Top Goal Finishes: 16th (1941), 20th (1938)
* Top Assist Finishes: 12th (1939)

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08-06-2011, 05:14 AM
  #189
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LW - Jörgen Pettersson

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Jorgen Pettersson had skated six seasons in the Swedish Elite League with Vastra Frolunda before he was finally enticed to cross the Atlantic to take on the NHL.

The enticement came from St. Louis Blues GM Emile Francis. He personally flew to Stockholm to verify that the stylish, speedy Swede was the real deal. Impressed with his disciplined play and puck handling skills, Francis brought him to St. Louis and placed him on a line with xxxxx xxxxxx and Joe Mullen. The fit was right as Pettersson made a mark on the league by registering 73 points in 62 games.

Over succeeding seasons, he continued to develop into a more complete package as an outstanding penalty killer and above-average defensive player who was willing to bump with the opposition. Pettersson's scoring pace remained steady through 1985 when Emile Francis, then the Whalers' GM, brought his former prospect over to Hartford. His stay was short, however, before he was dispatched to the Capitals for a final NHL stint of 55 games.

Pettersson then decided to return to his native Sweden where he rejoined the Swedish Elite League for four additional seasons before retiring in 1990-91.
Accomplishments
* Three 35+ Goal Seasons (1981, 1982, 1983)
* 1981-1984: 290 Games, 138 Goals, 139 Assists, 278 Points

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08-06-2011, 05:53 AM
  #190
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LW - Rob Zamuner

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Hockey News
ASSETS: Big, strong and versatile forward was primarily known for his defensive brilliance but could also help out on offense during his prime years thanks to yeoman's work. Never recorded a 20-goal campaign in the NHL yet came close on a handful of occasions. Signed as a free agent by the expansion Tampa Bay Lightning in 1992, he captained the same club later in 1998-99. A career highlight proved to be his participation as a member of Team Canada in the 1998 Olympics.
Quote:
Originally Posted by God Bless Canada
Zamuner was the best defensive LW left on my list. I wouldn't pick a defensive specialist in this, though. He was probably one of the top five or so defensive forwards in the league from 1993 to 1998, but he was shafted in the Selke voting because that's when voters were looking at an offensive player who backchecks. (The 1995-96 Selke vote might be the biggest joke for any award in NHL history). Jere Lehtinen and Mike Peca would have never won their Selkes if they had to face those voting standards
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
Internationally, Zamuner played twice on Canada's world championship teams. Zamuner's unprecedented defensive play, along with his exceptional face-off taking ability led to a surprise selection on Canada's 1998 Olympic men's hockey team.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Various Wiki Articles
In Tampa he developed a reputation as a competent, hard working, defensive-minded forward, and was named team captain in 1998.
Accomplishments
* Top-5 in Shorthanded Goals (1995, 1997)
* National Level Statistics: 22 Games, 5 Goals, 4 Assists, 9 Points

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08-06-2011, 06:42 AM
  #191
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G - Ilya Bryzgalov

Quote:
Originally Posted by Forecaster
Has great size and goaltending instincts. Possesses a wealth of experience in big-game situations. Is well liked by his teammates. Can be spectacular when he's on.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Bryzgalov represented Russia at the 2006 Winter Olympics and later returned to the NHL to appear in 27 games throughout the Ducks 2006-07 season. In the subsequent playoffs, Bryzgalov stepped in for fellow netminder J-S Giguere and helped the Ducks through four games of the Western Conference Quarter Finals. Giguere took over in game five of the series and the Ducks went on the capture the Stanley Cup in 2007.

In Phoenix, Bryzgalov emerged as one of the NHL's top goaltenders, leading the Coyotes to back-to-back playoff appearances and consistently keeping his goals against average under 2.50.
Accomplishments
* Stanley Cup Champion (2007)
* NHL 2nd All-Star Team (2010)
* Top Wins Finishes: 3rd (2010), 6th (2011), 16th (2008), 17th (2009)
* Top GAA Finishes: 6th (2010), 7th (2006), 16th (2008)
* Top SV% Finishes: 8th (2008), 9th (2010), 10th (2011), 14th (2006)
* Top Shutout Finishes: 2nd (2010), 4th (2011), 17th (2009), 20th (2008)
* NHL Regular Season Statistics: 156-115-35, 2.53 GAA, .916 SV%, 23 SO
* NHL Playoff Statistics: 12-13, 2.55 GAA, .917 SV%, 3 SO
* National Level Statistics: 2-3, 2.50 GAA, .921 SV%, 0 SO

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08-06-2011, 06:58 AM
  #192
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D - Keith Carney

Quote:
Originally Posted by SBNation
Sound in his own end, he was often responsible for shutting down the opposition's best players. Had the durability and size to play a physical defensive game. Led by example.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabreslegends
A big, tough stay-at-home defenseman, Carney was the Sabres' top defensive prospect in the early 1990's. Carney played well in his own end of the ice, and had the speed to join in on the rush offensively, though his offensive potential was rarely realized during his time in Buffalo.

In Chicago, Carney developed into one of the league's top penalty killing defensemen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
With the Hawks, Carney matured and developed into a solid defenceman and during his four full seasons there he helped anchor a developing corps of talent. But the team never advanced very far, and late in the 1997-98 season he was traded to the Phoenix Coyotes. Just weeks earlier he had represented the USA at the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan.

After four seasons in Phoenix, Carney was dealt to the Anaheim Mighty Ducks in 2001-02 and was a valuable asset on the Ducks blueline, helping the club reach the Stanley Cup final in 2003 against the eventual Cup champions from New Jersey.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seventieslord
Carney was my #1 guy heading into AAA1. he wouldn't have been my #1 defenseman, but probably the first one I took. He's an absolutely elite penalty killer at that level, and a very good one in the MLD.
Accomplishments
* Defensive Point Shares: 5th (1997), 7th (1996)
* Finished 7th in Plus/Minus (1996)
* Regular Season Statistics: 1018 Games, 45 Goals, 183 Assists, 228 Points, +164, 20:04 TOI
* Playoff Statistics: 91 Games, 3 Goals, 19 Assists, 22 Points, +4, 22:47 TOI
* Minnesota Wild Captain (2006)

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08-06-2011, 07:24 AM
  #193
tony d
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Time to bio my #1 defenseman, Garry Galley:



Some facts about Galley:

- 2 Time NHL All Star
- 600 Career Points in 1149 Games
- A Career High of 60 Assists in 1993-1994

Here's what Legends of Hockey has to say about him:

Quote:
Not many fifth-round draft choices taken 100th overall in the NHL Entry Draft reach the level of success attained by defenseman Garry Galley during what turned out to be a 1,149-game career, spanning 17 years.

Galley was selected by the Los Angeles Kings in the 1993 Draft while starring for Bowling Green University in the NCAA. He received many accolades during his collegiate career including being named to the 1984 NCAA East First All-Star Team as well as the 1984 NCAA Championship All Tournament Team after leading Bowling Green to the NCAA title.

In 1984-85 he turned pro with the Kings and earned a roster spot after a strong training camp. He played in 78 games for L.A., scoring eight goals and 38 points in his rookie season. Midway through the 1986-87 season Galley was traded to the Washington Capitals where he played until signing with the Boston Bruins as a free agent in the summer of 1988. He remained in a Bruins' uniform for close to three years and helped the team reach the 1990 Stanley Cup finals where they were defeated by the Edmonton Oilers for the second time in three years.

Midway through the 1992-93 season Galley found himself playing for his fourth NHL team when the Bruins sent him to the Philadelphia Flyers. In his two full seasons with the club, Galley posted his best offensive numbers, scoring 62 and 70 points, respectively. However, he was traded again in April 1995 to the Buffalo Sabres for defenseman Petr Svoboda. He stayed with the Sabres through the 1996-97 season and then returned to the Los Angeles Kings as a free agent in the fall of 1997. During his second go-round with the Kings Galley stayed for three years before signing with the New York Islanders in 2000. He played one season on Long Island before announcing his retirement, finishing his career with 125 goals and 600 points.
Galley will be the offensive force on my defense, really glad to have gotten him.

