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Old
08-17-2011, 03:00 AM
  #26
noobman
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Originally Posted by Wilch View Post
And I mean the people who started after they've stuck to a sport for a while, so generally 17+. I'm just taking my skating lessons right now, and I'm 22. Was wondering how long it took you guys to become a competent skater? I try to practice skating whenever I can (about 2-3 times a week, 1.5 hour or so each time).
If you've just started at 22, I'd imagine that you can pick things up pretty quickly.

Once you can skate forwards and backwards, turn and do crossovers both ways, pivot, and STOP, you can start playing hockey. Of course, to become better you're going to have to learn new things... backwards crossovers, tight turns, etc etc. At some point you're going to want to start working on speed, acceleration, agility, balance, etc etc.

Skating is one of those aspects of your game that can *always* use improvement. You could always be a better skater.

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08-17-2011, 03:01 AM
  #27
Wilch
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I learned how to skate a year ago. Started goaltending as well, played only shinny and averaged 2x a week (since school ended 3x a week), and now i'm competent enough to compete for a spot on a Jr. C team.

As for skating I can only skate backwards via C cuts, no cross over yet. Going forward i can only cross over to the left, and not to the right as well.
Wow. Sounds like if I can get hockey stops, transition and backwards skating down I can start playing eh?

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08-17-2011, 03:12 AM
  #28
Wilch
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Originally Posted by noobman View Post
If you've just started at 22, I'd imagine that you can pick things up pretty quickly.

Once you can skate forwards and backwards, turn and do crossovers both ways, pivot, and STOP, you can start playing hockey. Of course, to become better you're going to have to learn new things... backwards crossovers, tight turns, etc etc. At some point you're going to want to start working on speed, acceleration, agility, balance, etc etc.

Skating is one of those aspects of your game that can *always* use improvement. You could always be a better skater.
Thanks, I'll be work on the things you mentioned.

I have a question for you guys though... I can sort of do a one foot hockey stop with either leg... But I seem to need to slide for a while before coming to a complete stop. Anyone know if this is a sign that I'm doing something wrong? I can immediately come to a complete stop if I only take a single stride, anything more I slide a bit more.

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08-17-2011, 03:14 AM
  #29
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I started skating probably about a year and a half ago and actually started playing hockey almost a year ago.
In my old club most of the guys playing were pretty limited skating wise, a few of them could barely stop and couldn't skate backwards so I was fortunate that even after a short time learning I was never the worst out there and was actually one of the quickest.
What I will say is work hard on getting things working both ways (I.e Stopping Left & Right, Crossovers Left & Right) as it is something I have never really been able to put the time into and it has really affected my playing

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08-17-2011, 03:43 AM
  #30
Wilch
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Originally Posted by Maccas View Post
I started skating probably about a year and a half ago and actually started playing hockey almost a year ago.
In my old club most of the guys playing were pretty limited skating wise, a few of them could barely stop and couldn't skate backwards so I was fortunate that even after a short time learning I was never the worst out there and was actually one of the quickest.
What I will say is work hard on getting things working both ways (I.e Stopping Left & Right, Crossovers Left & Right) as it is something I have never really been able to put the time into and it has really affected my playing
I forgot to mention one thing, I spend quite a bit of time in Shanghai/Taipei right now, so there's not a lot of hockey players to start with. While there probably aren't any rec leagues here that can compete with the rec leagues in North America, I don't think there are any beginner level leagues either. It's probably all around intermediate level... Unless of course they let me play pee-wee hockey with the 12 year olds, then I'd have to put some work into my skating before I make that jump.

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08-17-2011, 06:40 AM
  #31
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I didn't say it was the case for anyone else, just that's what worked for me. I know what you mean though. Sadly there's not a lot of practice to be had here. There's only one sticktime session a week and it's packed with no room to do anything very useful.
I hear you. Gotta use the little time we get constructively. There's also off-ice shooting and stick handling.

I'm lucky enough to be off Fridays at the moment. Once the kiddies go back to school the local open hockeys will be pretty much empty

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08-17-2011, 06:47 AM
  #32
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The key to going to a stick & puck time is to bust you arse out there. Don't lolligag around, shooting the puck softly. That's what 90% do. Do skating drills, shooting drills, skate/pass and a shot drills to mimic game situations and skate as hard as you are capable of. When you shoot, shoot as hard as you can. Bury that puck in the net. Watch drills on youtube or buy a drills book and take it with you and do them. Doing them as hard and fast as you can will push you so when those faster and harder times occur in a game it is now instinctive. If there any adult skills classes take them. Coach will run you ragged. Or bring a friend to stick n puck to be your personal drill sergeant to make sure you push yourself.
I could not agree more. This is how you really get better. However, it's not fun which is why most guys don't do it. They play 3-4 mens league/ pickup games a week and never get past that intermediate level.

