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MLD2011 Sir Montagu Allan Rnd 1: Philadelphia Quakers (2) vs Pittsburgh Hornets (7)

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Old
08-16-2011, 09:15 PM
  #51
Dreakmur
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
What is the alternate team? Just the next best guys or best spares?
It's the 2nd team.

Voters could give players 1st or 2nd votes.

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08-16-2011, 09:15 PM
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Havelid was on the same team as White for 15 games, and IIRC, White was injured for some of them....

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08-16-2011, 09:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Havelid was on the same team as White for 15 games, and IIRC, White was injured for some of them....
I was going off NHL.com's roster and TOI, either way my point was made about White.

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08-17-2011, 12:22 AM
  #54
seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
I saw that, but I was trying to figure out what this meant.



What is the alternate team? Just the next best guys or best spares?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreakmur View Post
It's the 2nd team.

Voters could give players 1st or 2nd votes.
Correct. Three points for a 1st in those days, one for a 2nd team vote. I added up the total voting points last month.

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08-17-2011, 12:27 AM
  #55
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Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
I was going off NHL.com's roster and TOI, either way my point was made about White.
For a White-type of player (and this goes for Jason Smith too), I'd rather break ice time down across situation, because he's effectively getting zero powerplay time for obvious reasons. The only reason White's even strength partner Mike Mottau got more ice time than White for a season and a half was because his offense was less pathetic than White's.

Defense-only defensemen tend to get underrated by looking at ice time in general, because they generally get very few minutes in offensive situations, but the minutes they do get are the most physically taxing of any skater.

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08-17-2011, 12:04 PM
  #56
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
For a White-type of player (and this goes for Jason Smith too), I'd rather break ice time down across situation, because he's effectively getting zero powerplay time for obvious reasons. The only reason White's even strength partner Mike Mottau got more ice time than White for a season and a half was because his offense was less pathetic than White's.

Defense-only defensemen tend to get underrated by looking at ice time in general, because they generally get very few minutes in offensive situations, but the minutes they do get are the most physically taxing of any skater.
Shorthanded: 5, 4, 5, 4, 2, 1, 3, 3, 1, 1
ES: 5, 4, 4, 3, 2, 3, 3, 6, 4, 4

It's better, but still not amazing. 3x 1st in SH TOI is good, and adds to his resume, but I still don't think he's that impressive. Even strength is usually the time where the defensemen that the coach trusts the most play the most, and that wasn't really the case with White.

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08-17-2011, 12:22 PM
  #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
Shorthanded: 5, 4, 5, 4, 2, 1, 3, 3, 1, 1
ES: 5, 4, 4, 3, 2, 3, 3, 6, 4, 4

It's better, but still not amazing. 3x 1st in SH TOI is good, and adds to his resume, but I still don't think he's that impressive. Even strength is usually the time where the defensemen that the coach trusts the most play the most, and that wasn't really the case with White.
I assume that the 4, 4, 3 years were the seasons when White played on the same team as Scott Stevens, Scott Niedermayer and Brian Rafalski? Hardly damning that he played behind those 3 on what was arguably the best group of top 4 defensemen since the 1970s!

The 4, 4, 3, 2, 3, 3 run is exactly what you'd expect from a one-dimensional shut down defenseman on an excellent defensive team - exactly what White was.

The 2002-03 Devils who won the Stanley Cup had a pathetic offense and a rotating group of hasbeens on their bottom pairing. They were carried to the Cup by goaltending and their top 4 defense. White was the least important of the top 4, but he was still damn important.

Speaking the coach trusting players, I believe that in at least 2 seasons after the lockout, White was top 5 in the "quality of competition" stat leaguewide. He might have played a minute less per game than a two-way guy like Andy Greene (that single minute being the difference between "1" and "3" on a team without a true #1 defenseman, but he faced much tougher minutes. Edit: It appears his QoC was about what you'd expect from a guy with his role and minutes, not worth noting either way.