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08-06-2011, 07:33 AM
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My captain, Brad Marsh:



Part 1 of a bio on the Flyers site about Marsh:

Quote:
Philadelphia sports fans have always valued hard-working players. A blue-collar player who wears his heart on his sleeve often gains fan acceptance and approval faster than a seemingly detached player with greater talent. No one better embodied the type of lunch pail player Flyers fans love more than defenseman Brad Marsh.

Marsh was not blessed with great natural talent and there was nothing fancy about the way he played. He possessed neither dynamic puckhandling skills nor a fearsome shot. It would be an understatement to say he was not a smooth skater. But through sheer determination, he became one of the most popular and successful defensemen to ever wear the Orange and Black. He played in 1,086 NHL regular season games (514 with the Flyers), registering a mere 23 goals and 198 points but posting a career plus-57 defensive rating. For his Flyers career, he was plus-99.

Philadelphia fans identified with "Marshy" because his love of the game was obvious and he worked his tail off to overcome his limitations. Marsh learned to use his considerable cunning and size to their full advantage. The 6'3'', 220-pound blueliner was absolutely fearless when it came to blocking shots. One of the last helmetless players in the National Hockey League, Marsh willingly put his body on the line every night to help his team win.

Marsh was also a solid positional defenseman who took away the corners from opposing forwards. Marsh rarely lost track of his check or got caught out of position. His lack of foot speed was rarely a factor, because his checks spent most of their time trying in vain to prevent being ridden off the play or else lost the puck to Marsh's long reach.

"Brad was a very important leader on our team. Marshy was all about the team and never for himself," says longtime teammate Mark Howe. "He could play 20-plus minutes a game and could always be counted on to compete each and every night. He was a great shot blocker and a rugged competitor on the ice, but a gentle and kind person off the ice. Brad was always smiling and loved to be at the rink each and every day. For many years he was a mainstay on the blueline for our team and a big reason why the Flyers had a successful and competitive team in the eighties."

Off the ice, Marsh's friendly, down-to-earth nature won him admiration from fans and teammates alike. His locker was a frequent stop for reporters. Marsh could always be counted on to provide articulate and honest insight. There may have been scores of players with more natural talent but precious few who were more respected.

Doing the Dirty Work

Charles Bradley Marsh was born in London, Ontario, on March 31, 1958. Taller than the other kids, it took Brad awhile to grow into his body. From a young age, he was encouraged to play defense. His younger brother, Paul, later played defense in the minor leagues.

Even as at the midget hockey level, Brad realized that he would probably not be the next Bobby Orr. He won over his coaches with hard work and aggressive play. As his body began to fill out, Marsh became a solid bodychecker who willingly did the dirty work of blocking shots, clearing out traffic around the net and killing penalties.

"I had to work hard to be on any team that I played for," Marsh said in The Greatest Players and Moments of the Philadelphia Flyers. "People called me a throwback player, because they said the old-time players gave so much every game. But I felt that was something that came natural to me."

Marsh played his junior hockey for the London Knights of the OMJHL. Although he never topped eight goals in a season, he made himself into one of the best junior defensemen in Canada. A member of Team Canada's silver-medal winning 1977 World Junior Championships and 1978 bronze-medal winning teams, Brad shared the Max Kaminsky Trophy with future NHLer Rob Ramage as the OMJHL's best defenseman in 1977-78.

Playing hockey at home in London had its advantages. Brad's family members were able to attend many of his games, and he fondly recalls meeting up with his parents after games to go out to eat and talk over the game. An above-average student with a wide circle of friends, Brad attended Westminster Secondary School in London. While in school, he played for the lacrosse team.

In his final junior hockey season for the Knights, Marsh posted 63 points and 192 penalty minutes while playing in 62 games. In the playoffs, he added 12 points in 11 tilts. More importantly, he took care of business in his own of the ice and displayed an unusually sharp acumen for blocking shots.

"Shot blocking was an individual thing. No coach ever demanded it from me. It was something that came naturally to me, but it wasn't always easy," he said in Greatest Players. "Sometimes I would go down and make the block and it was great. But when I missed, I looked like a bum out there. I never had much time to do much thinking about it. I had to react right away."

The Hockey News ranked Marsh as the eighth best draft prospect for the 1978 NHL Entry Draft. When the Atlanta Flames turn came up with the eleventh pick, they chose the strapping young defenseman from the London Knights.

"My first reaction was - where's that and what's the name of their hockey team? But once I got down there all of my doubts soon changed," Marsh wrote on his business's website, marshys.com.

Anonymity in Atlanta

Marsh bypassed the minor leagues and joined the Flames for the 1978-79 season. Dressing in every game, he posted 19 points (all assists) and a solid +23 rating. He won team honors for rookie of the year and best defenseman.

The Flames were an underrated team that had the misfortune of playing in the Patrick Division with the powerhouse Islanders and Flyers, as well as Fred Shero's New York Rangers.

Atlanta's 90-point campaign that year made them one of the best last-place teams in NHL history. In any other division but the Patrick, Atlanta would have been no lower than second-place and would have won the Smythe Division.

"Atlanta was great place to play hockey although the fans were not that knowledgeable – they were very loud and boisterous," Marsh wrote on his site. "The one drawback about playing hockey in Atlanta was that hockey was the fourth major sport – some said that it even ranked below high school football and bowling – and the recognition that should come along with playing in the NHL was never there."

The Flames, backstopped by fiery goalie Dan Bouchard and led by high scoring Guy Chouinard and Bob MacMillan, were a tough opponent for any club. In the 79 playoffs, the Flames were upset in two straight games by the Toronto Maple Leafs in the best-of-three mini-series. After the season, Marsh joined Team Canada at the 1979 IIHF World Championships. The Canadians finished fourth.

The next year, the Patrick Division expanded to five teams, as the Washington Capitals were moved into the division. Atlanta, hurt by several key injuries, finished in fourth place, 33 points behind a Flyers team that set a North American professional sports record with a 35-game unbeaten streak.

Marsh scored his first two NHL goals in his sophomore campaign and once again suited up in all 80 games, but was not satisfied with his season overall. The Flames were inconsistent. With the club struggling to draw fans at the gate, the team drew national publicity by rushing goaltender Jim Craig into the net shortly after the 1980 Olympics.

Craig, of course, was one of the biggest Team USA heroes in the Miracle on Ice gold medal run in Lake Placid. He won his first game, 4-1, over Colorado in what Marsh later recalled for the most reporters he ever saw crowded around one player after a game.

"No one wanted to talk to the rest of us, but we understood why," he later recalled. "It was all about what Jim did in Lake Placid, not the Atlanta Flames. With a lot of the people there that night, it was probably the first NHL game they ever saw. We all hoped it would be a good thing for hockey."

But the media hordes quickly dwindled and after four starts it was apparent Craig was a marginal NHL goaltender. Bouchard quickly reclaimed his job. The Flames lost to the Rangers in the first round of the 1980 playoffs. After the season, the team was sold and relocated from Atlanta to Calgary.

Young Leader

The atmosphere in Calgary was decidedly different than the one it Atlanta. The people of Calgary were thrilled to have an NHL team. Still playing in the Patrick Division, the Flames now faced a brutal travel schedule to play road games against their northeastern U.S. divisional rivals, but Marsh loved living and playing in the western Canadian hockey hotbed.

"Overnight we went from nobody knowing who we were to the toast of the town being recognized everywhere we went," Marsh wrote on his site. "That first year in Calgary was very exciting."

While they struggled on the road during the regular season, the Flames were almost unbeatable in Calgary, losing just five times on home ice the entire season. Calgary finished in third place in the Patrick with 92 points, five points behind the Flyers and 18 off the pace from the defending Stanley Cup champion Islanders.

By now, the 22-year-old Marsh emerged as a key leader for the club, donning the C as the Flames' team captain. For the third straight year, he played in every game, scoring one goal with 12 assists. In the playoffs, the Flames finally broke their first-round jinx, sweeping the Chicago Blackhawks.

In the next round, the Flames met up with the Flyers. The series went the full seven games. When the Flames dropped a game six decision on home ice by a 3-2 score, most observers felt the Flyers would easily go on to win the seventh game in Philadelphia. As with many visiting teams, the Philadelphia Spectrum was often a house of horrors for the Flames.