It's all in what you want. No guts no glory.

To the adult skills classes. I'm having trouble finding anything besides "beginner" classes.

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08-17-2011, 12:05 PM
  #33
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Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
To the adult skills classes. I'm having trouble finding anything besides "beginner" classes.
Private lessons maybe? I actually have a (cute!) coach all lined up and I'm going to have him give me some lessons after my class is all done. Ask around at the rink about coaches, or chat them up if you see them giving lessons at s&p. If you have some friends that are interested in lessons, too, then you can arrange for a small group lesson and save some money that way.

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08-17-2011, 03:51 PM
  #34
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I'm in the same boat. I grew up playing pond hockey but never competitively so my skills are much lower. I went to college at the University of Denver where literally everyone grew up playing hockey. I played a lot of pond out here, got a little better with help and pointers from my friends, and actually fully suited up for my first time and played an intramural game. It was fun but I was definitely one of the worst kids on the ice.

I plan to try and improve my skills a lot more the coming year because I would love to play in a low-competition mens league at some point.

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08-17-2011, 03:54 PM
  #35
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Well, I started last year at 14 and now I'm pretty good at skating. I'm not the fastest, but I can outskate a few people. You'll get the hang of it between 1 and 2 years.

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08-18-2011, 11:26 AM
  #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilch View Post
I forgot to mention one thing, I spend quite a bit of time in Shanghai/Taipei right now, so there's not a lot of hockey players to start with. While there probably aren't any rec leagues here that can compete with the rec leagues in North America, I don't think there are any beginner level leagues either. It's probably all around intermediate level... Unless of course they let me play pee-wee hockey with the 12 year olds, then I'd have to put some work into my skating before I make that jump.
There's actually a great amount of hockey in Taipei, I just moved to Toronto from there, and it looks like I'll be playing less hockey here in TO somehow. Certainly having less fun playing hockey in any case. Irony eh?

That said, yeah, it was a pretty high level relative to beginners. If you speak Chinese though, there are clubs you can join in Taipei that have lots of beginners. Or even if you don't speak Chinese, you could join I'm sure. Next time you're in Taipei, go to the Bauer shop on Aiguo Rd and Roosevelt Rd, across from the Cheng Kai Shek Memorial Hall. They can help you out in finding a place there. Or just go to the arena at nanjing and dunhua rd during public skating hours and ask there. 9am to 9pm monday to saturday. Hell, ask anyone there anytime of day who looks like they're there to play hockey, and they'll know someone or something about clubs to join.

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08-18-2011, 12:26 PM
  #37
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Originally Posted by kr580 View Post
Sadly there's not a lot of practice to be had here. There's only one sticktime session a week and it's packed with no room to do anything very useful.
It's usefull no matter how many people are out there. Pick a corner or little spot along the boards. You can get an intense workout in a very small space. I do some freestyle practice where I cut really sharp, stick-handle, cut again. Or try stops and starts with the puck in that tight area, imagining battling in the corner or cycling from the corner. I notice some of the younger kids fade out early and by the end of a session you may have more room.

One advantage to starting as an adult is having a mature mind and a certain consciousness that children do not have. I grew up playing my whole childhood, had a LONG hiatus, and have now returned to the game. I appreciate and think so much more about the game, I am sure I've surpassed what I was doing at 18. Some of us who played never thought twice about it or watched NHL games enough. As an adult I think you can advance much quicker than a child.

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08-18-2011, 03:48 PM
  #38
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I love reading stories about people just starting to play. It takes me back

I've been playing for my 6th year now (ice, I'm 30). Its all relative how fast you'll pick it up. But you should be on the ice 3 x a week at least. Just FYI, you'll never skate as good as you'll want to. At least thats how I feel. I'm pretty good now, but I can always get better.

You may want to consider a workout plan too. You can have perfect skating form but if you have no muscle to push, you'll never get that explosiveness that is soooooo important in our sport....unless you're hella tall....which I'm not.

