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Old
08-07-2011, 11:35 PM
  #201
chaosrevolver
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C/D - Skene Ronan

Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander
Ronan is an X-factor, as the extra skater was a star dman who switched to center and led the NHA in scoring in 1911-12 over the likes of Didier Pitre, Ernie Russell and Joe Malone with an incredible 38 goals in 18 games. He went on to three other top-10 season finishes in goals and a Stanley Cup. Expect to see him dress for a few games this series.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Birthplace of the NHL
Playing both forward and defence, Erskine "Skene" Ronan was only a Renfrew Millionaire for one season as a defenceman.

Although it was only for a short time, he joined the ranks of other hockey greats like Newsy Lalonde, Cyclone Taylor and the brothers Odie and Sprague Cleghorn wearing the Renfrew jersey.

Ronan, like many of the Millionaires, was quickly signed up by another professional team when the O'Brien's closed their franchise. In 1912 he went to play for the Ottawa Senators as a forward, and became a top scorer in the league, with 35 goals in 18 games.

He went on to play for the Canadiens, and was part of the team when they won the Stanley Cup in 1916. He also played seasons with the Montreal Shamrocks in 1915, and the Toronto Arenas.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Canadian Mining Journal
Skene Ronan and Louis Berlinquette—the latter two hockeyists of professional fame..
Quote:
Originally Posted by Habs Eyes on the Prize
That there was little to choose between the teams is best shown by the score of the final meeting. The Canadiens scored their first goal in the opening session, it coming from Ronan, another of the club's substitutes who has also made good in the series.
Accomplishments
* Stanley Cup (1916) -- Had a goal in the series clincher too.
* Retro Hart Trophy Winner (1916)
* Led NHA in Scoring (1912) -- Over players like Joe Malone, Didier Pitre and Ernie Russell
* Four Top-10 Finishes in Goals
* NHA Statistics: 108 Games, 104 Goals

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08-07-2011, 11:42 PM
  #202
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RW - George Ferguson

Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1980
People in Toronto will tell you one reason for Leafs; slid last season was loss of honest workers such as Ferguson, an excellent penalty killer and backchecking forward... has good speed, strength and size but lacks scoring touch... used quickness to better advantage last season... can play center or wing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1981
has good speed and strength but offensive output has never matched physical ability... plays both center and wing... a good defensive player and penalty killer...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1982
tireless checker... superb defensive forward and excellent skater... not a crushing checker but gets the job done... popular with the fans.
Accomplishments
- Was 10th in 1982 selke voting
- Scored a very respectable 398 points in 797 games in career from 1974-1984
- Had six 43+ point seasons
- One of the all-time leading playoff forwards available, with an excellent 86 games and 37 points; only missed the playoffs in his rookie season.
- Killed 38% of his team's penalties, his teams were about 4% below average on the PK
- 0.36 adjusted ESPPG
- three players have higher adjusted ESPPG and killed a higher % of penalties, but he has at 300-400 more GP than all of them
- most importantly, he demonstrated longevity. 797 games isn't much nowadays, but it sure is for a guy whose career started in 1973. To illustrate: There are 80 available players with 700+ games post-expansion. The top-26, with 800+ games, all played past 1995. Ferguson's the first player on the list to show up who wasn't a part of that era, playing until only 1984. There are just 9 other players in that top-80 who didn't play until 1995, and none of them were as valuable offensively or defensively as Ferguson.

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08-08-2011, 12:19 AM
  #203
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C - Vyacheslav Anisin

Quote:
Originally Posted by International Hockey Legends
Vyacheslav Anisin was by most accounts a "typical Soviet center." He was very solid offensive player who specialized in orchestrating beautiful plays rather than finishing them off. He had incredible balance and was very hard to knock off of the puck, despite his tiny size at just 5'9" and 168 pounds.

Anisin was the key player on the Soviets "Kid Line" that shocked Team Canada in game three of the 1972 Summit Series. As with most Soviet lines, the center is the key to every lines' success, even though it isn't often the "glamour position."

Anisin, who actually debuted in game 2 and unlike his linemates played in 7 out of 8 games (compared to just 3 for Bodunov and Lebedev), directly set up both Lebedev's and Bodunov's second period goals. Anisin's centering pass from the corner that set up Bodunov's tying goal was particularly brilliant.

Anisin also had a big impact in game five, which was the opening game in Moscow.. His goal, assisted by Yakushev and Yuri Liapkin, came in the third period with the Soviets down 4 to 1. His goal ignited an unthinkable comeback featuring four unanswered goals to give the Soviets an impressive 5-4 win. Anisin also set up Vladimir Shadrin's goal just 8 seconds after his own tally.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chidlovski
Anisin's line brought this overall unspectacular club the championship in 1974 and became the top scoring “troyka” of the season. A slick passer and skater, Anisin was a gifted playmaker setting up many goals by his crafty wings.
Accomplishments
* USSR Gold: 1968, 1970, 1971, 1974, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981
* WC Gold: 1973, 1974, 1975
* Scoring Leader in 1974
* RSL Statistics for 1972-1980: 319 Games, 131 Goals, 148 Assists, 279 Points
* WC Career Stats: 14 Goals, 16 Assists in 33 Games

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Old
08-08-2011, 01:08 AM
  #204
seventieslord
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Darcy, Tucker, F



- 5'10", 178 lbs lbs
- played 3 seasons as C, 5 seasons as RW, 5 seasons as LW
- Best percentages by seventies method: 66, 54, 50, 40, 39, 38, 37
- Best ES percentages: 80, 58, 52, 42, 39, 39
- 101 NHL Fights (36-25-20 record as recorded by dropyourgloves.com)
- Average opponent was 3" taller and 25 lbs heavier than him
- Killed 18% of penalties for his teams in his career

Quote:
Originally Posted by wikipedia
In 2009, Sports Illustrated also compiled their own list of "Notable Pests of the NHL". Their list was: Claude Lemieux, Matt Cooke, Ian Laperrière, Darcy Tucker, Theo Fleury, Pat Verbeek, Esa Tikkanen, Ken Linseman and Tiger Williams. (editor's note: plus six undrafteds)
Quote:
Originally Posted by defendingbigd.com
TSN recently aired a top-ten show featuring the best agitators in NHL history... For some perspective, the top ten was (in order from ten to one): Eddie Shack, Darcy Tucker (9), Dale Hunter, Billy Smith, Claude Lemieux, ***** , Ken Linsemen, *****, Bryan Watson, and ****** .
Quote:
Originally Posted by canoe.ca
here are the best NHL players ever to have insulted mommas and hacked ankles en route to agitator infamy.

9. Darcy Tucker Slapped with the derogatory nickname Sideshow Bob, Tucker transformed from a smallish, skilled player into a shift disturber over the course of his NHL career. It was during his long tenure with the Leafs that Tucker perfected his act. Tucker made a (four-letter) name for himself as an agitator with his incessant chatter. His season-ending low-bridge hit on Islanders forward Michael Peca in the 2002 playoffs simply added to his notoriety.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Leaf Legends
the only reason he wasn't drafted higher was concerned about his size. The scouts didn't measure the largeness of his heart… About the only thing the fans knew about Tucker was that he feuded with Toronto winger Steve Thomas: soon they would be cheering him for his reckless style and the grit he added to the club. … He scored 16 times in 2001, but was getting into far too much trouble with the referees and racked up 141 penalty minutes, many of them needless. To be fair, Tucker was concerned with protecting his teammates and brother-in-law Shane Corson on the ice and at times he seriously lacked discipline. He was strong in the playoffs in a checking role and helped the leafs nearly get past the New Jersey Devils… Tucker returned to Toronto for the 2002 season with the new approach. Gone was the mouthing off to officials and the overreactions on the ice. He still used his body as much as ever, but he realized he could be more effective if he stayed out of the penalty box and his total fell to 92 min. He scored a career-high 24 goals and 59 points, and displayed a touch around goal few had expected. Tucker's intensity was as high as ever and he still lost control on occasion – at the time a hit on Washington defenseman Sergei Gonchar cost him a two-game suspension – but for the most part he stuck to hockey. He was at his most intense in the 2002 playoffs, fighting like a tiger through a hit from behind by Daniel Alfredsson... It injured his shoulder so that he missed three games and played hurt when he returned. A more mature Tucker had now become a very valuable member of the Toronto Maple Leafs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maple Leafs Top-100
when the Maple leafs acquired Darcy Tucker from the Tampa Bay Lightning they were hoping he would bring an edge to their hockey team… Tucker already had a reputation for being one of the top antagonists in the NHL, and he enjoyed that recognition. "I love going into a rink and being the most hated guy on the ice. Who wouldn't?"