While Calgary managed a 5-4 win in game two the Spectrum earlier in the series, they were also blanked 4-0 in game one and pummeled 9-4 in the fifth game. But to their credit, the Flames outplayed the Flyers for virtually the entire 60 minutes. Calgary cashed in on a Flyers too-many-men-on-the-ice penalty in the first minute of the game and never looked back.

Marsh and defensive partner Phil Russell logged heavy minutes protecting a 4-1 lead. Goaltender Pat Riggin took care of the rest.

"That was a big accomplishment for us, to win in the Spectrum," said Marsh. "It was tough to go into Philly and win a regular season game, much less to win game seven in the playoffs."

The Flames magical ride in the 1981 playoffs ended in a six-game semifinal defeat at the hands of the Minnesota North Stars. But Marsh looked forward to a long, prosperous future in Calgary.

The 1981-82 season started poorly for the Flames. Beset with injuries and unable to sneak up on rival teams anymore, the club struggled for the first month and a half. As often happens with defensive defensemen on losing teams, Marsh's plus-minus rating suffered. He was minus-16 through the first 17 games of the season. The adoring Calgary fans quickly turned surly.

"Those same hockey fans who loved us the year before sure turned on us in an awful hurry," Marsh recalled. "They soon became your typical sports fan – trade this guy, trade that guy, ship them all back to Atlanta."

Meanwhile, the Flyers had problems on defense but had a deep core of forwards. Marsh's steady, physical play against the Flyers in the playoffs had made a lasting impression on Flyers' management. On Memorial Day 1981, Calgary and the Flyers announced a straight-up trade of team captains. Tough two-way center Mel Bridgman went to the Flames, while Marsh came to Philadelphia.

"I was very upset at the news but little did I know…" Marsh writes. "I've said many times that the trade to Philly was the best thing ever to happen to me. Why? Because I learned the true meaning of the term 'work ethic.' I always thought that I was working hard but it wasn't until I was a Flyer that I learned the true meaning – commitment and dedication plus-plus."

A Wall of Defense

For the next eight years, Brad Marsh would call Philadelphia home. While Mark Howe (and to a lesser extent, Brad McCrimmon) was the undisputed king of the Flyers blueline in the 1980s, the team also relied heavily on Marsh, both on and off the ice. His durability and consistency made him a Flyers mainstay.

"Brad was a very good teammate on and off the ice. He was always working 100 percent and he hardly ever missed a game," said Ilkka Sinisalo.

Marsh wasted no time making his presence felt with the Flyers. He was in the Flyers' starting lineup within 24 hours of the trade with the Flames. He blocked six shots and was named second star of the game in a 5-3 win over the Hartford Whalers. Right before Thanksgiving, he set an NHL single-game career best with three points (all assists) and earned third-star honors in a 6-3 win over Toronto.

On December 3, he gained a measure of satisfaction as the Flyers downed his former Flames teammates 6-1. Marsh, who got into it with Willi Plett and earned 10 penalty minutes, also got an assist in the game. Later in the season , on February 27, the Flyers won a wild 9-8 game over the Flames. Marsh scored his first goal as a Flyer late in the third period to win the game.

The durable Marsh went on to dress in every game the Flyers played – combined with his games for the Flames before the trade, he played 83 regular season matches that year. It didn't matter if he were sore or bruised or if he had just taken stitches. It didn't matter if the opponent was the woeful Colorado Rockies or the mighty Islanders. He played, and played courageously. His coaches and teammates noticed.

"Marshy came to play every single night," says longtime teammate Dave Poulin, who made his Flyers debut late in the 1982-83 season. "What was understated was his leadership role both on and off the ice. He was an enormous positive factor in many young players'' careers."

The Flyers lost to the Rangers in the first round of the 1982 playoffs. Needing to bolster the blueline, the Flyers made separate trades for Mark Howe and Brad McCrimmon and drafted 30-year-old Czech national team defenseman Miroslav "Cookie" Dvorak. Dvorak had permission from the communist Czechoslovakian government to play in the NHL in exchange for financial considerations for the Czechoslovakian hockey federation.

Marshy and Cookie

Dvorak spoke little English (and none when he first arrived) but he and Marsh hit it off immediately, becoming close friends as well as defensive partners. Marsh bought a Czech-English dictionary and took the player under his wing off the ice. During his Flyers career, Marsh also went the extra mile for many younger Flyers, including Murray Craven, who lived at Marsh's house during his first season in Philadelphia.

"I remember the first time I met Miro at the airport," Marsh recalled in Greatest Players. "I shook his hand and he didn't know a word of English. That night, we roomed together after an exhibition game. I knew how to say 'beer' in Czech (pivo). So I ordered up some beers from room service. With my dictionary, it was amazing what I could accomplish over a couple of beers."

Marsh and Dvorak made quite a second defensive pair behind Howe and Glen Cochrane for Bob McCammon's 1982-83 Flyers. The chain-smoking, beer guzzling Dvorak was also a very solid two-way defenseman, who was able to adapt quickly to the smaller NHL rink and more physical style. The stay-at-home Marsh posted a plus-20 rating (with 13 points), while the more offensive minded Dvorak had 37 points and a plus-27.

"Dvorak lived close to me, so I got in the habit of picking him up on the way to practice. I did a lot of things for him, but I wouldn't have done them if I didn't like him. In time, he became one of my closest friends."

Marsh's consecutive game streak in the NHL was snapped when he suffered a knee injury and a fractured fibula. After playing in 68 regular season games, he missed the first game of the '83 playoffs before returning for the final two games of a disappointing first-round loss to the Rangers.

The next year, Marsh had 17 points and a plus-24 rating (Dvorak had 31 points and a plus-20) to once again provide crucial support behind Howe's pair. Marsh, in fact, won the Barry Ashbee Trophy that season, awarded to the Flyers' best defenseman.

But the Flyers once again lost in the first round of playoffs – this time to the Capitals – costing McCammon his job as coach and general manager. "Iron" Mike Keenan stepped behind the bench.
Legends Of Hockey:

Quote:
There is likely no one who enjoyed playing hockey as much as Brad Marsh. A first-round draft choice of the Atlanta Flames in 1978, he joined the ranks of NHL players that fall, playing all 80 games with the Flames that season. When Atlanta relocated to Calgary for 1980-81, Marsh went with the team up to Alberta and stayed there until he was traded to Philadelphia for Mel Bridgman in November 1981.

Marsh was an exuberant Flyer until the completion of the 1987-88 season. He was picked up by the Maple Leafs in the waiver draft preceding the 1988-89 season. He quickly became a fan favourite. What he lacked in polish, he made up for in enthusiasm. His skating style, almost running on his skates, was awkward, but it got him efficiently from place to place. In a league of conformity, Brad Marsh was one of the last NHL skaters to play without a helmet.

In February 1991, Toronto gave up on Marsh, and he was sent to Detroit in return for an eighth-round draft pick. The Leafs reacquired him in June 1992, but he never played with Toronto this time around, instead, being sent to the Ottawa Senators. But Marsh's popularity never dimmed in Canada's capital, either, and after playing 1992-93 with the Senators, his final season in the NHL, he opened his own bar/restaurant in Ottawa's Corel Centre. Called 'Marshy's,' it is jammed on game nights both before and after Senators' games.

Brad Marsh also had the honour of watching his sweater number retired by the London Knights, the last amateur club with which the popular defenseman played. Brad Marsh will be remembered for his zest for the game of hockey. He certainly won't be recalled as a sniper. Through 1,086 NHL games, Brad Marsh scored a total of 23 goals--a pace of one every 47 games played. Brad Marsh was not blessed with a natural talent to play hockey. But he was born with a strong physique and a copious supply of determination and willingness to work hard. He put those attributes to work, spending four seasons with the London Knights where, in his final campaign, he picked up 63 points and 192 penalty minutes in 62 games. His offensive output and his gritty play set him up as the Atlanta Flames first-round pick of the 1978 Amateur Draft.

Marsh made the jump straight into the NHL and quickly established himself as an honest, lunch-pail defenseman who entertained adoring fans with his likable personality and playing style. He lasted with the Flames until after they moved to Calgary when, in 1982, he was dispatched to Philadelphia.