Last edited by TheDevilMadeMe: 08-17-2011 at 01:04 PM.
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Old
08-17-2011, 12:56 PM
  #58
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Speaking the coach trusting players, I believe that in at least 2 seasons after the lockout, White was top 5 in the "quality of competition" stat leaguewide. He might have played a minute less per game than a two-way guy like Andy Greene (that single minute being the difference between "1" and "3" on a team without a true #1 defenseman, but he faced much tougher minutes.
24th in 07-08
52nd in 08-09
51st in 09-10
65th in 10-11

50 game minimum, taken from behindthenet.ca. They only have 07-11, is there a site that has 05-06 and 06-07?

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08-17-2011, 01:03 PM
  #59
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
24th in 07-08
52nd in 08-09
51st in 09-10
65th in 10-11

50 game minimum, taken from behindthenet.ca. They only have 07-11, is there a site that has 05-06 and 06-07?
Huh, weird. I distinctly remember that in one of the Brent Sutter years (which would have been 07-08 or 08-09) that the White-Mottau ranked ridiculously high in the QOC stat (which is best used as an estimate of actual real life quality of competition).

Those numbers above aren't bad, but aren't particularly impressive either.

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08-17-2011, 01:39 PM
  #60
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Goalies

Roloson and Puppa are the starting goalies. Both played in pretty close eras. Puppa was 2nd and 3rd in Vezina voting, Roloson was 6th and 9th in Vezina voting with the 9th being only 3 points. Puppa was 2nd and 5th in all star voting, Roloson was 7th and 8th with the 8th being only 8 points. Here's a look at top 10s:

GAA

Puppa: 5, 7, 8, 9
Roloson: 2, 3

SV%

Puppa: 2, 3, 6
Roloson: 1, 2

Shutouts

Puppa: 3, 6, 9, 9, 10
Roloson: 8

Wins

Puppa: 1, 9
Roloson: none

Both had the misfortune of playing on pretty crappy teams throughout their careers. And for Roloson, those strong finishes in SV% and GAA were under Minnesota's very defensive system that enhanced goalies' numbers. The only thing that Roloson has that Puppa doesn't is 2 strong playoff runs, with the Lightning and Oilers. But, I don't think it's enough to make up for Puppa's advantages in other areas.

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08-17-2011, 02:02 PM
  #61
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Those numbers above aren't bad, but aren't particularly impressive either.
Agree... it is well above-average.

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Old
08-17-2011, 06:49 PM
  #62
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PPs

Green-Ftorek-McDougall
Wilson-Doughty

vs.

Shepelev-Himes-Davidson
Trapp-Morrison

You can take a look at my comparison between Green and Shepelev before, I basically concluded that they are pretty close offensively, with maybe a slight edge to Shepelev that I think is made up with Green's toughness and being better defensively. But since this is the PP, the defense doesn't mean anything so in terms of being effective on a PP, I'll give a slight advantage to Shepelev. Ftorek and Himes was long discussed as well, Himes is the better offensive player. Davidson and McDougall were both pre-1900 guys, but McDougall is much better. His 1.361 goals/game kills Davidson's .692, nearly doubling it. McDougall is much better. I also think that the gap between McDougall and Davidson is the largest among all the forward matchups. Overall, I think the forwards are pretty even with no big advantage to one team or another.

Wilson and Trapp is a difficult comparison. They both played during the same time, but in different leagues. Trapp's best offensive finishes were 1, 4, 4, 6, and 7. Wilson's were 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1. Even considering the difference in leagues, I think Wilson is the better offensive player. He was a renowned offensive defenseman with great puck skills. Doughty and Morrison is more difficult. Morrison definitely has the edge in longevity on Doughty. Their career adjusted PPGs are .5523 to .3381, a pretty big edge to Doughty. Here are their Vs2 in points:

Morrison: 64, 59, 58, 49, 49, 38, 38.
Doughty: 86, 65, 42

Doughty has the 2 best years, but Morrison has the longevity after that. I'll give an edge to Morrison here because of his more proven offensive ability and longevity.

1st PP units are pretty much even. Maybe the slightest of edges to Philadelphia because I think Wilson is that much better than either Pittsburgh defenseman, but it's not much. Although, I do think Philadelphia has the best forward and best defenseman on either unit(McDougall and Wilson).

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08-18-2011, 12:02 PM
  #63
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PP2

Tanti-Backstrom-Johnson
Smith-Dorey

vs.