"He has a real edge to him," Toronto coach Pat Quinn said of the newest leaf. "He's a great competitor who will sacrifice his body. You need those kinds of guys, and we didn't have enough of them."

... "You have to evolve with the game, and I think I've adapted fairly well to the new rules and the way the game is being called now," Tucker said when asked if he is now more about skill and less about Brawn. "I think Don Cherry said it well. When I play with a certain edge, that's when I play my best. I go out there and play hard and I play with a tenacious effort. Sometimes that makes other people angry. I just go out and play."

Buffalo coach Lindy Ruff, a longtime Tucker hater, found nice words to say about the lease left-winger. "Right now, he's a goalscorer. You have to give him credit. It might surprise some, but he is a key piece to their offensive puzzle."
Quote:
Originally Posted by THN, October 1, 2010
NHL players don't have to worry about pesky forward Darcy Tucker getting under their skin any longer.

The 35-year-old announced his retirement Friday after 15 seasons in the NHL. One of the game's most notorious agitators in his prime, Tucker acknowledged that his game had changed a little in recent years.
"I was pretty gentle near the end of my career," said Tucker. "I don't think any of those young guys quite realized what I was like when I was in the heyday. ...

"It's a good time to step back."

Even though Tucker spent his last two years in a Colorado Avalanche jersey, it's the seven-plus seasons with the Toronto Maple Leafs he'll best be remembered for.

Tucker arrived via trade from Tampa Bay in February 2000 and almost instantly became a fan favourite. He was a fierce competitor who played with a reckless style that belied his small stature—occasionally crossing the line.

After arriving in Toronto, the five-foot-10, 178-pound winger provided a noticeable shot of adrenaline.
"When I got there, they were looking for some grit and a certain style of player," said Tucker. "It seemed to work out well for both of us."

Tucker had a career-best 28 goals and 61 points during the 2005-06 season with the Leafs. He also had 100 penalty minutes. The native of Castor, Alta., ended up playing 947 career NHL games in all—amassing 215 goals and 476 points for Montreal, Tampa, Toronto and Colorado. Those are impressive numbers for a player many felt wouldn't be able to make the jump from junior scoring star to everyday NHLer.

..."I played the game hard throughout my career," said Tucker. "When you play as hard as I did for the number of years, things start to slow down—the foot speed, everything. It becomes difficult to ramp yourself up to the level that you need to get to. I was a competitor throughout my career and I want to be known as that."

Ultimately, it was his body that told him it was time to go. "I'd say there's still bumps and bruises that are still lingering," said Tucker. "That's just part of being an NHLer."
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 1996 – 97
fearless… An intelligent playmaker with a first-rate work ethic and sound defensive skills, he still needs to get stronger…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 1996-97
Great character...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1996-97
a rugged player who bangs and grinds, Tucker is a workaholic. Despite the lack of blinding speed, he accomplishes a lot with pure determination. He is smart with the puck. He knows when to pass and went to shoot. He has great enthusiasm, which he uses to inspire his mates. Tucker's lack of size could get him in trouble if he doesn't learn to play with a bit more restraint. He has been compared to a small dog who thinks he's a mastiff, taking on anyone and everyone. The Habs love Tucker's enthusiasm and grit. He's a hard worker, and his winning track record is no accident.

WILL - bring top attitude
CAN'T - win with speed
EXPECT - grit, determination
DON'T EXPECT - Lady Byng approach
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 1997-98
if he sticks at the NHL level it will be as a get-under-your-skin agitator. Tucker is overzealous and takes bad penalties instead of drawing them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1998-99
some people are calling Tucker the new Dale Hunter, and that's not a bad comparison. Tucker isn't the street punk that Hunter is, but he brings a level of intensity to his game that supplements his talent… Tucker was a scorer in Junior and the minors, but his scoring doesn't translate to the NHL level. What it does do, though, is give him an offense of awareness that enhances his role as a third line checking center. Tucker's major drawback is that he lacks big-league speed. He is a good forechecker who will hound the puck carrier, and he can do something with the puck once it's on his stick.

Tucker is dogged and enjoys the rough going. He is small but highly annoying to play against. He can distract bigger players who just try to squish him. His efforts are pretty consistent – you don't have to worry about him getting jazzed up to play a big game. Tucker's got spunk. He cares. He's been a winner and he wants to make his team better.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sports Forecaster 1999 – 2000
Tucker was the bolts leading scorer last season. His league worst -34 was more a reflection of how bad the team was, not an indictment of Tucker's play. Will miss not having Wendel Clark around, but the emergence of LeCavalier and an improved Chris Gratton will take pressure off him offensively. Not a great skater, but a coach's dream because of his work ethic. He will continue to fill the role of a gritty, checking center...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2000
Tucker managed to lead Tampa Bay in nearly every major offensive category. Considering that Tucker is a third line checking center, this is a major accomplishment… Tucker surpassed all expectations for his production last season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 1999 – 2000
Combative Ex-hab exceeded offensive expectations in his first full year with a lightning… Relentless… Proved very effective deep in the attacking zone but frequently was a liability At the other end… Needs to become a more complete third line pain.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sports Forecaster 2000 – 2001
Tucker is the gritty, two-way forward the leafs needed. Not overly big, he plays a big man's game and has an infectious, in-your-face attitude. While he has seen significant time at left wing, he is an ideal third line center…
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2000 – 2001
belligerent… Made an immediate impact after arriving from Tampa in February and was one of the few useful forwards against New Jersey in the playoffs despite playing with an undisclosed wrist injury… A fiery competitor with good finishing skills, he crashes the net with little regard for his undersized body and has even improved defensively
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2001
what a treat it was for Tucker to get traded to a team that was a playoff contender. He is the perfect kind of player for the postseason, because every night he brings a level of intensity to his game that supplements – and some might suggest, surpasses – his talent… He has decent hands, and a knack for scoring big goals… He is good on draws and will tie up the his opposing center. He will block shots. He will fill the water bottles. Whatever it takes to win, Tucker is there… Tucker was the only leafs forward who showed up against the Devils in the playoffs. This trade was an outright steal for Toronto
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2001 – 2002
Tucker is an undersized pest who plays at full speed all the time. He's an overachiever who brings a little bit of everything to the table. He can kill penalties and, when called upon, can contribute to the power play. However, Tucker is best suited to playing a pivotal role on a checking line. Offensively, he didn't have an effective postseason but was able to contribute with skating and checking prowess… His job will remain that of a checker and shift disturber.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2002
Tucker is a pesky forward with the scoring touch… Tucker is a player who is wasted on a non-playoff team. He's just the kind of role player who needs a specific assignment. Like Claude Lemieux, Tucker is able to take some of the heat off the other players in the room by handling the media attention.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2002 – 2003
Tucker plays every shift as if he's 6 foot three and 210 pounds. In reality, he's 5 foot 11 and 185 pounds soaking wet. The former junior scoring star moved into the high rent district last season, finishing with the second highest points on the Maple leafs and a team-high +24 rating. On the downside, Tucker's on ice antics rubbed everybody the wrong way – at times even his own teammates. He needs to tone it down a notch because it hinders his team performance is much as it helps.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2002 – 2003
rebounded from a poor 2001 season to finish second on the leafs in scoring with a career-high 59 points… Was slowed in the playoffs by a broken bone in his shoulder… A belligerent, all-purpose spark plug with underrated puck skills, Tucker generate scoring chances because of his desire and fearlessness and has continued to refine his once suspect defensive zone play, however, he can slip over the edge at times as he did in the playoffs, wiping out Mike Peca with a cruel low blow… Any toned-down version would be much less effective
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2003
Tucker Is the Kind of Player to Keep No Matter What His Points Are Just to Have on Hand for Pressure Game… Tucker Crossed the Line When He Went from Being an Annoying, Pesky Guy to a Cheap Shot Artist. Maybe the Change Stemmed from Tucker Being on the Receiving End Early in the Season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sports Forecaster 2003 – 2004
Tucker was expected to have difficulty duplicating his 2002 numbers, so last year went true to form. He slumped to 10 goals, his lowest in six years. He did make strides in playing smarter, more disciplined game but is still too much of a loose cannon. He is at his best when given a defined role on the team, something that was lacking in 2003. Don't expect any more career seasons.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2004
it's almost impossible to watch a leafs game and not notice Tucker… Points aren't why teams keep a player like Tucker around
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2005 – 2006
Played Inspired Hockey during the Rebound First Half in 2004, but Was Derailed by Eye Surgery Followed by a Nagging Abdominal Strain That Limited His Playoff Effectiveness and Required Off-Season Surgery… A Fearless, Lightweight Banger and Agitator… Has a Knack for Getting Open and Wins Plenty of board Battles Using His quickness and ferocious competitiveness… Can Also Lose His Composure Though, As He Did in the Playoffs with Sinister Hits against Sami Kapanen and a... An effective two-way factor when focused and disciplined. Vladimir Malakhov
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2006 – 2007
the gritty winger enjoyed a career offense of season with personal bests in goals and points. Tucker also shot the puck more than ever before. Only Sundin produced more goals for Toronto as Tucker benefited from an improved power-play unit to scored 18 goals with the man advantage. He has toned down the post whistle yapping that he was known for but still grates on the opposition.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Sports Forecaster 2007 – 2008
always one of the games best agitators, Tucker has blossomed into a legitimate offensive threat, particularly with the man advantage. With his grit and ability to finish, Tucker gets prime scoring opportunities… His rambunctious style inevitably leads to injuries.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2008 – 2009
as a whole last year, Tucker's play reflected that of his former club, the Maple leafs: he underachieved and was very good. Feisty, Tucker never stops competing.
Quote:
Originally Posted by sports forecaster 2009 – 2010
after Toronto bought him out, Tucker headed west to rejuvenate his career in Colorado. Instead, the gritty winger wound up posting career lows.