With the Flyers, Marsh found a stylistic home where, for more than six seasons, he relished his role as a plodding, stay-at-home crease-clearer who helped his team make it to the Stanley Cup finals in 1985 and 1987. The only sour note of his career was the fact that his club fell short of the Grail on both occasions.

In 1988, Marsh joined the Maple Leafs for two-and-a-half entertaining seasons before closing out his career with stints in Detroit and, finally, Ottawa, where he racked up one final, life-long memory. He was selected to represent the Senators at the 1993 All-Star game in which he scored a goal.

In retirement, Marsh stayed on with the Sens' organization to work as the club's Director of Team and Business Development.
From the moment I picked Marsh I knew he would be my captain, pure defense only defenseman is defined by Brad Marsh.

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08-06-2011, 11:56 AM
  #195
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Assistant Captain #1 for the Dragons, Ted Hampson:



Some facts on Hampson:

- 2-Top 10's in Assists for a NHL Season
- 1 Time All Star
- 1969 Masterston Trophy Winner
- 353 Points in 676 NHL Games

This from Legends Of Hockey:

Quote:
Centre Ted Hampson got his first taste of major junior A hockey playing two games for the Flin Flon Bombers in the 1954 Memorial Cup playoffs. He spent four full seasons with the Bombers and was a member of two other Memorial Cup participants in 1956 and 1957.

The New York Rangers were in possession of Hampson's NHL playing rights, when the Toronto Maple Leafs acquired those rights after he was placed on waivers in 1959. In 1959-60, Hampson dressed for 41 games with the Leafs, scoring two goals and ten points. In the summer of 1960, the Rangers had obviously felt they made a mistake in releasing Hampson, and re-acquired him from Toronto in the Intra League Draft. After three years in a defensive checking role with the Rangers, he was taken by Detroit in the 1963 Intra League Draft by Detroit.

Hampson also made NHL stops in Oakland and Minnesota before trying his hand in the WHA, joining the Michigan-Baltimore Stags in 1972-73. He also played three years for the Minnesota Fighting Saints and one year with the Quebec Nordiques. What he lacked in size, he more than made up for with quickness and agility on the ice, making him the perfect hound for checking other teams top offensive threats.

Hampson wound down his career in the CHL with Oklahoma City, retiring after appearing in six games in 1980-81. Known throughout his entire career for his defensive capabilities, the one season that stood out from an offensive point of view was in 1968-69 when he set career highs with 26 goals, 49 assists and 75 points while skating for the Oakland Seals.
Hampson was not even on my radar when this draft started but the more I read on him the more I liked him, think he, Boll and Larouche give me a good first line.

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08-06-2011, 11:51 PM
  #196
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Coach - Bobby Kromm

Quote:
Originally Posted by BC Hockey Hall of Fame
Whether he was on the ice or behind the bench, Bobby Kromm was the picture of excellent during a career that spanned 30 years and four leagues.

Bobby Kromm's success as a coach was evident even before his playing days were over. He was the playing coach of the Trail Smoke Eaters from 1959 to 1963, leading to the team to the World Hockey Championship in 1961. He also coached the Smokies to the 1962 Allan Cup championship in 1962, and earned Trail the right to represent Canada at the 1963 World Championships.

From the Western International Hockey League, Kromm moved to the Central Hockey League, where he coached the Dallas Black Hawks from 1967 to 1975, leading the Black Hawks to the league championship series six times, winning in three times. He was named the CHL's coach of the year in 1972.

A move up to the World Hockey Association followed in 1975, as Kromm coached the Winnipeg Jets from 1975-1977, leading the team to the Avco Cup WHA championship during his first season. He was also named the league's coach of the year that season. Kromm reached the National Hockey League in 1977, when he was named the head coach of the Detroit Red Wings. He was the bench boss of the Red Wings until 1980, coaching a total of 231 games in the NHL and earning coach of the year honours in 1978.

With a world hockey championship, CHL and WHA titles and three Coach of the Year awards to his credit, Bobby Kromm was marked for success at every level.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Kromm is not a name modern fans may know. He was the NHL's Coach of the Year back in 1978 after revitalizing the horrendous Detroit Red Wings.

Kromm went on to coach in the minor pro leagues for years, most notably with the Chicago Blackhawks' farm team in Dallas where he twice won CHL championships and made the final two other times. He stayed buried in Dallas for nearly a decade, earning top coach honors in 1972, as the Blackhawks promised him one day he would coach in the NHL. Kromm even turned down offers form the Atlanta Flames and Washington Capitals to be loyal to the Chicago organization that never fulfilled its promise to promote him.

In 1975 Kromm jumped to the World Hockey Association and became coach of Bobby Hull's Winnipeg Jets. In a dream season Kromm captured the Avco Cup and became the championship coach in his first year in the major leagues. He even outdistanced Jacques Demers as WHA coach of the year.

He would coach the Jets for one more year before taking the job in Detroit. The Jets actually wanted to give Kromm their general manager job, too, but the fiercely loyal Kromm refused to take Rudy Pilous' job. Pilous was the man who had hired Kromm, and Kromm refused to take his job when the Jets fired him.

Kromm meanwhile used an escape clause in his contract to jump to Detroit. The Wings finished second in 1978 and Kromm was voted coach of the year, with Don Cherry at Boston second in the balloting and Scotty Bowman at Montreal third. The Wings not only made the playoffs, but escaped the first round by beating Atlanta before bowing out to the defending Stanley Cup champions from Montreal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Biggest Book of Hockey Trivia
Kromm's “think defense” team strategy worked well in both the NHL and WHA. Although the Jets possessed great firepower, built around finesse players such as Bobby Hull, Kromm believed that “teams that give up the fewest goals usually claim first place more often than teams that score the most goals.” And based on that strategy, he whittled the Jets' goals-against numbers down from 293 to 254 goals in 1974-75, their championship year. Then, in Detroit, Kromm took the cellar-dwelling Red Wings to second place in the Norris Division, while reducing the team's goals-against total from 309 to 266 in 1977-78, the year he won the Jack Adams Award.
Accomplishments
* Jack Adams Trophy (1978) Detroit Red Wings, head coach
* Jake Milford Trophy (1972) Dallas Blackhawks, head coach
* WHA Coach of the Year (1976) Winnipeg Jets, head coach
* WHA Championship (1976) Winnipeg Jets, head coach
* Canada Cup (1976) Team Canada, assistant coach
* CHL Championships (1969, 1972, 1974) Dallas Blackhawks, head coach
* World Championship Gold (1961) Trail Smoke Eaters, head coach
* CHL Record: 283-220-77 (Made Finals 6 out of 8 seasons as a coach)
* WHA Record: 98-59-4 (Made Finals both seasons as a coach)
* NHL Record: 81-118-40 (Including a playoff appearance where he took the head of a horrid Wings team)

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08-07-2011, 12:16 AM
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Coach - Brian Kilrea

Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenTrade Expo
After ending his playing career, Kilrea began coaching minor hockey in Ottawa. He first made a name for himself when his Ottawa West Midget AA team defeated a touring Soviet squad, the only loss by the Soviets on their tour.

This caught the attention of the OHL major junior Ottawa 67's owners and they soon offered him a coaching job, replacing XXX XXXXX. He began coaching the 67's at the start of the 1974-75 season.

He would continue in that role until 1984, when he became an assistant coach with the defending Stanley Cup champion New York Islanders of the NHL. However, after two seasons, he would return to coaching the 67's.

XXXX XXXXXX – head coach of the Sarnia Sting – who played for Kilrea says Kilrea would have players over to his house at Christmas… but that when you were in his 'dog house,' it was often tough to get out.