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08-18-2011, 06:45 PM
  #39
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Originally Posted by Wilch View Post
And I mean the people who started after they've stuck to a sport for a while, so generally 17+. I'm just taking my skating lessons right now, and I'm 22. Was wondering how long it took you guys to become a competent skater? I try to practice skating whenever I can (about 2-3 times a week, 1.5 hour or so each time).
I learned how to skate when I was 13, and I started hockey at 14. It took me around 5 months of skating lessons to learn all the proper technique and how to skate decently fast. I started my first season of hockey in the fall, also while doing powerskating once a week, and going for free ice whenever I could. I have found that as you could of guess, the more ice time the better. It really helped me as a late starter in to hockey.

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08-18-2011, 08:43 PM
  #40
Wilch
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Originally Posted by Injektilo View Post
There's actually a great amount of hockey in Taipei, I just moved to Toronto from there, and it looks like I'll be playing less hockey here in TO somehow. Certainly having less fun playing hockey in any case. Irony eh?

That said, yeah, it was a pretty high level relative to beginners. If you speak Chinese though, there are clubs you can join in Taipei that have lots of beginners. Or even if you don't speak Chinese, you could join I'm sure. Next time you're in Taipei, go to the Bauer shop on Aiguo Rd and Roosevelt Rd, across from the Cheng Kai Shek Memorial Hall. They can help you out in finding a place there. Or just go to the arena at nanjing and dunhua rd during public skating hours and ask there. 9am to 9pm monday to saturday. Hell, ask anyone there anytime of day who looks like they're there to play hockey, and they'll know someone or something about clubs to join.
Haha wow, I didn't know they had a Bauer shop in Taipei! I will go check it out there... Hopefully they have a decent range of hockey gear there

And I do speak Chinese, so I'll definitely ask around when I go back. I'm currently in Shanghai right now.

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08-19-2011, 02:31 AM
  #41
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Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
To the adult skills classes. I'm having trouble finding anything besides "beginner" classes.
Don't be afraid of beginner classes. There are usually a wide variety of skill levels out there, and the coach should be able to work with you. If you're unsure, go to one, and if it's too basic don't go back. But if you're just starting hockey and have not yet mastered all the skating basics, you're quite certainly a beginner.

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08-21-2011, 08:36 AM
  #42
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I'm 14, been playing for 2 years, I'm pretty happy with how my skating has developed, but it's still not good enough, I want to keep getting better every year. Then when I make the NHL, I'll be ready!

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08-21-2011, 11:02 PM
  #43
Guffaw
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Don't be afraid of beginner classes. There are usually a wide variety of skill levels out there, and the coach should be able to work with you. If you're unsure, go to one, and if it's too basic don't go back. But if you're just starting hockey and have not yet mastered all the skating basics, you're quite certainly a beginner.
Thanks. No not just starting. I've skated for ~8-9 years of my life. My issue is that I was a goalie for all but 2 of those years and so I never received formal instruction as a player. Things like positioning, faceoffs, strategy, breakouts, protecting the puck, dekes, etc. etc. My skating is probably my strongest skill.

I will likely check out an adult skills clinic if I can find one. Like you said, pay for one session. If it's a bunch of guys with their ankles touching the ice and geared toward beginners then I'll probably pass.

It's hard to find what I'm looking for. I guess because once adults get to the intermediate level they are content just playing games. I can already play in men's leagues. I want to be the best player on the ice. There's a difference.

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08-22-2011, 07:46 AM
  #44
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I started playing ice hockey when I was 16-17. It took me about a month just to learn how to stop and maybe 9 months-a year to learn how to skate well enough to keep up with people in rec leagues. If your skating is really bad, I would suggest you practice by just rollerblading. I used to roller blade a lot as a kid and it really helped in my transition to skating. I'm still not that great at moving backwards and turning while moving backwards but I can do well enough to pass at defense with guys in their 30s-40s who have been playing hockey their whole lives. I know I'll never be that great but I'm fast enough to keep up with some of the fastest in a straight line and can maneuver pretty well moving forward. Just still have those problems going backwards but I blame that on my lack of experience on defense, I almost never play defense.

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08-22-2011, 09:19 AM
  #45
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I probably started later than anyone here. I started earlier this year and I'm 43. I work from home and have the freedom of doing what I want when I want so I took the 3x a week skating class then the beginners adult hockey class afterwards. I also do stick and puck in the early morning when there is hardly anyone around.

I've signed up for a 40 and over no contact league next month. I hope I don't suck too much. I'm really nervous, but think I might not be that bad. I've always been athletic and played baseball from hs to college to adult leagues and played in bball leagues so I consider myself to be a decent athlete. My only problem is that I have bad ankles and I am not that big.

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