Lukowich-Jackson-Babych
Evans-Young

Tanti is better than Lukowich offensively, and Backstrom is better than Jackson offensively, I have no doubt about either of those. A look at Babych and Johnson is closer. Babych has the best season among either of them with that one great goalscoring season. But, let's look at their 5 best seasons in terms of points in percentages:

Johnson: 57, 69, 44, 47, 42(total 259)
Babych: 40, 48, 49, 71, 30(total 238)

Johnson gets the edge here. But, we have to take into account that Babych was somewhat injury prone and always seemed to miss some games. Babych scored at a better per game clip, but Johnson has longevity on his side. In terms of who is more effective on a PP, it's quite close. Their offense appears about equal. Babych brings a bit of a power game, so that might tip things very slightly in his favor, but I'm not sure.

Either way, the forwards on the 2nd units are an advantage to Philadelphia.

Smith and Evans' careers overlap somewhat in the early 30s. Here's a look at their 7 best seasons in percentages:

Smith-76, 64, 53, 44, 43, 42, 39(total 361)
Evans-29, 26, 46, 42, 59, 72, 35(total 309)

Decisive advantage to Alex Smith there.

That takes us to Tim Young and Jim Dorey. It's unfair to use Young's forward numbers when comparing the two as PPQBs, so I don't see a real good way of doing this. I'm just going to not compare these two because I don't see a good way of doing it.

Overall, 2nd PP units are an advantage to Philadelphia. The forward matchups are an advantage overall to Philadelphia, and Smith is a better PPQB than Evans.

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08-18-2011, 01:29 PM
  #64
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PK1

Yelle-Kallur
Johnsson-Juzda

vs.

Fitzgerald-Murphy
Smith-White

Yelle and Fitzgerald are two of the strongest PKers in this draft. Let's look at their finishes since SH TOI/G was recorded:

Yelle: 1, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 3
Fitzgerald: 2*, 1, 3, 3, 1, 3, 3, 6

*Behind Yelle

So, Yelle is clearly superior here. But, note that this doesn't count Fitzgerald's first half of his career. His first 4 years he didn't kill many penalties at all, but after that was probably one of the best PKers on his team. I'm not going to do the leg work for my opponent and do all that math to find out where he finishes. I think it's safe to conclude Yelle is better, considering Yelle is one of the best PKers in the draft.

Kallur is a better PKer than Murphy. Here is what I wrote earlier:

Quote:
In Murphy and Kallur, we have 2 of the strongest penalty killers in the draft. Both were noted shorthanded threats, each with 19 career shorthanded goals. But, Kallur did it in less than half as many games(383 compared to Murphy's 831), so Kallur is the better shorthanded threat, and might be the best shorthanded threat in this draft. Looking at who was a better PKer, I'd take Kallur as both the better shorthanded threat and defensive PKer. Murphy has no notable Selke finishes that I could find, whereas Kallur finished 7th and 10th(less than 10 points though). Kallur is better defensively.
Johnsson and Smith is probably an advantage to Smith, who was known as a defensive defenseman whereas Johnsson was more of a smart two-way guy. I think Juzda and Colin White is a definite advantage to Juzda, he can clear the crease like few can in this draft. I think of Juzda as White on steroids.

Overall, I'd say 1st unit PKs are an advantage to Philadelphia. Philadelphia's forwards are better in my opinion, and the defensemen are about even.

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08-18-2011, 01:41 PM
  #65
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let me offer some assistance with Johnson and Babych.

Both played wing on the PP throughout the 1980s and had similar length careers.

Babych averaged 17 adjusted PPP per 80 games, playing 42% of the PP time.
Johnson averaged 20 adjusted PPP per 80 games, playing 49% of the PP time.

Per unit of PP time they produced at practically identical levels. Due to a higher level of experience (both in PP time and total games), you can expect Johnson to be more reliable there, I'd say, but the gap between them is incredibly minimal especially when you consider Babych can play roles on the PP that Johnson can't (digger, net presence).