Except for a brief retirement for the 1994-95 season, Kilrea coached the 67's until the end of the 2008-09 season, and is also the General Manager of the club. His teams won the Memorial Cup, emblematic of Canada's major junior champion-
ship in 1984 and 1999, and he's recognized as the ‘winningest’ coach in junior hockey history when his team won game 742 on January 17, 1997. Kilrea coached game 2,000 as head coach of the 67's on February 2, 2007.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Brian Kilrea is a legend in the hockey world. He is a veteran of just 26 NHL games but is best known as the winningest coach in junior hockey history. As the long time coach of the Ottawa 67's, Kilrea has earned over 1200 career wins in the Ontario Hockey League as well as producing countless NHL and minor pro players - names like Bobby Smith, Gary Roberts, XXXX XXXXX and XXXX XXXXX.
Accomplishments
* All-time winningest coach in Canadian Hockey League history
* 5x OHA/OHL Coach of the Year
* 2x CHL Coach of the Year
* Memorial Cup Winners: 1984, 1999
* OHL Championships: 1977, 1984, 2001
* OHA/OHL Coaching Record: 1214-815-159-39

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08-07-2011, 03:07 PM
  #198
Iain Fyffe
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Tom “Atty” Howard, LW/RW

Although frequently referred to as A.T. Howard (possibly as a way to explain his nickname of “Atty”), Howard's full name was Thomas Acheson Howard. “Atty” is in fact short for Acheson, his middle name; this is similar to Mickey MacKay, whose given name was Duncan but whose nickname derives from his middle name of McMillan. Biographical information on Atty Howard was limited until a couple of years ago, when I was able to track down one of his descendants.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Winnipeg Free Press 2/18/1899 (but bio written by a Montreal paper)
Howard was one of the first young Winnipeggers to become interested in the game of hockey. He has chased the gutta percha for seven or eight winters now, and is in consequence, a player of more than ordinary skill. He is a speedy forward and an unerring shot on goal, being able to shoot from almost any position and when going at full speed. Howard delighted in those long shots from the side such as our own [undrafted] and (Graham) Drinkwater are in the habit of making.
This bio is correct; when the very first game of hockey between two organized clubs was played in Winnipeg in 1891, Howard was one of the players. It's remarkable that a mere five seasons later, the Winnipeg Vics became perennial Stanley Cup contenders, with Howard one of the prime contributors. He scored three goals in three Stanley Cup matches, winning the storied trophy in 1896. In his nine years with the Vics, he led the team in goals once and assists four times. Of the Vics who played before 1900, only the team's goaltender played more games with the senior side than Howard. He played primarily wing (both left and right), but also played rover and cover-point at times as well.

He might be better known today had he not moved to New York for employment reasons after the 1899 season. But he then proceeded to star for the New York Athletic Club in the AAHL, primarily as a cover-point, which suggests good defensive skills. He led that league in assists once while playing a defensive position, and was one of several Canadian stars in that league. In the end he played 16 seasons of senior-level hockey, a remarkable total for a player from that era.


Mike Cammalleri, RW/LW

Quote:
Originally Posted by thehockeynews.com
Shoots the puck with aplomb, has excellent offensive skills and a nose for the net. Plays with intelligence and is usually in the right place at the right time.
In the regular season, Cammalleri's best year was undoubtedly 2008/09, when he was ninth in the NHL in goals and 13th in points. He placed sixth in the All-Star voting among LW (and also received a single vote at RW).

However he might be best known for leading the NHL in playoff goals in 2009/10, scoring 13 times in just 19 games. He followed that up with an impressive 10 playoff points in 7 games the following season, bringing his career playoff numbers to 32 points in 32 games, compared to 384 in 496 in the regular-season. If playoff performers really exist, it seems he is one.

Before establishing himself as an NHL regular, Cammalleri finished second in AHL scoring in 2004/05 with 109 points and led the league with 46 goals. This was the NHL strike season, when several young players who would otherwise have been in the NHL played there instead. Cammie finished second to Jason Spezza in points and on the All-Star team, making it as the second All-Star centre.


Steamer Maxwell, Coach

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey.net
Maxwell moved on to coaching and was the bench boss of the Winnipeg Falcons in 1920, winning both the Allan Cup and an Olympic gold medal that year. In 1925-26, he coached the Winnipeg Rangers to the Manitoba championship and in 1926-27 he coached the Winnipeg Maroons of the AHA, signing future-great Johnny Gottselig to his first professional contract.
By 1929-30, Maxwell was coaching the Elmwood Millionaires to both the junior and senior Manitoba championships and in 1931-32 he coached the Winnipeg Monarchs to the Memorial Cup finals, losing to the Sudbury Cub Wolves. He had been offered the coaching position with the Toronto Maple Leafs prior to the start of the year but later believed that he didn't get the post because of his demand for a lucrative and guaranteed three-year contract. The Leafs subsequently hired Dick Irvin to the post.
Maxwell's international coaching career continued in 1933-34 with the Winnipeg Monarchs; as his team won the Manitoba championships and, representing Canada, went on to win the 1935 World Championships at Davos, Switzerland.
Maxwell is a Hall of Fame coach. I say this because he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1962 as a player, but his senior career in Winnipeg was quite short and despite playing rover, never came anywhere near leading his league in scoring. His subsequent career as a coach must have had a hugh influence on his induction, since his playing career ended 47 years before his induction.
Maxwell's role on the Shamrocks is to be a go-between for Bob Pulford, a modern coach, and the many olde-tyme players on the Brandon roster. As assistant coach, his job will be to ease the historic players into a more modern way of playing the game, as set out by Pulford.


Aaron Broten, LW/C

I'm not going to say much about Broten. In all honesty he's a space-filler on the team, selected as much to fulfill an era requirement as anything else. A decent checker, can play two positions, will spend most of his time with the Shamrocks in the pressbox.

Quote:
Originally Posted by legendsofhockey.net
Aaron Broten was a solid two-way forward who played over 700 games in the 80s and 90s. Comfortable at centre and left wing, he registered three 20-goal seasons and was effective on both specialty teams.

Bob Pulford, Coach

Bob Pulford coached 829 NHL games for the Kings and Blackhawks, his first at age 36 and his last at 63. Pulford was a key to the Los Angeles Kings becoming a team to be reckoned with in the NHL:

Quote:
Originally Posted by kings.nhl.com
Bob Pulford spent five seasons as the Kings head coach (1972-77). Pulford is second all-time in Kings coaching history in games (396) and wins (178) and is third in Kings history with a .535 winning percentage. Pulford is the only Kings coach to ever win the Jack Adams award (1975), awarded to the NHL's Best Coach.

In Pulford's first year with the Kings (1972-73), the team was named “Most Improved” in the NHL and missed the playoffs in the last game of the season. His second year, the Kings made the playoffs for the first time in five years. His third year, the Kings had their greatest season ever finishing with 105 points and earning Pulford “Coach of the Year” honors. His fourth year, the Kings advanced to the second round of the playoffs for the first time in seven years and took heavily favored Boston to a seventh game in the Stanley Cup Quarterfinals. In his final year, the Kings again advanced to the Stanley Cup Quarterfinals and again, fell to the Boston Bruins, this time in six games.
Pulford was very organized and had specific plans for how he wanted his team to operate. For a Brandon Shamrocks team with more offensive talent than defence, this will be key:
Quote:
Originally Posted by kings.nhl.com
One coaching colleague called it ``the Bible.'' It was written by a young hand, but one who felt he knew what the Kings needed, and decided to put it all down on paper.

Bob Pulford was only 36 years old when he took over as coach of the Kings, but he had seen enough to know that things needed to change, on and off the ice. The Kings hadn't been a playoff team -- and hadn't totaled more than 63 points -- for three seasons when Pulford made the transition from player to coach before the 1972-73 season.

Within three years, Pulford had set the Kings on a new course, guiding them to a franchise-best 105 points in 1974-75, a record that still stands today.

Perhaps, somewhere, someone still has a dog-eared copy of the pamphlet Pulford took to Kings owner Jack Kent Cooke upon his hiring as coach almost 40 years ago.

``I put it all on paper,'' Pulford said. ``I wrote it all out, what I thought had to be done and how I thought it should be done, and I gave it to Cooke. It was a little book on how I thought hockey should be played, and the changes I thought had to be made.

``There was discipline involved in it. How do you discipline? What do you do? There were systems in there. How to win faceoffs, where to position defensive players, offensive plays, and then there was just basic philosophy of how to coach a hockey team and what was needed, all aspects of it.''
When Pulford took over the Blackhawks in 1977, he took a 63-point team and turned them into an 83-point team. Similarly, when he took over the team again in midseason 1984/85, the team was .443 and they produced a .667 winning percentage for Pulford. In 1999/2000 he again took over the team in midseason, and they jumped from .292 to .534 under his guidance.