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-08-2011 at 11:13 AM.
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Old
08-08-2011, 05:04 AM
  #205
chaosrevolver
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D - Uwe Krupp

Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
The 6'6", 235-pound defenceman was a member of two German league championship teams with the Cologne Sharks (1984 and 1986) and also played for his country at the World Championships of 1986 in Moscow and 1990 in Bern.

Born in Cologne, Krupp was selected by the Buffalo Sabres in the 13th round, 214th overall in the 1983 NHL Entry Draft, and improved rapidly to the point where he represented the Sabres in the 1991 All-Star game. He was traded to the New York Islanders in the fall of 1991, then to the Quebec Nordiques in the summer of 1994. The Nordiques became the Colorado Avalanche in 1995 and in the spring of 1996 Krupp's overtime goal, which earned the Colorado Avalanche a 1-0 win over the Florida Panthers and the 1996 Stanley Cup title, created more excitement in German hockey circles than any event since the West German national team won a bronze medal at the 1976 Olympics in Innsbruck.
Quote:
Originally Posted by APSE
In Germany, Krupp knew a lot about his sport. Or at least he thought he did. But when he arrived in Buffalo later that year, the fall of 1986, his real hockey education began. During training camp, a player took a run at Krupp. Uwe, a defenseman, instinctively sidestepped, letting him pass. When he reached the bench, a teammate yelled, "Uwe, what the hell are you doing? Next time a guy does that, you slam him hard – or you'll never see the end of it."

Krupp did what he was told. He learned to fight. He learned the tough-it-out and keep-your-mouth-shut mentality of hockey. It wasn't his way, perhaps. But it was hardly the last time he would feel out of step with the surrounding culture.

If Krupp's body were a car, he long ago would have exhausted the warranty and the mechanic's patience. He arrived in the NHL, at age 21, still recovering from left ankle reconstruction in Germany. He tore his left anterior cruciate ligament in 1992. In 1993, he took a puck to the head and suffered a fractured sinus bone, which required surgery to reconstruct his forehead.

"They cut you from ear to ear," Krupp says, leaning over to show the effects, "then they fold your skull flesh forward and rebuild with titanium mesh."

He smiles. "I'm the bionic man."

His left knee totally blew out two years later (in the season opener against the Red Wings), and surgery kept him out from October to March of 1996. He rehabbed diligently and came back in time for the playoffs, helping Colorado win its first Stanley Cup. He even scored the Cup-clinching goal, in the third overtime of a 0-0 game against Florida.

That night, he skated with his Avalanche teammates, hoisting the trophy, drinking in the victory.

That night, no one would have doubted Krupp's desire to endure pain to play.

That night was his greatest hockey moment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Road to Hockeytown
Krupp was certainly a physical presence on the ice when he was healthy and in the proper mindset.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Roy: Champion Goalie
...and rangy defenseman Uwe Krupp from Germany.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fish Sticks: The Rise and Fall of the New York Islanders
He ostensibly traded dependable defenseman Uwe Krupp for the rights to draft 18-year-old junior forward XXXX XXXXXX, the younger brother of emerging Flyers star center Eric Lindros.
Accomplishments
* Stanley Cup Champion (1996, 2002)
* Elected to two All-Star Games (1991, 1999 - Did not play due to injury but was voted in as a starter)
* Scored Stanley Cup Winning Goal in 1996
* Regular Season Statistics: 729 Games, 69 Goals, 212 Assists, 281 Points, +97
* Playoff Statistics: 81 Games, 6 Goals, 23 Assists, 29 Points
* National Level Statistics: 7 Games, 2 Goals, 3 Assists, 5 Points
* Inducted into German Hockey Hall of Fame

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08-08-2011, 05:26 AM
  #206
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D - Doug Crossman

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Doug Crossman, a Mike Keenan favorite, was a reliable defender and a great team guy. He was part of both the 1985 and 1987 Philadelphia teams that challenged for the Stanley Cup, and was part of the victorious 1987 Canada Cup team. He would play in over 900 NHL games and scored 464 points. He could move the puck so the fact that he could always find a NHL job on someone's blue line should not be surprising.

There have been few better passers from the back end. He was an outstanding puckhandler and a great breakout passer, able to read the ice and key the transition offense. He'd jump into rushes and pinch at the blue line with great efficiency.

Crossman's career seemed to peak in 1987, with a strong playoff (18 points in 26 games). After a short summer break Keenan included him on Team Canada and he did not look out of place against the extremely quick Soviets.
Accomplishments
* Two 50+ Point Seasons
* Five 40+ Point Seasons
* Named to 1987 Canada Cup Team (along with Bourque, Coffey, Rochefort, Murphy and others..)
* NHL Regular Season Statistics: 914 Games, 105 Goals, 359 Assists, +34
* NHL Playoff Statistics: 97 Games, 12 Goals, 39 Assists, +6

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08-08-2011, 06:06 AM
  #207
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G - Kirk McLean

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends
Utilizing his big size, Captain Kirk was one of the last classic stand up goalies to succeed in the National Hockey League. Canucks radio colour commentator Tom Larscheid described him best: "He's like one of those bubble hockey goalies, always standing perfectly straight and just letting the puck hit him."

His stand up style was ideal for his big frame, although in some ways his style made him unappreciated. While other goalies were acrobatically turning away pucks, "Mac" made all saves look routine by just getting in the way of it and making sure the rebound was under control. To the novice fan it looked routine, even boring, but to the hardcore fan it was a pleasure to watch one of the last great stand up goalies.

