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Help on getting puck off boards in defensive zone: Winger

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Old
09-06-2011, 06:33 PM
  #26
Stickmata
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Here's my $.02 OP. If I'm still in motion as the puck get's rimmed around, I pick it up with my stick. If I've stopped at the hash marks, I present my stick for a tape to tape pass and, if the puck winds up getting rimmed around, I use my skates as others have described, angling my up-ice skate and directing the puck to my stick. What I never do is actually set up stopped facing the boards or try to spin from a butt-to-boards position around to facing the boards once the puck is in motion.

And the skate-re-direct move takes practice to get good at. My buddy and I practice this a lot when we do open skates.

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09-06-2011, 09:37 PM
  #27
Guffaw
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Originally Posted by Stickmata View Post
Here's my $.02 OP. If I'm still in motion as the puck get's rimmed around, I pick it up with my stick. If I've stopped at the hash marks, I present my stick for a tape to tape pass and, if the puck winds up getting rimmed around, I use my skates as others have described, angling my up-ice skate and directing the puck to my stick. What I never do is actually set up stopped facing the boards or try to spin from a butt-to-boards position around to facing the boards once the puck is in motion.

And the skate-re-direct move takes practice to get good at. My buddy and I practice this a lot when we do open skates.
I'm not saying anyone else is wrong, but what you said is the simplest and makes the most sense to me. The advice of "practice" is great and has truth, but practice what? I need a starting point no matter how simple. I'm going to work on what you suggest. Unfortunately all my "friends" only want to play games and shoot so I'll have to work on this during pickup or in games when the situation presents itself.

Last night,out of habit, I tried to deflect the puck up to my stick with the skate closest to the goal line at 90 degrees...another turnover

Thanks for the help.

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09-07-2011, 10:43 AM
  #28
Jarick
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Simplest starting point would be to just stop the puck with your skate or blade, don't try to deflect it, just kill it against the boards. Better to have possession of the puck than turn it over to their defense or ice it (unless you're tired).

Are you playing wing on only one side or both? If it's one side, what hand are you and what side do you play?

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09-07-2011, 01:02 PM
  #29
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Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
I'm not saying anyone else is wrong, but what you said is the simplest and makes the most sense to me. The advice of "practice" is great and has truth, but practice what? I need a starting point no matter how simple. I'm going to work on what you suggest. Unfortunately all my "friends" only want to play games and shoot so I'll have to work on this during pickup or in games when the situation presents itself.

Last night,out of habit, I tried to deflect the puck up to my stick with the skate closest to the goal line at 90 degrees...another turnover

Thanks for the help.

Stopping the puck with your foot should only be an option if you don't have a stick in your hamd. Nothing good will come from it ever unless you are skilled enough to be able to angle the puck with your skate to your stick and even that puts the puck in a vulnerable place to get it stolen.

Even if you stop the puck with your foot with your butt to the boards you still have to take the time to turn around and get it with your stick before you can do anything and you will then be facing the wrong way.

If you want something to practice and you have someone who can shoot the puck around the boards to you go to the the boards at the hashmarks. With your butt to the boards and in a position to accept a pass, have the puck railed around the boards. Turn quickly (counter clockwise from left wing, clockwise from right) and move a foot or two from the boards and stop facing square to the blue line. Stop the puck with your stick blade with the toe on the boards and the heel just a bit back from 90 degrees toward the goal line. You might be on your backhand but just keep practicing it and you will get it. Do that move over and over till you get it down before you start with moving the puck.

Once you can stop it regularly you will already be in a position to move the puck in multiple directions. You can make a pass to your center breaking up the middle splitting their pointmen. You can carry it toward the point and bank it off the boards to yourself or a teammate ahead of you. You can make a pass to the top of the circle to your defenseman if he keeps skating after unloading the puck. Or send it back to the defenseman if he becomes open again.

I know it will feel odd to turn your back to the puck but this will get easier and it allows you to quickly survey the ice so that you will have an idea what to do with the puck when you get it and you won't have to stand there with the puck while a defender charges at you.

Just keep practicing the turn and stop the puck, over and over. Then you can add a piece at a time after that. You also need to talk to your linemates and make a plan with each of them. Let your center know that if it gets railed around that you want him to break and split the defensemen. Let your defenseman know that if he rails the puck up at you to get his butt in gear and skate through the faceoff circle to get a pass or stop and go behind the net so you can come back to him and set up a breakout. If they keep skating, even if you fumble the puck a little you will still have options and know where they will be. If the center keeps going he will either take the defenseman with him into the neutral zone and open the ice for you or he will be free for you to chip the puck off the glass and send him on his way. If you pass to the breaking defenseman just play his position until you get control in the offensive zone and can switch back.

Just think of it in pieces and it will be easier when you finally implement the whole process.