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Old
08-07-2011, 03:21 PM
  #199
Iain Fyffe
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This is as good a place as any for this, so I'll post it here. It's a defence of the quality of hockey in Tom Paton's era (pre-1893), demonstrating that it should be considered on par with the era immediately after the introduction of the Stanley Cup, 1893 to say 1900. A number of undrafted players are mentioned by name, but this is absolutely necessary in a discussion of this era, and since the draft is now over it should not create problems.

THE QUALITY OF PRE-STANLEY CUP HOCKEY

Hockey from the mid-1880s to 1892 was not substantially different than hockey immediately after the introduction of the Stanley Cup in 1893. The dividing line between 1892 and 1893 is as artificial and political as the line between 1917 and 1918. As such, players from the pre-Stanley Cup era should be considered to be on par with players post-1892, at least until the professional era.

Several arguments were previously raised in an attempt to demonstrate that a relatively low level of competition existed prior to 1893. Each of these arguments will be refuted in turn.

The Nature of the Game and its Players

It was argued that hockey before 1893 was a gentlemanly game, played more for its own sake than for the competition. It was played by affluent young men, members of posh clubs. This allegedly began to change when the Cup was introduced, which gave the teams something real to strive for, and increased their incentive to do anything it takes to win.

This argument stems from the misconception that hockey before the Stanley Cup was a game played between teams from gentleman's clubs. This is false; the clubs in question were athletic clubs (such as the famous Montreal Amateur Athletic Association, who sponsored the Montreal Hockey Club). Members of these clubs joined them to undertake sport, not to assemble in the drawing room for dry sherry.

Violence has been a part of the game of hockey since its earliest years of organized competition. The players on the ice were rarely gentlemen. The following excerpts are taken from Montreal Herald game reports from the 1890 AHAC season, which of course predates the Stanley Cup by three years.

Montreal vs Quebec, 1/9/1890: The game was rather rough at times and it is regrettable to say that one of the home players forgot himself so far as to strike one of the visitors. The visitors, to their credit be it said, even when fighting against odds, stuck to their work with a commendable spirit and never seemed to lose courage.

Montreal vs Victorias, 1/17/1890: The Montreal teams gained a victory over their opponents, the Victorias, but the victory was not as clean a one as might be desired. There were three men on the winning side who resorted to very rough play. During certain stages of the game there was a good exposition of the game, but at other times there was a good deal of tripping, swiping, falls and wholesale dumping against the bank.

Campbell took charge of [the puck] and piloted it through several of his opponents, but his shot for goal was wide. Immediately after this Findlay and Kinghorn lost their temper and made an undesirable display of themselves on the ice to the disasprobation of the audience. This seemed to have the effect of making the remaining portion of the game rougher than it should have been.

Montreal vs Dominions, 1/31/1890: During certain stages of the game there was a good deal of ill temper shown by members of both teams...The match was fast, exciting, and at times a trifle rougher than was necessary.

Montrealvs Victorias, 3/4/1890: The match throughout was hard and fast and not of the easiest kind to describe. The puck was here, there and every where. It travelled fast and was not allowed to remain long in one place. There was a good deal of hacking and shinning, but this was not confined to one individual of one side, both taking a hand in it. The only regrettable feature of the match was the ill-feeling shown by Lee and McQuisten, who had a dispute and commenced to settle it with their fists. They both fell to the ice and had to be separated. They received a sharp reprimand from the referee. Later on Lee meet with an accident whereby he sustained a severe cut over the right eye.

In four of the seven match reports from this season, the writer felt the need to point out unnecessary violence in the game. The idea that hockey at this time was a group of gentleman playing a friendly game is simply false. Rough play was common, and as indicated in the above reports, fistfights happened occasionally as well. This only makes sense if the players were taking the competition very seriously, and were doing whatever they thought was needed for victory.

As to the alleged affluence of the players involved in the game at this time, this is certainly more difficult to determine that the above, since a hockey player's off-ice life was not often recorded for posterity. However in Win, Tie or Wrangle we get some background on a number of Ottawa players, for instance:

Albert Morel, G, 1891-1894: The son of a cabinetmaker, Morel was a student when he first joined the hockey club, and later worked as a private secretary and a bookkeeper for a lumber company.

Weldy Young, CP, 1891-1899: The son of a fire superintendant, he worked as an engraver in a watchmaking business tun by him and his two brothers.

Chauncey Kirby, C, 1891-1899: The son of a city treasurer, worked as a clerk at the Quebec Bank.

Bert Russell, LW, 1893-1896: Worked as a draughtsman for the Geological Survey.

Although there may be a tendency toward white collar work, none of these descriptions seem to indicate a particularly affluent lifestyle. Indeed, the player best described as affluent from the early days of Ottawa hockey would be Frank McGee, who didn't play senior hockey until 1903. McGee came from one of Ottawa's most prominent families, growing up in the “magnificent home” of his father, who was the clerk of the Privy Council, the highest-ranking civil service office in Canada. He worked as a timekeeper for the railroad, but it is certainly fair to say he came from an affluent family. However, he played at a time when the game was supposed to be becoming more serious, due to the Stanley Cup.

Similarly, census records can give us some insight into what players did for a living at a time when they didn't receive a penny for playing hockey. The following players all played at the highest level, prior to the introduction of the Stanley Cup. This is what the 1891 census lists their professions as:

Barlow, Billy - clerk
Bignell, Herbert - insurance clerk
Clapperton, Alexander - dry goods clerk
Cafferty, Thomas - lithographer
Davidson, Robert - grocery clerk
Fairbairn, William - insurance clerk
Hodgson, Archie - whale stationer
James, George - hardware clerk
Kinghorn, James - mill clerk
Larmouth, F.M. - brokerage clerk
Lee, Sam - trunkmaker
Lesser, Joshua - agent
Low, George - bank clerk
McDonnell, John - photographer
Routh, Havilland - clerk
Shearer, Andy - lumber merchant
Warden, William - bank clerk

Again, there does seem to be a tendency toward white-collar jobs, but unless “grocery clerk” or “hardware clerk” implies “affluent” to you, then there's no reason to think these men were particularly well-off in society, members of restrictive upper-crust social clubs.

Something to Play For

Related to the above, it was argued that before the Stanley Cup, teams did not have anything to play for. As such they treated the game more as a pastime than a competition.

This argument is false. The first AHAC season was in 1887, and the association named a champion at the end of each season. Before the AHAC was formed, the Montreal Winter Carnival (which started in 1883) served to determine the champion team for the season. When the Carnival was cancelled in 1886, the teams decided to hold a tournament amongst themselves to determine a champion.

Just because the Stanley Cup was not there did not mean there was no championship to be won. The Stanley Cup is viewed as the be-all and end-all in hockey by modern eyes, but that was simply not the case in its early years. It was highly prized, but other championships were important as well. In 1901, the Ottawa team, new champions of the CAHL, declined to challenge Winnipeg for the Stanley Cup even though they would have had at least an even shot of taking it. They had just won a hard battle for the league championship, and decided that was enough for them; the Stanley Cup was not worth it that year.

If anything should be viewed as giving teams something to play for, it should be the Winter Carnival Tournament. It was that event that really sparked the growth of competition in Montreal, and led directly to the establishment of the Ottawa Hockey Club.

The first excerpted game report above provides a quote about how the Quebec team never lost courage even in the face of unfavourable odds against them. This is not the description of a team out for a skate. Courage is not needed when undertaking a pastime. This is a team doing their utmost to win out against their opponents, trying even when it seemed the game had already been lost.

Player Turnover

It was argued that since few pre-Stanley Cup players continued to play in the post-Stanley Cup years, this demonstrates a significant increase in the quality of competition. Players who played before were allegedly now unable to compete.

This argument misses a very basic fact about hockey at the time: almost all players had very short careers, by modern standards. As players got into their late 20s, family and other responsibilities often came into play, meaning they had less time to devote to getting their shins whacked by sturdy pieces of wood. This trend continued into the early professional era. Here are some notable players from this era, and the age at which they played their last senior-level game:

Havilland Routh - 25
Billy Barlow - 26
Mike Grant - 28
Graham Drinkwater - 24
Bob McDougall - 22
Clare McKerrow - 22
Fred Scanlan - 25
Harry Trihey - 23
Art Farrell - 24
Frank McGee - 23
Blair Russel - 27
Herb Jordan - 26
Marty Walsh - 27
Russell Bowie - 27

With players retiring so early, it is unsurprising that few of them would be in the same league in X number of years, since they have so few years in their career to begin with. As such, even if few players who were playing in 1890 are still playing in 1895, this does not mean the quality of competition necessarily increased, because the same can be said for 1895 compared to 1900.