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08-18-2011, 01:45 PM
  #66
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Kallur and Murphy both got 36% PK time for their teams. Kallur's teams enjoyed considerably more PK success than Murphy's teams, but I'm pretty sure teammates had a lot to do with that. Also, Murphy did it for over 2X as many NHL games. Your guess is as good as mine who the better "all-time" penalty killer is.

also, I would not use the same quote to justify Kallur having an advantage both in 3rd line comparisons (ES) and SH play, as they are separate things. If he's a better penalty killer, then that is all that says, it doesn't necessarily mean he was better defensively, although it could be part of the picture.

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08-18-2011, 03:40 PM
  #67
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That's true, it kind of falls into the category of it doesn't necessarily mean that it's true, but it certainly gives the indication. The fact that Kallur is that more of a shorthanded threat helps his case as well.

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08-18-2011, 05:25 PM
  #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
3rd Lines

Mike Krushelnyski-Michal Pivonka-Anders Kallur

vs.

Andre Pronvost-Art Jackson-Mike Murphy

Offensively, Krushelnyski is easily superior. His adjusted career .5229 PPG trumps Pronovost's .3974. It's not close. Defensively, I'd give a small edge to Pronovost, but it's certainly not as large as their gap in offensive ability. Krushelnyski is a better skater and stickhandler as well. Pronovost is probably a little more physical, despite being smaller. Overall, the largest gap between the two is the offensive gap, and that combined with better hands and speed make Krushelnyski the superior player.

That brings us to Michal Pivonka and Art Jackson. I'm not convinced Art Jackson is that strong of a player. His strongest years offensively came when Boston's top players left and he played with Bill Cowley and Herb Cain as the obvious 3rd best player on the line. Also in his previous years, I can't help but think he was getting some extremely favorable matchups. Schmidt-Cowley was a tremendous 1-2 punch to have, and they were definitely drawing the most attention from opposing teams in terms of matchups, leaving Jackson out against the weaker players on the other team. If you adjust Jackson's assist finishes to Pivonka's league size, Pivonka comes out as the much better playmaker. Pivonka has an edge in physicality as well. In terms of defensive play, Pivonka was called a top defensive center, and Jackson was just called a "checker". Overall, I like Pivonka as the better overall player with all things considered.

In Murphy and Kallur, we have 2 of the strongest penalty killers in the draft. Both were noted shorthanded threats, each with 19 career shorthanded goals. But, Kallur did it in less than half as many games(383 compared to Murphy's 831), so Kallur is the better shorthanded threat, and might be the best shorthanded threat in this draft. Looking at who was a better PKer, I'd take Kallur as both the better shorthanded threat and defensive PKer. Murphy has no notable Selke finishes that I could find, whereas Kallur finished 7th and 10th. Kallur is better defensively. Offensively, Murphy was a better point producer in the NHL, but Kallur does have a good resume from his years in Sweden. But, Murphy is probably a little better offensive overall. Kallur was known as being a great skater, I'd give him an advantage here as well. Murphy was a more physical player. All things considered, I think Kallur is the better overall player.

Overall, 3rd lines are an advantage to Philadelphia. Philadelphia's 3rd line is better offensively, and probably slightly better defensively as well.
By the way I never got to the Pronovost and Krushelnyski comparison, so I'm going to go ahead and take care of that now. Pronovost is a guy I almost took in the ATD with my last selection, but we ended up deciding we wanted a guy who could also play center.

Pronovost is an equal skater to Krushelnyski in my view (check out the Our Canadiens site, he was cited as a strong skater who had strength despite his compact frame). Both were among the better skaters in the NHL in their times. Also, Pronovost is a much better defender than Krush. Krush was known as a solid contributer on a third checking line, whereas Pronovost "Effectively stifling superstars on opposing teams, Pronovost played a key role in the Habs’ success," and was a "defensive specialist" for the Canadiens playing with Provost and Goyette. Also, I think Pronovost is a lot more physical as well as he was known for a "heavy hip check he consistently brought to the rink every night."

As far as offense, I think the comparison is closer than it is made out to be here. Pronovost wasn't a scoring line player in his career (mostly because of who he was playing behind), but he still brought enough to be a threat, as evidenced by his 16 goals in '58, which was 27th in the NHL which isn't bad for a guy who was a defensive specialist. He's also got a few 35-43 ranks in goals as well. He was in my opinion, every bit as good of a goal scorer as a guy like Eric Nesterenko. While he's not as good as Krushelnyski offensively, I think the picture is closer than the one painted here. If you go by adjusted goals per game instead of points, and take out Krush's Gretzky season (don't feel like doing the math), then I think that it will paint a much closer picture in offensive value.