One of the coolest customers you'll ever meet, McLean seemed unflappable, even in the early years with Vancouver when the team was extremely weak. He had a tremendous glove hand, which made up for vulnerabilities to the low posts. He also loved to handle the puck, usually in the far corner of the rink in what is now part of the restricted zone. He would almost without fail deke out an oncoming forechecker by faking a puck dump behind the net and around to the other corner, but then pull back with a backhanded flip the other way, usually to a waiting Canucks defenseman.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greatest Hockey Legends on "The Playoffs"
McLean's signature moment came in round one against Calgary. With the team clawing it's way back from a 3 games to 1 deficit, the Canucks forced overtime in game 7. In the extra frame McLean robbed Flames' sniper Robert Reichel with a sliding, pad-stacked toe save that to this day is considered the single most important save of the Canucks history.

But McLean was never better than in game one of the Stanley Cup finals in New York. The Rangers heavily outplayed the underdog Canucks, but McLean, in his classic stand-up style, committed one of the grandest larcenies in the history of Manhattan. His 52 save performance, including 17 in overtime, remains one of the most impressive games I've ever seen a goaltender play. In a game where the Rangers could have blown out the Canucks, McLean kept the score 2-2 into over time where XXXX XXXXX, McLean's trade accompaniant from New Jersey 7 years prior, scored the game winning goal at 19:26 of the first over time.
Accomplishments
* NHL 2nd All-Star Team (1992)
* All-Star Game Participant (1990, 1992)
Vezina Voting Finishes: 2nd (1992, behind Roy), 3rd (1989, behind Roy and Vernon)
* Wins Finishes: 1st (1992), 9th (1995), 10th (1993)
* Goals Against Average Finishes: 3rd (1992), 10th (1989)
* Save Percentage Finishes: 7th (1989), 7th (1992)
* Shutouts Finishes: 1st (1992), 2nd (1989), 6th (1993), 8th (1994)
* NHL Regular Season Statistics: 245-262-72, 3.26 GAA, .887 SV%, 22 SO
* NHL Playoff Statistics: 34-34, 2.84 GAA, .907 SV%, 6 SO

Other Goalies of his Time: Patrick Roy, Dominik Hasek, Ed Belfour, Curtis Joseph, Mike Richter, John Vanbiesbrouck, Grant Fuhr, Mike Vernon, Tom Barrasso

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08-09-2011, 09:04 AM
  #208
Iain Fyffe
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More than a mere offensively defenceman, Risto Siltanen was a solid defender, known as "the Littlest Hulk" due to his strength and relatively small stature.

His NHL offensive production peaked at 10th among defencemen in 1981/82, when he recorded 63 points for the Oilers. The previous season he was 18th with 53 points, and then to prove he wasn't just piggybacking on superior teammates, recorded another 53-point season with Hartford in 1983/84 (17th among blueliners).

In his career in Finland, he was never the best offensive defenceman in the league (3rd in 1989, 4th in 1990, 6th in 1979, 7th in 1977), but he still made three First All-Star Teams (1977, 1989 and 1990).

Legends of Hockey bio.

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08-09-2011, 09:20 AM
  #209
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Patrick Sharp is an energetic second-line goal-scorer, comfortable playing both RW and centre. A Stanley Cup champion with Chicago in 2010 (when he scored 22 points in 22 playoff games and led the league is shots on goal), Sharp can also be used as a penalty-killer, where he uses his speed to good effect. He led the NHL in 2007/08 with 7 SHG despite not being used as a primary penalty-killer.

Sharp finished tied for 8th in the NHL in goals with 34 in 2010/11, and was 13th in the NHL in goals with 36 in 2007/08. Much more a shooter than a playmaker, his peak in points in 21st in 2010/11.

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08-09-2011, 03:45 PM
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Eric Weinrich, D



- 6'1", 215 lbs
- Averaged 21.95 minutes a game for 1157 NHL games for teams with 1.00 GF/GA ratio
- top-3 in total TOI on team 9 times (1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3)
- top-3 in ES TOI on team 10 times (1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 3)
- 5 30+ point seasons
- career adjusted +60
- 34% career PP usage, 37% PK usage
- 10 games for team USA in two best-on-best tournaments
- 18 points in 60 games in 10 other senior international tournaments

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1991-92
Weinrich is a big player who is a finesse defenseman. He is a good skater, with lateral ability, but he needs to develop more strength in his skating to be more of a factor along the boards. He is very quick with his feet, but his balance is terrible. He will bump with a player 30 pounds lighter and he'll be the one to fall down. He needs to learn better technique. He has excellent passing skills and has a promising future as a point man once he starts to read plays better. his shot from the point is good - low, hard and accurate, and he gets it away fairly quickly. What Weinrich can't do yet (because of his lack of skating ability) is get into the offensive flow with any confidence. Weinrich doesn't do anything flashy. He needs to develop a more consistent game, but his future as a solid everyday defenseman doesn't seem far off, if he can raise his skating a notch.

The aerobic part of Weinrich's game is fine; he is in good shape and can skate all day. but he needs to work more on his lower body strength. He is not a fighter, but he does have hockey courage and he will go back at a player, he just won't initiate. Weinrich has fairly good hockey instincts. He is cool under fire and he has learned to take a more commanding role with the puck in his own zone. he rushes the puck well and is learning to do things more smoothly and easily. Weirich doesn't read plays well coming at him, however.

Weinrich is an introspective player who needs frequent reassurance from his coaches. He is gaining condence with experience and is becoming more vocal. he has leadership qualities that will start to emerge more and more in the next season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1992-93
Weinrich's skating improved slightly last year, but not to the point where he could be counted on as a puck-carrying threat. Weinrich has a nice stride and can accelerate quickly, but is not a well-balanced skater and needs to work on more lower-body conditioning. He does not get good power from his legs and needs that strength to help move men out of the slot area. Weinrich's finesse skills are very good, close to excellent. he is a solid passer and also has a good point shot. Weinrich knows when to rifle a shot and when to take a little edge off so that his shot can be tipped in. He has a tendency to get flustered under pressure, however, and had more problems on the point on the power play than you would expect a player of his talent level to show. His defensive play is inconsistent. Weinrich should continue to improve as an offensive contributor, although he will never be in the class of the elite scoring defensemen.

Weinrich does not always play to his size. he lacks meanness, which can be overlooked if he would make takeout checks, but his skating hasn't developed to the point where his checks eliminate an attacker... Weinrich plays a good game in his own zone, where his skating and passing skills come into play to facilitate getting the puck out quickly. he has some trouble reading plays coming at him fast, although he has improved in this area, especially at breaking up two-on-ones.

Confidence still plays a major role in Weinrich's game. he needs reassurance from his coaches. A sophomore season is often a telling one for a player who had a good rookie campaign, as Weinrich did. Although probably the Devils' best defenseman durin the third quarter of the season, he did not distinguish himself in the playoffs...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1993-94
The Whalers paid dearly for Weinrich, and upon his broad shoulders they pinned their hopes for a revitalized, mobilized power play. He has a very hard shot from the point, and is considered a potentially outstanding offensive defenseman. From a skill point of view, he is the team's second-best backliner after Zarley Zalapski. Weinrich has excellent size and strength, and is disciplined enough to play a strong physical game without getting caught up in penalty-ridden rough stuff.

Weirich has been an underachiever, and he is quick to admit that his 1992-93 performance did not accurately represent his abilities. Consistency has been a problem. Some nights he is very good, carrying the puck and firing laser beams. other nights he is lethargic, and ends up riding the pine.

His dilemma is a real one. Should be forego his offensive potential to prioritize defensive play? The Whalers, after all, need all the defensive help they can get, averaging more than 4.5 goals against per night. Or should he do what comes naturally and take the risk of being caught out of position at times? In his defense, he has done a yeoman's job on defense, and has limited offensive forays to those obvious opportunities - that is, not forcing the issue and pressing for scoring chances that don't actually exist.

WILL - stay confident
CAN'T - do it alone
EXPECT - solid offense
DON'T EXPECT - much flash
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1993-94
Weinrich is a package of nice finesse skills, and he is reaching the stage in his career where he has to take the next step forward in his development and become a leader. Weinrich's skating is above average. He accelerates quickly and has good straightaway speed, but he doesn't have great balance for pivots or superior leg drive for power. He's worked to improve his skating but needs to get even better. He is strong on the puck, shooting and passing hard. Weinrich works on the point on the first PP unit and has a low, accurate shot that he gets away quickly. He joins the rush very well. He will not gamble down low but will sometimes sneak into the top of the circle for a one-timer. His offensive reads are much better than his defensive reads.