To demonstrate this, I examined several pairs of seasons. For each season, I noted which regular players (ie, those playing at least half of their team's games) were still regular players five seasons later. I did this in two-year intervals. The results are below.

1888 to 1893 - 7 players (Hodgson, McQuisten, McDonnell, Cameron, Stewart, Paton, Patton)
1890 to 1895 - 5 players (Cameron, Brown, Watson, Davidson, Jones)
1892 to 1897 - 4 players (Brown, Scott, Young, Watson)
1894 to 1899 - 8 players (Kirby, Watson, Young, Brown, Elliott, Grant, Collins, Stocking)
1896 to 1901 - 4 players (Stocking, Westwick, Cahill, Pulford)
1898 to 1903 - 2 players (Westwick, Pulford)
1900 to 1905 - 5 players (Bowie, Russel, Hogan, Boon, Pulford)

The average number of players is five, and there is no pattern here. Therefore the observed player turnover after the Stanley Cup came into play was merely the normal amount of player turnover for this era. This rate continued on after the Cup was introduced.

Hall of Fame, or the Lack Thereof

It was argued that if the players from the pre-Stanley Cup era were so good, then at least a few of them would have been inducted into the Hall of Fame. The selection committee usually had first-hand knowledge of the players they inducted, and didn't deem any player from this time worthy of the honour.

This appeal to authority is flawed, since the Hall of Fame selection committee has made numerous selections, even its early years, which can be described as questionable at best. The first Hall of Fame induction was in 1945, 62 years after the first Winter Carnival tournament. The idea that the committee had first-hand knowledge of early players is unsupportable. The first selection committee was made up of the following men:

Red Dutton (born 1898)
Art Ross (born 1886)
Lester Patrick (born 1883)
Abbie Coo (born 1885)
Wes McKnight (born 1909)
Basil O'Meara (botn 1892)
W. A Hewitt (Born 1875)

In addition, there were Frank Sargent and J.P. Fitzgerald, whose birth years are unsure. Clearly there is little evidence that the committee would have had first-hand knowledge of players active in 1890, some weren't even born yet and several others were but a few years old at the time. There is no reason to think these men had any particular insight into the earliest players.

The only one we know to be old enough, W.A. Hewitt, was a native of Toronto and began his newspaper career in 1895 at the Toronto News. Toronto was of course not involved in the highest level of hockey at this time. Notably, he transferred to Montreal to work at the Montreal Herald as sports editor in 1899, when Mike Grant was still active and Graham Drinkwater had only just retired. He would have had no direct experience with Tom Paton, then, but plenty with Mike Grant.

Conclusion

Since hockey in the 1880s era was so similar to the 1890s era, it is unfair to discount its players while not doing the same for men like Mike Grant, Graham Drinkwater, Alf Smith and Harvey Pulford as well. An argument can be made that the professional era brought a higher degree of competition; however the point of this discussion is merely to establish that there is no substantive difference between hockey in 1890 and hockey in 1895. If the players from 1895 (Drinkwater, Grant, Havilland Routh, Bob McDougall) are worthy of consideration, then so are the players from 1890. There may be a discount necessary, but not moreso for 1890 than 1895.

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Old
08-07-2011, 11:00 PM
  #200
seventieslord
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Billy Harris, C



- 6'0", 155 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1962, 1963, 1964)
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1959, 1960)
- Calder Cup (1965, 1967)
- 18th & 25th in points (1958, 1959)
- Best percentages by seventies method: 57, 55, 48, 43, 40
- 12th, 17th, 26th, 27th in ES points
- Best ES percentages: 65, 59, 58, 54, 45

Not the greatest defensive player, just a "two-way" guy. Not the most popular guy with his coaches, but loved by fans and players.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
Billy was a dependable two-way centre..
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Tall and thin, "Hinky" was a good skater and stickhandler, a real heady player. Early on he was counted on in an offensive role, but by the end of 1950s he would become a 3rd line utility player. Part of this was because he was a bit of a whipping boy for coach Punch Imlach. But the biggest reason was the incredible depth at center ice the Leafs enjoyed by the 1960s - Dave Keon and Red Kelly were undeniably the team's top two centers.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1961 hockey card
Harris, though light, is a durable player who has missed only 10 games in six seasons. He is not a high scorer, but is an excellent stickhandler and makes openings for his two wings… He is very popular with both his teammates and opponents.
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1960 hockey card
Harris is one of the headiest and smoothest centres around. His main trouble is his lack of weight... he is a fine stickhandler and playmaker.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cbc.ca
Pat Quinn will never forget Billy Harris... Quinn, in his first NHL game in 1968 with the Leafs, tried to run Harris through the boards.

The big defenceman missed the cagey forward, who was playing for the Pittsburgh Penguins in the last of his 13 NHL seasons.

"He gave me that old inside-out move and went in and scored a goal," Quinn recalled while reminiscing Thursday after learning Harris had died earlier in the day.

"(Coach) Punch Imlach really gave it to me so I didn't like Billy Harris at the time."
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Leafs: An Anecdotal History
"I know I was kind of special to Stafford." Harris explained. "Seventeen years I played for him, and that meant something to both of us. Stafford knew I didn't have a father. Maybe that was the reason he was extra good to me. Whatever specialness Staff felt for Harris entered crucially into Harris' career two weeks after Punch Imlach took the leaf coaching job in 1958.

"I gotta do something about this team," Imlach said to Staff. "Gotta move some people. One trade for sure is Billy Harris to the Rangers. I got it all lined up."

" Trade Billy Harris!?" Staff went ballistic. "You don't trade Billy Harris! Every team he's played on for me, we've won championships. Harris stays."

"It was difficult playing seven years for punch knowing he didn't want me on the team." What was it in Harris that turned punch off? Maybe Harris' hockey style. "He didn't think I shot enough. I never had much confidence in my shot. Used it as a last resort if I couldn't find a teammate in a better scoring position. The thing was I got as big a thrill out of setting up a goal as scoring one."

Or maybe Imlach wasn't as hot on Harris' personal style. Harris was working on a BA at the U of T mainly through correspondence, and later on he was an early wearer of a hockey helmet. An intellectual and a sissy? For all punch knew, Harris might be quiche eater.

"On the other hand, he could have been one step ahead of me and everyone else," Harris said, thinking back. "He didn't play me often, so I felt motivated to play better whenever I got on the ice. Maybe that's where he was counting on. Once when he was hurt, I played five games and scored seven goals. Three were game winners. And in the Stanley Cup finals against Detroit in 1964, I played on a line with Keon and we scored two goals in the sixth game, two more in the seventh. Maybe Imlach knew what he was doing with me."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple leafs top 100
a smooth skater and nifty puck handler, Harris had a style that was popular with the leaf fans right from the start of his Pro career. The leafs hoped Harris could take over from Ted Kennedy at center, but that was a little beyond his reach.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toronto Maple Leafs: Diary of a Dynasty 1957 – 1967
punch Imlach said "we had tremendous center men. We had Pulford, Kelly and Keon. Hinky could have been a starter on any other team. He was a great little hockey player. He was an excellent skater and he had maneuverability. Unfortunately, when that team started to win hockey games, you just couldn't take one of those three guys out.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toronto Maple Leafs: Diary of a Dynasty 1957 – 1967
Thursday, December 17, 1959: during and eight – two trouncing at the hands of the Canadiens, a brawl broke out during the second period. It began when the leafs Billy Harris jostled Plante. Both benches emptied, and everyone except Johnny Bower paired off and exchanged punches.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toronto Maple Leafs: Diary of a Dynasty 1957 – 1967
Harris was regarded as hockey's best pinch-hitter. In spite of abundant skills, he was a center on a team, with Dave Keon, Red Kelly and Bob Pulford playing the same position. "Even though I realize punch thinks of those three before he gets to me, when he's considering centers, I still feel there are times when I could spell off Keon, Kelly or Pulford, especially if they have been killing a penalty, "Billy stated. Imlach admitted that he felt Harris was a defensive liability and Not rugged enough to play regularly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ultimate A-Z Guide of Everyone Who Has Ever Played in the NHL
over the years they were greater leafs, leafs who scored more goals or one markups or who were more popular. But never was there a more devoted man to the team and the game, a man whose passion for hockey kept him in Toronto for much of his career and also shot him around the world… A devoted man of the game, Harris had no enemies.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Young: The Leafs I Knew
Billy Harris, as anyone knows, skates like a wisp of mist. As a result, any defensemen who catches him generally likes to hang on for a while. This often is simple curiosity; much of the matter of a butterfly collector slowly and intently opening his hand to see what he is cocked. Anyway, Harris got tangled up tonight with Bill Gadsby, the gentleman defenseman for the Rangers. When they came out of it, Gadsby was very cross with Harris. You could tell this plainly from the stands, especially if you are a lip reader. I went to Harris. What had he had Gadsby been jawing about?