I think Pronovost in their presently constructed line functions is a more valuable piece here than Krushelnyski, especially when taking playoff performance into account.

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08-18-2011, 06:26 PM
  #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vecens24 View Post
Pronovost is an equal skater to Krushelnyski in my view (check out the Our Canadiens site, he was cited as a strong skater who had strength despite his compact frame). Both were among the better skaters in the NHL in their times. Also, Pronovost is a much better defender than Krush. Krush was known as a solid contributer on a third checking line, whereas Pronovost "Effectively stifling superstars on opposing teams, Pronovost played a key role in the Habsí success," and was a "defensive specialist" for the Canadiens playing with Provost and Goyette. Also, I think Pronovost is a lot more physical as well as he was known for a "heavy hip check he consistently brought to the rink every night."
No doubt, Pronovost is definitely a few pegs higher in terms of defensive play over Krush.

Quote:
As far as offense, I think the comparison is closer than it is made out to be here. Pronovost wasn't a scoring line player in his career (mostly because of who he was playing behind), but he still brought enough to be a threat, as evidenced by his 16 goals in '58, which was 27th in the NHL which isn't bad for a guy who was a defensive specialist. He's also got a few 35-43 ranks in goals as well. He was in my opinion, every bit as good of a goal scorer as a guy like Eric Nesterenko. While he's not as good as Krushelnyski offensively, I think the picture is closer than the one painted here. If you go by adjusted goals per game instead of points, and take out Krush's Gretzky season (don't feel like doing the math), then I think that it will paint a much closer picture in offensive value.
Color me unimpressed by being 27th in a 6 team league, let alone 35-43. Okay, he wasn't playing in a role that gave him a lot of opportunities to score goals because he was playing behind a bunch of better players. But just because of that, we can't add hypothetical offense to his resume just because he didn't get the opportunity. There is no indication that his offense would have been better had he been playing on a worse team and getting better minutes. You can make the same argument that Krushelnyski suffered from the same thing, being buried on the Edmonton depth chart.(I'm not going to support this because I don't agree with its logic.) Why goals? We're looking at the player as a whole offensively, and points certainly gives a better indication of that. A goals comparison punishes Krushelnyski for being a better playmaker than goalscorer. I don't think it's fair to remove Krushelnyski's best season considering he didn't play exclusively with Gretzky the entire year. Discount it sure, but unless we know exactly how much he played with Gretzky, we don't know how much it should be discounted. But for comparisons sake, let's do what you say and remove that entire season.

Adjusted goals/game

Krushelnyski: .20
Pronovost: .16

Okay, they're closer. But Krushelnyski is still clearly better. Here are their adjusted PPG with Pronovost's number of games thing being factored in:

Adjusted PPG

Krushelnyski: .5229
Pronovost: .3486

That's a significant advantage offensively, especially considering the fact that they were both playing in the same role during the majority of their careers, the 3rd line. If Krushelnyski was a 1st liner and Pronovost a 3rd liner this would be different, but considering they were playing in the same role most of the time, yet Krushelnyski was that much better, the difference is significant.

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08-18-2011, 06:27 PM
  #70
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Billy, did you use adjusted points per adjusted game this time?

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08-18-2011, 06:36 PM
  #71
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Billy, did you use adjusted points per adjusted game this time?
Yes, I adjusted Pronovost's games played and it came out to 633.84 and I rounded up to 684 in order to not overstate his offensive abilities.

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08-18-2011, 07:45 PM
  #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BiLLY_ShOE1721 View Post
No doubt, Pronovost is definitely a few pegs higher in terms of defensive play over Krush.