Weinrich has always played smaller than his size. It might be a case of too much Mr. nice Guy, since he has a very easy-going nature and little desire to crunch people. His lack of balance allows him to be tipped over by smaller players. More lower-body work will serve him well. On some nights, Weinrich will come out and do just as the coaches as physically, but he does not perform on a consistent level.

A message was sent to Weinrich when he was benched for a game after scoring a goal. The message is that the Whalers need him to shine in all three zones and not just in the offensive end. Weinrich needs more mental toughness to become a legitimate #1 or 2 defenseman, but he seems to be thriving on the challenge and improved steadily over the second half of last season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1994-95
Weinrich could be an excellent offensive defenseman, given the right set of circumstances. the Blackhawks get plenty of offense from Chris Chelios, but he plays such a physical game that his penalty time creates a need for a secondary player with similar abilities. Weinrich enjoyed a renaissance upon his arrival in Chicago last year and was on his way to one of his best seasons when he was knocked out for the year with a broken jaw in February.

Inconsistency has been Weinrich's worst enemy. Before arriving in Chicago, Weinrich was developing a strong reputation as an underachiever. The strict discipline of the Chicago system helped him gain confidence in his role and what was expected. Weinrich has always had the talent, he just hasn't been able to bring it all out. Now, it appears he is at the crossroads. Once he has recovered fully from the broken jaw, he has to follow up with another excellent year to prove to the Blackhawks that he is dedicated, and he is willing to do the hard work.

WILL - have a huge year soon
CAN'T - afford any more setbacks
EXPECT - excellent two-way play
DON'T EXPECT - a Norris trophy
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1994-95
Moving to Chicago meant a step forward in Weinrich's development, since he saw a majority of icetime as partner to Chris Chelios. When Weinrich has to carry the mail, he is a less useful player. When the pressure is off and he is playing with a superior defenseman, Weinrich's game comes through. He doesn't have to do anything fancy, just move the puck and move up into the play, and he can do this quite nicely... he is not sturdy on his feet... Weinrich is a good one-on-one defenseman, but he needs to take the body better down low in the crease area. He has always had a high conditioning level and can play a lot of minutes. He is not a soft player (a criticism that dogged him early in his career). Weinrich will fight. it's not in his nature, but he won't get pushed around and will stand up for his teammates. Lower body strength and balance continue to be a weakness... has fragile confidence and needs to play on a good team to play well. he needs a coach to both coddle and cuss him to get the maximum effort. Weinrich is not the kind of player who will make others better, but he is a complementary defenseman.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1995-96
Being paired with Chris Chelios may be the best thing to ever happen to Weinrich...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1995-96
Weinrich is a talented offensive defenseman... Weinrich provides plenty of finesse, which comes in handy if Chelios runs into penalty trouble... last year, he was back on top of his game... some of his past inconsistency could be blamed on playing for weak teams. In Chicago, he has been able to play some of the best hockey of his career because he is part of a strong system. As a role player he can have more of an impact than when he is expected to be a front-runner... nobody has ever questioned his talent, but Weinrich hasn't been able to emerge - until recently, that is. As the Hawks continue to remake themselves, players like Weinrich will play increasingly important roles.

WILL - play a big role
CAN'T - be ignored offensively
EXPECT - finesse play
DON'T EXPECT - Chris Chelios
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1996-97
Weinrich plays better with an offensive-minded partner. He is more useful when he is the support player who can move the puck up and move into the play...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Almanac 1996-97
Weinrich can do everything. He is a talented offensive defenseman, but he's also strong in his own end. The Hawks benefit greatly from his smart puckhandling and skating. He has a good shot from the point. He proved that he was a useful second-unit PP quarterback. Weinrich is well-trained and dedicated to winning... he has not been pressured into a leadership role, but his play speaks for itself... Weinrich doesn't have the personality that requires constant attention from his coaches. He's solid, consistent, and steady. He is one of the game's best all-around backliners, with the talent and toughness to make him the goods.

WILL - give two-way effort
CAN'T - overshadow Chelios
EXPECT - top skills
DON'T EXPECT - many PIM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 1996-97
Has slowed down offensively... a hard-working 5th or 6th defenseman.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 1997-98
Is playing as well as he ever was. Was fifth in assists and 3rd in +/- on team... a solid #3-4 defenseman. A low-maintenance player who quietly does his job. Tough to beat one-on-one. Showed a little more grit last season. A good skater who handles the puck well, he has a quick release and keeps his point shots low. Very well-conditioned. Doesn't have lower-body strength or balance. Not a force in front of his net... he has gotten stronger over the seasons...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1997-98
Weinrich was probably Chicago's most consistent defenseman last season... he's in the shadow of Chelios and Suter, but Weinrich is a fine, underrated number three defenseman... trade rumours always seem to dog Weinrich, but he is well-regarded by Hawks and it would take a pretty good deal to pry him away. After seeming to settle into a comfort zone a year ago, he has taken on more responsibility and become a better player.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 1999-2000
played quite well for the Habs... mobile with decent skills, he logged the most icetime on the club.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1999-2000
A fine, underrated #3-4 defenseman who is perfectly spotted in his current role in Montreal... he jumps into the rush but needs to get his shots through from the point... Weinrich has reached an age where he needs to watch his minutes. When he starts averaging over 17 minutes a game, he starts to break down... his experience with Chelios in Chicago taught him to battle hard, and Weinrich has tried to bring that with him to Montreal... he provides some quiet leadership and is an inspiration, but at 33 might not have that much left in the tank.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool yearbook 2000-01
has missed only eight games in four seasons... Weinrich is the type of player who goes unnoticed by fans, yet is always noticed by coaches. Steady and unspectacular. Excellent in the defensive zone and able to make the first pass. Certainly no offensive force, Weinrich will provide a lot of minutes and a lot of stability.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2000-2001
This fine "Wein" gets better with age. Even though at this stage of his career he is best suited as a #3-4 defenseman, in Montreal, he serves as a top-2 and handles the icetime and responsibility with poise... his composure with the puck in all zones has improved with experience. he is an outstanding penalty killer and shot-blocker... held up well last season despite averaging more than 25 minutes per game. Although not a soft player, he is not mean, either... you have to wonder why both Columbus and Minnesota passed on him in the expansion draft, since he is the perfect kind of player to help younger defensemen along.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2000-2001
Weinrich has arguably been the Habs' most consistent player the last two seasons. The veteran defender plays the most minutes, blocks the most shots and moves the puck from the blueline better than anyone else on the roster. Although miscast as a PP point man, he always gives an honest effort. In fact, he has become a true leader in Montreal.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2001-02
stepped up in Vladimir Malakhov's absence and delivered a solid two-way performance that saw him log the most icetime on the club... solid, aggressive rearguard isn't a great skater but uses his smarts and solid positioning to compensate... sudden blueline anchor is getting better with age...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2001-2002
The Flyers will probably ask him to be a #3-4. it will be a stretch, but Weinrich will make the effort... this is the first time in a long time Weinrich has played with a solid playoff contender.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2001-2002
Weinrich immediately provided Boston with valuable minutes from the back end - which had been missing since the departure of Ray Bourque the previous season. The veteran has improved his overall game with age. Weinrich is more consistent now than when he was 27... he still moves very well laterally and makes solid offensive contributions... will be a solid #3 rearquard and will be used in all situations.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2002-2003
In his first season with the Flyers, Weinrich helped solidify the blueline. He was immediately paired with Kim Johnsson and the duo became Philly's most reliable tandem. Weinrich is intelligent from the back end and moves the puck out of the zone quickly and efficiently... while he has good NHL size, he uses more brains than brawn to get the job done... the Flyers will continue to reply heavily on Weinrich in all situations.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2002-2003
an outstanding penalty killer and shot blocker...used to be pegged as a more offensive defenseman, but as he has matured, his finesse skills have become more valuable on the defensive side of the puck... an excellent team player in both performance and temperament, Weinrich proved to be one of the best free agent signings of 2001.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2002-2003
last summer's shrewdest investment... unexpectedly surfaced as the blueline anchor, leading the club with +27, although he was unusually error-prone in the playoffs... a steady, all-weather rearguard with good mobility, Weinrich plays a safe game, relying on his strong positional sense and efficient physical game, and provided the perfect climate for the emergence of Kim Johnsson...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2003-2004
Has an efficient style that allows him to play a lot of minutes... strong on the puck... can still handle 2nd PP unit time... would make a valuable contribution to a team that is deep on defense and could use him ion the third defense pair... such a good team guy...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2003-2004
Weinrich has few flaws in his game. Not a big point producer, he's nevertheless adept at making a clean first pass out of his zone. He won't check a player into the third row but always finishes them. Weinrich is also very positionally sound.