"He said I was kicking him!" Harris said indignantly. "He had my leg in between has I couldn't get loose! I told him I wasn't kicking him, I was just trying to get my leg loose!"

What did Gadsby say to that?

"He said that if I kick him again he would break his ******* stick over my head!"

"So what did you do that?" I asked.

Harris thought for a few seconds and then laughed. "Well, for one thing," he said, "I stopped kicking him."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Young: The Leafs I Knew
Toronto Maple Leafs program 1959: Billy Harris. A shadow on skates.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Young: The Leafs I Knew
It is interesting to watch Imlach cope. He dropped Kelly to defense with Baun and moved Harris to centre between Mahovlich and Nevin. Harris responded with some beautiful playmaking.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lowering the Boom
, the kid who caught everyone's eye at training camp was Billy Harris. Red Burnett of the Toronto Star said that Harris "fits between Sid Smith and Eric Nesterenko like corned beef with rye. "
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorthanded: The Untold Story of the Seals
in the rough-and-tumble world of professional hockey, the word "gentleman" is not frequently used when discussing most hockey players. However, gentleman is the word overwhelmingly used to describe Billy Harris. It was clear that Harris was respected by his teammates both as a hockey player and as a man.

In Toronto, Harris had been an extra forward and a power play specialist. (Editors note: not true.) Somehow, the Toronto native always seem to find a way to score important goals for the leafs. Harris described himself as "an average goalscorer but a good playmaker. Punch Imlach said I was a liability defensively, but I always was something like a +15 on the plus minus chart.

Although Harris weighed only 157 pounds dripping wet, he was able to become an effective NHL player in the original six era… Harris admitted that the transition to playing for the Seals was tough on him. "It was different for me. I grew up in Toronto. I didn't need a pep talk or to be motivated if I had a blue-and-white sweater on. Oakland was not a hockey climate. The atmosphere was different – I had to give myself a pep talk. It was a big challenge."

There were other factors that made the 1968 season difficult for Billy Harris. First among them was his relationship with coach and former Maple leafs teammate Bert Olmstead. For whatever reason, Harris became Olmstead's whipping boy. "As a teammate, Bert and I got along very well. As a coach, he challenged me on many occasions. I told him many times that if I were as good as he thought I should be at age 33, then I wouldn't be on an expansion team."

Bob Baun remembers how hard Olmstead was on Billy Harris. "All Bert could see was Billy Harris's weaknesses. He was light, but a heady hockey player. He scored goals and got assists when you needed them. He just needed a little pat on the back, though, and in Oakland, he didn't get it." Rookie Tracy Pratt added: "it was hard for Billy to swallow being treated that way by an ex-teammate."

Harris tried to explain the issues he had with Olmstead: "that was the first time Bert was an NHL coach and he was very demanding. When Bert played in the NHL, nobody work harder. He couldn't understand why everybody else didn't apply themselves like he did. Or didn't understand the player could be tired.… Were pointed fingers at different players over the course of the season but, deep down, I think he blamed himself."
Quote:
Originally Posted by the Windsor Star, April 13, 1962
Center Billy Harris, a bench player who has been popping emergency goals all season
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa citizen, November 15, 1962
Billy Harris, the idol of many a Toronto Maple Leafs fan, is working his way into punch Imlach's heart. He showed why again Wednesday night.

The stage was set. Toronto led 3 to 2. Montréal Canadiens had control of the puck in the Leafs zone. Jacques Plante was halfway from the Canadiens net and to the bench to be replaced by an extra forward. Then Harris entered the picture. Plante scooted back to his net, but the lanky, stickhandling center culminated his rush up the boards by neatly outfoxing the Montréal netminder to score and give Toronto a 4-2 victory... All of last season – and for much of the previous part of his seven-year professional hockey career – Harris was kept around as a spare man. Imlach didn't heed the reaction of the fans who applauded Harris almost every time he appeared on the ice. For the last few games, Imlach has put Harris between wingers Bobby Pulford and Ron Stewart, and now the 6 foot center is tied the center Dave Keon for most points by leafs this season. Both have 13. "He would keep the job as long as the line is producing like this," Imlach said after Wednesday night's game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saskatoon star Phoenix, January 3, 1963
for years there has been a special spot reserved on the Toronto Maple Leafs bench for Billy Harris, and for weeks at a time he seldom got off it until this NHL season. Chances are that he is again going to assume – part time, at least – the role of benchwarmer deluxe. Given the regular job this season at center between wingers Bob Pulford and Ron Stewart, Harris had been going great guns until a few games back. "Now he's sagging," said leafs general manager – coach punch Imlach.

And that has been the story of the 6 foot center, a nifty stickhandler and playmaker, almost since his professional career began. Used strictly as a spare man to replace injured centers, Harris plays brilliantly. Last season the 27-year-old Toronto native played only 18 full games, with the occasional ice shift in several others. He finished the season with 15 goals and 10 assists. "He's great coming off the bench," Imlach says. "But now he's getting tired. Benched? Well, that depends on the terminology you want to use. Just like Eddie shack, if Harris goes well he'll keep a regular job. But he sags after a while. Just look back at the last few seasons and you can see that. As a matter of fact, just look back at our last few games."

The interpretation of Imlach's remarks might go something like this: I'll use Harris now it again for a few games, maybe even for a whole game, and when he can keep up his pace again he'll have his job back. Many hockey observers figure the big trouble with Harris is weight. There are only 157 pounds spread around his 6 foot frame. Toronto center Dave Keon him is only 5 foot nine, yet he weighs 6 pounds more. So in a tight checking game where the bodychecks are flying, such as the leafs had against Chicago Blackhawks last weekend, Harris often spends much of his ice time on the seat of his pants. Imlach used him for the first. That game, then put converted winger Ed Litzenberger in his place. Harris is a better center, but Litzenberger, at 6 foot four, has 194 pounds and more stamina. And the Harris fans – and Toronto has more than its share of them – need not give up heart. "He'll be back," says Imlach. Just how soon and for how long depends on the coaches whims and Harris's endurance.
Harris was notoriously light:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toronto Maple Leafs: Diary of a Dynasty 1957 – 1967
" I was playing quite a bit and my weight would fluctuate between 158 and 164, and Imlach wanted me up as close to 170 pounds as possible once every two weeks, he had a case of Stout delivered to our house in East York. He wanted me to have a bottle of stout prior to every meal, hoping to put on some weight. The project was successful. I pretty well played between 165 and 170 pounds the last couple of years I played in the NHL. In fact, for a while, Bobby Haggart, our trainer, had to weigh me in before practice and if I wasn't 160 or more, I wasn't allowed to practice."
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Young: The Leafs I Knew
all the fit players claimed that they had added many much-needed pounds. Billy Harris, indeed, seems to have gained so much weight that he will almost be visible on a clear day, although once or twice, to be sure, he was to be seen surreptitiously blowing up his muscles with a bicycle pump.
Apparently the ladies liked Harris too:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Young: The Leafs I Knew
many a gloomy glance followed Armstrong at this point as he headed for the dressing room, and many a wife said brightly, "well, anyway, now maybe Billy Harris will get to play," and many a husband said, "aw, Shaddap," or "yes, dear," depending on how well his wife had brought him up.

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