Color me unimpressed by being 27th in a 6 team league, let alone 35-43. Okay, he wasn't playing in a role that gave him a lot of opportunities to score goals because he was playing behind a bunch of better players. But just because of that, we can't add hypothetical offense to his resume just because he didn't get the opportunity. There is no indication that his offense would have been better had he been playing on a worse team and getting better minutes. You can make the same argument that Krushelnyski suffered from the same thing, being buried on the Edmonton depth chart.(I'm not going to support this because I don't agree with its logic.) Why goals? We're looking at the player as a whole offensively, and points certainly gives a better indication of that. A goals comparison punishes Krushelnyski for being a better playmaker than goalscorer. I don't think it's fair to remove Krushelnyski's best season considering he didn't play exclusively with Gretzky the entire year. Discount it sure, but unless we know exactly how much he played with Gretzky, we don't know how much it should be discounted. But for comparisons sake, let's do what you say and remove that entire season.

Adjusted goals/game

Krushelnyski: .20
Pronovost: .16

Okay, they're closer. But Krushelnyski is still clearly better. Here are their adjusted PPG with Pronovost's number of games thing being factored in:

Adjusted PPG

Krushelnyski: .5229
Pronovost: .3486

That's a significant advantage offensively, especially considering the fact that they were both playing in the same role during the majority of their careers, the 3rd line. If Krushelnyski was a 1st liner and Pronovost a 3rd liner this would be different, but considering they were playing in the same role most of the time, yet Krushelnyski was that much better, the difference is significant.
Krushelnyski at the beginning of his career (his 3rd best points season, then his 3rd best goals season) he was a top line forward and was considered a rising star (Pelletier). Edmonton acquired him to play with Gretzky and he played there his entire first season (the big year). Starting in 1985-86, he began a lower line forward (LOH).

I have found on multiple blogs that I'm not going to reference on this site as full on actual sources statements like this: "Mike Krushelnyski peaked on the Gretzky line, having his only 30-goal season in 1984-85. Krushelnyski scored a career-high 43, as Gretzky led the league in assists." I've also found game logs of him playing with Gretzky as of Jan. 1985

He also played with Gretzky right after coming over to Los Angeles with him, which is his third best offensive season. The LA Times has articles in 1989 preseason talking about replacing Krushelnyski on the Gretzky line from the previous year.

So in other words, two of his top 3 offensive seasons were product of Gretzky. The other he was in the top 6 of Boston, and then his third best goals season were in Boston. I still think Krushelnyski is the better offensive player. But it's much closer than you're making it out to be.

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08-19-2011, 05:43 PM
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2nd PK units are an advantage to Pittsburgh. I don't feel like going in depth, but I think it's obvious.

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08-19-2011, 05:52 PM
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Since it seems like voting is going to be going on soon, I'll offer my closing remarks as to why Philadelphia is the superior team:

-Better goaltending. Puppa has better Vezina and All Star voting records, and when you factor in the system that Roloson was playing in in Minnesota that padded his numbers, I think Puppa boasts the better GAA and SV% finishes as well.
-Better 2nd line both offensively and defensively. Our 3rd line is also better offensively.
-1st line is better defensively while not being that far behind offensively.
-We have the best forward in the series in Bob McDougall.
-We have(in my opinion) the best defenseman in the series in Phat Wilson. If he's not the best defenseman, he's easily the best offensive defenseman. In conjunction with this, we have the superior top pairing, especially in terms of offense.
-Superior 2nd PP unit, and 1st PK unit.
-Better defensive play from our top 6, which will give us the advantage in the matchups. We're comfortable with pretty much every matchup, whereas the Pittsburgh 1st line is rather weak defensively. Shepelev is a negative defensively, Himes is decent, and Babych is average as well.

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08-21-2011, 12:49 AM
  #75
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Admirable job by Billy in comparing the components. Sorry I couldn't contribute, as I have been (and am still) in the midst of a cross-country move that has pretty much eliminated my online time.

Thanks to seventieslord and vecens for sticking up for my team a bit in my absence.

Reasons I believe Pittsburgh can win this series:

Balanced scoring - all four lines have offensive upside. There is no "defense only" or pure "energy" line. At the same time, both my 3rd and 4th lines will be a pain in the neck to play against.

Playoff goaltending - Both Roloson and Gilbert led their teams to deep runs in the Stanley Cup playoffs, at times playing lights out to carry their teams to victory. Playoff hockey won't faze them.

Coaching: Al McNeil's record of success at the highest level of hockey speaks for itself.

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