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08-10-2011, 01:33 AM
  #211
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Mike Grier, RW



- 6'1", 227 lbs
- 14th in Selke Voting (2008)
- Received Selke Votes in four other seasons
- Best seasons by seventies method: 41, 38, 33, 33, 32, 31, 29, 28
- Best ES seasons: 55, 44, 42, 40, 39, 36, 36, 34
- 0.39 adjusted ESP per game over 1060 games
- Killed 39% of penalties for his teams, 9% better than average
- 28 points in 101 playoff games
- 2, 1, 2, 4, 3 on his team in hits in the first 5 years they were recorded
- 14th in the NHL in hits by forwards during this period (1998-2002, Doan, Holik, Roberts and Laperriere were the drafted players ahead)
- 2, 4, 4, 3, 4, 4 on his team in hits since the lockout (no collective stats exist)
- despite this, takes a minor penalty about every six games
- 1.1 giveaways per takeaway (NHL average is about 1.8)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1997-98
Grier is a hockey player in a football player's body. He is an aggressive forechecker and bores in on the unfortunate puck carrier with all of the intensity of a lineman blitzing a quarterback. But Grier doesn't waste his energy. He's intelligent about when to come in full-tilt or when to back off a bit and pick off a hasty pass. He frightens a lot of people into mistakes, and the savvier he gets at reading their reactions the better he'll be.

The knock on Grier has always been his skating, but it is getting much better. He has a slow first couple of strides, but then gets into gear and is strong and balanced with his agility. He will score his goals like Adam Deadmarsh does, by driving to the net after loose pucks.

Grier lost about 15 pounds at the start of last season and he was a better player for it. He can't be too bulky, or he won't be agile enough for his pursuit. He isn't a fighter. It takes a lot to provoke him. He's just an honest, tough, physical winger. He played the Oilers last two playoff games on a badly sprained ankle.

Greer has dealt admirably with racism in his sport, and accepts the responsibility of being a role model for younger athletes. He made an amazing jump from college to the pros last season to become a valued member of an improving Oilers team. His attitude and work ethic are unassailable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 1997-98
Grier has tremendous size and strength and is not afraid to work hard. Realizes what his defensive responsibilities are and does that part of the job diligently… A power forward… Needs to get more confidence, although that will come with more ice time… He will continue to be a banger will be expected to contribute more offensively.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 1999-2000
Grier has quickly established himself as one of the premier cornerman in the league. With a combination of power and speed, Grier showed durability and consistency in his game for the first time. The big man plays like a running back on skates. Dominating his side of the ice, Grier is a solid defensive player and is rounding out his offensive game. An emerging force, Grier may still develop into a scoring power forward.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 1999-2000
Grier definitely believes that the most direct route to the net is the best path to choose. He won't hesitate to bull his way through two defenseman to get there… Since he always keeps his legs pumping, he draws a good share of penalties… He is the unsung hero of the Oilers… 20 goals seems to be his top end, but added to his other qualities, it's plenty.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 1999-2000
notched just 10 goals in the first 69 games last year before elevating his play after the trade deadline with seven in the last 10 games. Big strong power forward can shoot, has excellent speed and adds an intimidating physical presence.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2000-2001
a sound penalty killer and a shorthanded scoring threat… Has shown good progress since his surgery and would have been able to play in the later rounds of the playoffs if Edmonton had gone that far…
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2000-2001
Grier looks like a runaway bulldozer when he's heading for the net. a winger in a football player's body, Grier is far from being a natural goal scorer with most of his goals coming on loose pucks and scrappy put ins... Grier usually forms a gritty unit with Ethan Moreau and Todd Marchant, one of the NHL's best defensive trios. They also seem to become more offensively potent when facing the opposition's best line. Greer has great strength and is almost impossible to knock down. He would be quite a goalscorer if he had better hands. Nonetheless, he still has what it takes to net 20.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2000-2001
failed to duplicate his career 20 goal effort from the previous season but did establish himself as a key member of the Oilers tenacious hound line before undergoing season-ending elbow surgery… Powerful winger with intimidating size and strength, he has impressive straightaway speed and can alter a game's momentum with his punishing hits… Club missed his muscle against Dallas in the playoffs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2001-2002
isn't a natural goal scorer, but his effort pays off around the net.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2001-2002
the burly right winger played a good chunk of last season with a dislocated shoulder. In fact, Grier had to pop it back in on several occasions during the course of the year. Ouch! Amazingly, he only missed 8 contests in total. Aside from his obviously high pain threshold, Grier is also an excellent checker and penalty killing forward. Last season, he finished tied for sixth in the league with six shorthanded points, including three goals.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2002-2003
Grier is hard to figure. It seems that he plays well every other year… His size and strength along the boards is unparalleled, as his attention to detail in the defensive zone. He and center Todd Marchant form one of the most effective penalty killing combinations in the NHL. Offensively, he lacks the hands of a consistent scorer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2002-2003
imposing… Rugged, north-south winger is very effective on the penalty kill and can create space when he fully utilizes his great size and strength, although ongoing shoulder problems have limited shooting range and steadily eroded his physical game.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2002-2003
Grier is tough but he isn't a fighter.… The unsung hero of the Oilers… Best to consider him a defensive forward and expect 10 to 12 goals instead of 20.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2003-2004
the capitals got exactly what they bargained for when they acquired Grier from Edmonton last year – two way power forward that can fill a variety of roles on the club. The big man struggled within the System at first, which helps explain his unusually shaky -14. Grier provides grit in front of the net along with decent offensive instincts and leadership qualities… Now that he is settled in with the caps, he will become more of a factor. He should see lots of time on the penalty killing unit and return to the 20 goal plateau is well within reach.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Scouting Report 2003-2004
an unsung hero who will do just about anything the coaches ask… A defensive forward who can handle some second unit power-play time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2005-06
made a strong first impression in Buffalo with his leadership and sound two-way game… Not overly skilled but a popular, strong skating player who create space in scoring chances with his excellent speed, determination and hard-hitting physical style
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sports Forecaster 2006-2007
Grier is a very good defensive forward turned up his all-around game substantially in the playoffs. His offensive attitude suggests it's easier to go through a defender then around him. Very strong, Grier is a veritable force along the boards as well as an awesome penalty killer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2006-2007
Grier has always been thick, both in body type and style of play. He can contribute offensively but is at his best in a shutdown or penalty killing role. He's a dependable and versatile forward.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2007-2008
a mountain of a man, Grier is as good a third line role player as there is in the NHL. A great penalty killer and shutdown winger, he will also drop the gloves and chip in offensively. He's important to team success.
Quote:
Originally Posted by McKeen's Hockey Pool Yearbook 2009-2010
for 10 consecutive years, Grier's production has fallen in the 22 to 36 point range. Now 35, he will continue to add hustle and defensive savvy to the penalty kill.


Last edited by seventieslord: 08-10-2011 at 11:28 AM.
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08-16-2011, 01:15 PM
  #212
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Rod Flett, D



Stanley Cup Championships, 1896, & 1901, 1902
Inducted into the Manitoban HHoF

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manitoba HoF
Born in Winnipeg, this defenceman played with the famed Winnipeg Victorias back in the early days of hockey and was re gard ed as one of the best pointmen in the game. In a ten-year career, he was on nine Manitoba championship teams and besides fellow Hockey Hall of Famer Dan Bain, Rod Flett was the only other to play on both Winnipeg Victorias’ Stanley Cup winning teams in 1896 and 1901.
Quote:
The brothers were good-sized men, Rod stood 6’ 3” and Magnus was 6’1’’.
Quote:
As Stanley Cup champion, the Victorias accepted a challenge from Toronto Wellingtons, champions of the Ontario Hockey Association(OHA), played during the regular season. The first game was played under Ontario rules, the second under Manitoba rules. Unusually, in the first game a goal was scored by Rod Flett of Winnipeg, however this goal was into his own net. No Toronto player is credited for the goal, Mr. Flett is. Winnipeg would win the series 5–3, 5–3 (2–0).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windsor Daily Star May 18, 1957,
Dick Irvin
"The Winnipeg Club's defence consisted of only two brothers in those days of 60 minute men. Like all rearguards of that era, they were supposed to stay in their own end. However, I remember a commotion, almost a bewilderment in the crowd that night when word was flashed by telegraph that Rod Flett, by a long, backhand flip up through the rafters had scored a goal.

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08-16-2011, 01:27 PM
  #213
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Ulf Sterner, LW/C



World champion 1962
WC-silver 1963, 1967, 1969, 1970, 1973
WC-bronze 1971
Olympic silver 1964
WC best forward 1969.
Inducted into IIHF Hall of Fame in 2001.

Quote:
Originally Posted by P4 (a swedish radio station)
He was a cross-tufted duck! The words are television profile, and sports journalist Lennart Hyland and describes to some extent what made Ulf Sterner to such a successful hockey player, namely a strong will and courage to go his own way.

In an interview from 1990, when Ulf Sterner was 49 years old, he was interviewed about his long and successful but also turbulent hockey career. In addition, Ulf Sterner, we hear from team mate Tre Kronor, Sven Tumba and sports journalist Lennart Hyland.

Previews: Ulf Sterner said his reputation as a tough guy on the ice
Ulf Sterner (born 1941) is the first European ice hockey player who became a hockey pro in NHL league in the United States, 1964-1965 season, when he wrote on the game with the New York Rangers. But his long playing career in the years 1956-1978 contains in particular a series of big victories with Swedish hockey team. Uffe Sterner has a World Cup gold (1963), five World Championship silver and an Olympic silver in 1964 in the merit list from the national team game, and when he debuted in the Three Crowns in 1959 he was the squad's youngest player of all time. The last World Cup tournament for Sterner was 1973 and in total he played 189 international matches in the A-national team shirt.

Ulf Sterner was brought up in Deje and his career started in Forshaga IF 1956 when Ulf was only 15 years old.

Then there was playing in Frölunda, USA (AHL + Rangers), Rögle and Farjestad, London Lions, and his career ended in Vänersborg for the goalscoring center. In the interview, Ulf Sterner story of how he almost got the contract also in Canada, but declined because he had been threatened with murder by Canadian hockey fans.
Ulf Sterner was elected to the IIHL Hall Of Fame in 2001 and that year was hoisted Sterner shirt up on the place of honor in the Gold Blend Arena.
Sorry but I don't have the time to try to translate a whole interview in Swedish.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey Sweden
The Swedish pioneer
Old School NHL - Ulf Sterner
He was the first Swedish-bred players in the NHL. In an exclusive interview with hockeysverige.se says Ulf Sterner for his career all hockey adventures: how he was filming a nude Sven Tumba, chased by angry Canadians and stole a fake contract from an unscrupulous American general manager.
Gustaf Forslund, born in Umeå, but grew up in Canada, was known as the first Swedish citizen who played in the NHL. But the first player brought up in the Swedish hockey to play in the toughest hockey league was Dejesonen Ulf Sterner. Last winter filled Sterner, 70, and here he tells hockeysverige.se's readers about his trip over to the NHL season 1964/65.

Ulf Sterner, who must be seen as perhaps the first truly complete two-way center, grew up in a small community with about 2000 inhabitants, not far from Karlstad in Värmland, Deje.
- My debut in Dejes A-team, in Division 2 as it was called at that time, I did when I was only twelve or thirteen years, says Sterner.
- You can not compare to today and any free time was about hockey and football in those years. We had a very good youth team which includes my brother Owe Sterner also was involved in where we were a chain came up in the first team around the same time.
- Since I was recruited to Forshaga who was in top flight and where I came to be Allsvenskan youngest player ever since I debuted as a fifteen year old.

Did you play in the same chain as Nisse Nilsson in Forshaga?
- In the beginning I did which was great fun. But I had never borrowed the puck by Nisse so it was a little boring in the end haha ​​...
- At this time, it's just tackled in his own zone and usually took Nisse puck behind his own goal and when he was over the center line, he had such a high speed so it was impossible to stop him. He was a fantastic and very skilled player.
- After one season, I had rather play with Uffe Hedqvist and we both came of course also make his debut in the national team together.

When you debuted in the Three Crowns?
- I was already in 1958 in an international match between A-and B-squad and it was well Nisse who had talked me into the team. My real debut was against the Czechs in Stockholm. Sweden had played against the Czechs on the day before and lost by 2-1 and had five men wounded. That night, I played with the B-squad up in Sundsvall, but after the game put me on the train to Stockholm to play with the Three Crowns on the following day. I'm between Sven Tumba and Kurre Thulin. We won 11-3 and I scored two goals.

Filmed Tumba naked - being chased

Photo:
At the 1960 Olympic Games in Squaw Valley ends the Three Crowns in fifth place in a tournament where a then nineteen-year-old Ulf Sterner making his international tournament debut.
- The tournament, I remember to Tumba chased me through the entire Squaw Valley haha ​​... We stayed in a barracks-like hotel with four beds in each room. Tumba lay naked on her bed, philosophising and then I took the opportunity to film him as he discovered and became totally crazy. He chased me around there in town until he had obtained the film.
- It happened a lot of fun on that trip but above all it was a great adventure for a young guy I was then. Unfortunately, it was not so well in the tournament. It turned out that a couple of our players, including Einar "kiosk" Granath, was injured before the tournament. But the darker it because they did not want to miss this kind of dream trip.

After the World Cup tournament in 1961 in Switzerland chose Ulf Sterner to leave Forshaga the game in hard betting Vastra Frolunda.
- It was difficult to work in Forshaga and in Karlstad and the club could not even arrange for me at the mill. I had to move quite easily if I could get a job and it was only Frölunda who showed interest. This was the first year that you had to charge at the transitions. Negotiations dragged on and the day before the final release date had Anders Berma determined time with Haga Fors Lasse Davidsson in Mellerud. But Davidsson never came and after a new contact on the phone determined Amal but no Davidsson there either. In the end they were seen in Grums and agreed a transfer fee of six thousand dollars.

World Championship gold in 1962 in Denver Colorado?
- We went over three weeks before the World Cup to earn the team which was much needed. When we arrived at Bromma to fly over, a young guy that we had no idea who it was. It turned out to be the reserve goalkeeper "Klimpen" Hägg Roth from Skellefteå. It was just Kjell Svensson, who was for us in the squad so we did not have a very good track of who he was.
- I remember we lived in a cave on the border between the U.S. and Canada at this camp and one day we would play the match we had been out partying the night before and "Klimpen" was really bad. We had luckily a doctor with us who was called and Sjostrom, who helped "Klimpen" on this trip where he became the world's best goalkeeper. (Lennart Hägg Roth has written about this and his alcoholism in his book Heaven and Hell, editor. Note.).

Mocked Canadians - was chased again
- Above all else, we had a damn good team in place that year. "Klimpen" and "Kjell" Smith was the goalkeepers. Bert-Ola Nordlander, Rolle Stoltz, "Masen" Karlsson, Gert Blom and "Nick" Johansson was in reverse. Then played "Nisse" Nilsson, "Sura" (Ronald Pettersson) and Lasse Lundvall in a chain. Tumba played together with "Smiley" Öhrlund and "Smiley" Maatta. Then there was the chain with me, "Akka" Andersson and paramedical Hardin. Leif Andersson from Södertälje was as an extra forward.

- In the game against Canada that was to decide the tournament and we win by 5-3 I do two of the goals, Nisse two and a Tumba. My 3-0 goal, I remember best because I had taken a Spearing of "Dirty Harry", Harry Smith, ten minutes before. They had as a tactic to remove an opponent player and it did me. I had fainted, but recovered by me and after I made the 3-0 case, I went up to their booth, took off my glove and made a long nose, then ten-channel dicker threw himself over the boards to chase me.
- Me and "Nisse" met recently in fact Harry who also played with Darryl Sly, and was the toughest backpar that I have ever met. It was a really fun meeting and Harry is a fantastic nice person outside of the ice.

Was it during the World Cup in 1962 as the first contacts with the NHL was taken?
- It was probably there that the possibilities were opened in all cases. I, "Totte" Bengtsson, Juha Widing, Jan-Erik "pouch" Sjoberg and Soren Blomgren went over in 1963, together with Ulf Jansson, who was then a bit of an agent for the New York Rangers. But I wanted to play in the Olympics in Innsbruck first so I returned the first home to Sweden.

Ulf Jansson, weather man?
- (Laughter) Well, you know that? Uffe's an incredibly nice guy and great journalist. We were at camp in Winnipeg and I had gone to bed early because we trained three sessions a day, plus we were forced to walk the two and a half kilometers back and forth to the rink every workout. So it was a bit out of the body.
- When I turn on the TV in the morning is the news and the weather will crackle it and in comes a drunk, happy and very excited Uffe Jansson in the image and to present the weather. He had stayed on the television station after an interview and where it had been invited to a little drink. Now he was there in the live broadcast and talked about all the polar bears on the streets of Stockholm and his close and imaginary friendship with Anita Ekberg. This turned out to be a success and it was voted the year's funniest TV spots in Canada that year.

Did slap shot in the forehead

Photo:
After playing first for the St.. Paul Ranger in the CPHL and the Baltimore Clippers of the AHL was a chance for Ulf Sterner to season 1964/65 to make NHL debut with the New York Rangers.
- The debut was against the Boston Bruins. But days before his debut, I had received a slap shot in the forehead of a teammate as I sat in our booth during a game with Baltimore, so I was feeling not very well. But it was not the time to say no to the New York Rangers when they finally got the chance to play in the NHL.
- Training before the match, I remember quite well. We trained in the old Garden, which lay on the fourth or fifth floor, which was not a full plan. All were set up at the blue line and I then at the end of the boards. Then came one of their bosses in and yelled at the guys certainly an hour because they had been out partying the day before the match. This was around Christmas and Rangers was in fifth place and there were four teams that went to the playoffs then. Rangers had no chance to go there so the guys did not care that much. But we really had to run hard on that day for the boss was not merciful to us.

Despite success with its fine puck treatment and fine skating so it was only four games in the NHL for Sterner Broadway Blues (by their blue shirts). "I've never seen a player improve themselves as quickly as Uffe and never a player who treats the puck so elegant," said New York Rangers coach George "Red" Sullivan, among others.
- They handed out the match and the stars in one game, I was one of the two and in two of the other matches I was one of five stars. Although I did not make any points, it was pretty good.
- Before the next match, which incidentally was against the Detroit Red Wings, Sullivan took me into the office and said calmly that now we have been playing now ready to begin gravity. He told me to start giving back and play in the game against Detroit, I had to take care of Gordie Howe. Detroit players put up all the time the club away from their noses when they approached me. When I came to the booth, I asked my kedjekompisar why they did so and the answer was that I came closer than Gordie Howe would slap haha ​​...

Why was there no more games in the NHL with the New York Rangers this season?
- Each club had to have twenty so-called prospects that could go between the Farm Team and the New York Rangers and I was one of them. Other players in the minor team to be free to go to other clubs. So I, Jacques Plante, Andy Bathgate and a couple of players to was demoted in favor of eight or nine players in Baltimore that was not so-called prospects.
- It was a very bad regime in the New York Rangers during this time and there was no real cohesion in the team. Admittedly, I had a contract for another season. But I did not want to go back but I stopped simply left in Sweden and broke the contract.

How liked you in St. Paul and Baltimore?
- In St. Paul, it was really good and where I had Fred Shero as their coach. A great leader who unfortunately was drunk a little too often. But he still had the ability to get the group together in a very good way.
- Living in Baltimore was horrible. It was extremely high crime and when we had an improvised ending with the team, there were both shootings and fights in the hotel where we were.

Went to training camp recently had an operation
After his season in the United States returned Ulf Sterner for Swedish hockey. But not to Frölunda instead of Gosta "Pollen King" Carlsson and Rögle BK.
- Frölunda was Swedish champion when I moved back to Kungalv but they never heard of him. One day, a Canadian named Des Moroney outside my door and asked if I wanted to come to Rögle and play instead. I did two seasons in Rögle and I must say that there were two very nice years. After that I did another year in Frölunda before I moved to Karlstad, where I had six very good and pleasant seasons with Farjestad.

For the season 1973/74 tried to Detroit Red Wings owner Bruce Norris to start up a European League, where British-based London Lions would be one of the teams. A team that initially contained Leif "Honken" Holmqvist but Ulf Sterner.
- I actually belonged to the Rangers still so I had to first appear before me at their training camp even though I had recently had an operation and still had twenty stitches remain outside of the Achilles tendon. It was a commodity, but after a while Detroit and New York Rangers agree on where to play.
- It was a pretty damn fun season where we played a lot of matches and where it went pretty well for me (Uffe made 115 points in 64 games). Unfortunately sat Swedish Ice Hockey Association President Helge Berglund end to its European professional league, which I otherwise think would have been good. We played at Wembley Pool, swimming pool, where they put wooden planks on the pool and the ice froze. In the beginning they had only a small ice machine because the planks would not hold for any larger car.
- Tord Lundstrom also came to the Lions in the season and then it was us three Swedes and a lot of promising young Canadians. We Swedes was superior in the game and I'm in a chain with Earl Anderson and Dennis Johnson. But we had a coach, Doug Barkley, who hated the Swedes, so there were some conflicts during the year.

What did you think the matches against Canada's professionals in Stockholm in 1972 where, among other things, Lars-Erik Sjoberg was nose rejection?

Photo:
- Canada had lost to the Soviet days before they would play against us so it was quite a sprained Canada we faced. We played two games and Canada won the first with a cry of distress (1-4) and the second we played a draw (4-4). Phil Esposito had a sidekick named Wayne Cashman and at a blow-off, I hear the photographer Rolle Rygin shouting at me from the frame edge when he wants to take a picture. Then I hear that there will be someone behind me who wields the hammer to my head. But I can set the table and put up my legs in place so he falls headlong straight into the ice. The days after I received at least ten murders letters from people in Canada.
- The day after, I and Benny Andersson from Farjestad go over to the WHA team the Chicago Cougars and visit. I had no plans to write on. But one day, their general manager called me into the office and said that the rumor reached him that I had not written on. "No, I have not answered me." Then he hauled up a contract with something that possibly looked like my signature on. But he had not even managed to spell my name right. When he filled his glass, I managed to sneak into the contract in my bag and then he tried to get me to sign a new contract. When I refused he threw me out from there. Journalist Thorwald Olsson did get wind of this and went up with this to the Chicago Tribune, which first opened it wide and it was a hell of a life in the entire hockey world.
- After wondering instead Quebec Nordiques if I wanted to play there instead, which I declined.

The season after the London Lions and the incident in an office in Chicago chooses Ulf Sterner game in Gothenburg club creek.
- I always liked to play in teams that are on the way up and it was BK creek, which the club was then called. We had a good team with a pair of channel dicker on the team. But as in so many clubs lost the money from the till. We were near the Elite League a year, but finished second in the qualification matches for Sodertalje. Where we made a jättefel who moved our games from our usual home stadium in Frölundaborg to Scandinavium. We lost a lot of our large audience, the feeling and closeness.

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