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09-07-2011, 01:58 PM
  #30
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Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
I'm not saying anyone else is wrong, but what you said is the simplest and makes the most sense to me. The advice of "practice" is great and has truth, but practice what? I need a starting point no matter how simple. I'm going to work on what you suggest. Unfortunately all my "friends" only want to play games and shoot so I'll have to work on this during pickup or in games when the situation presents itself.

Last night,out of habit, I tried to deflect the puck up to my stick with the skate closest to the goal line at 90 degrees...another turnover

Thanks for the help.
Yeah, it does take two guys, so you gotta convince someone to work with you. Every open skate I do with my buddy, we spend about 10 minutes working on this. We each take a position on the hash marks on opposite sides and rim the puck hard around the boards behind the net to each other. I work mostly on the angle of my skate, as my problem is the opposite of yours. Too often I stay too square and just stop the puck instead of getting it to cleanly come off to my stick. However, that has made me focus on using my feet better. I've gotten a lot better at kicking the puck up to my stick when this happens, which is the right way to do it, rather than what most new players do when the puck is in their skates, which is spin their entire bodies so they can pick the puck up with their stick.

Oh and never, ever use the skate closest to the goal line to do this. Always use the skate closest to the blue line. Your goal line side skate should be off the boards.

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09-08-2011, 01:50 AM
  #31
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Originally Posted by Steelhead16 View Post
Stopping the puck with your foot should only be an option if you don't have a stick in your hamd. Nothing good will come from it ever unless you are skilled enough to be able to angle the puck with your skate to your stick and even that puts the puck in a vulnerable place to get it stolen.

Even if you stop the puck with your foot with your butt to the boards you still have to take the time to turn around and get it with your stick before you can do anything and you will then be facing the wrong way.

If you want something to practice and you have someone who can shoot the puck around the boards to you go to the the boards at the hashmarks. With your butt to the boards and in a position to accept a pass, have the puck railed around the boards. Turn quickly (counter clockwise from left wing, clockwise from right) and move a foot or two from the boards and stop facing square to the blue line. Stop the puck with your stick blade with the toe on the boards and the heel just a bit back from 90 degrees toward the goal line. You might be on your backhand but just keep practicing it and you will get it. Do that move over and over till you get it down before you start with moving the puck.

Once you can stop it regularly you will already be in a position to move the puck in multiple directions. You can make a pass to your center breaking up the middle splitting their pointmen. You can carry it toward the point and bank it off the boards to yourself or a teammate ahead of you. You can make a pass to the top of the circle to your defenseman if he keeps skating after unloading the puck. Or send it back to the defenseman if he becomes open again.

I know it will feel odd to turn your back to the puck but this will get easier and it allows you to quickly survey the ice so that you will have an idea what to do with the puck when you get it and you won't have to stand there with the puck while a defender charges at you.

Just keep practicing the turn and stop the puck, over and over. Then you can add a piece at a time after that. You also need to talk to your linemates and make a plan with each of them. Let your center know that if it gets railed around that you want him to break and split the defensemen. Let your defenseman know that if he rails the puck up at you to get his butt in gear and skate through the faceoff circle to get a pass or stop and go behind the net so you can come back to him and set up a breakout. If they keep skating, even if you fumble the puck a little you will still have options and know where they will be. If the center keeps going he will either take the defenseman with him into the neutral zone and open the ice for you or he will be free for you to chip the puck off the glass and send him on his way. If you pass to the breaking defenseman just play his position until you get control in the offensive zone and can switch back.

Just think of it in pieces and it will be easier when you finally implement the whole process.
Thanks for the detailed explanation. I'm going to try my best to find someone to work with me on this.

Just so I'm clear. As a winger when my defensemen has possession of the puck behind our net I should be on the boards down by the hash marks, stick on the ice, and ideally getting the pass tape to tape on my forehand(right wing, right handed shot). If it comes up the boards follow the above.

If I'm a right handed shot playing left wing, butt on the boards at the hash marks, how am I trying to accept the tape to tape pass? On my backhand?

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09-08-2011, 09:54 AM
  #32
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Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
Thanks for the detailed explanation. I'm going to try my best to find someone to work with me on this.

Just so I'm clear. As a winger when my defensemen has possession of the puck behind our net I should be on the boards down by the hash marks, stick on the ice, and ideally getting the pass tape to tape on my forehand(right wing, right handed shot). If it comes up the boards follow the above.

If I'm a right handed shot playing left wing, butt on the boards at the hash marks, how am I trying to accept the tape to tape pass? On my backhand?
You are correct on the positioning. If you are taking a tape to tape pass on your off wing (stick toward the goal line) you ideally want your stick at 2:00 or 3:00 so that you can protect the puck after you get it. Then you are ready to hit your breaking center or if you are free to move it up yourself do that. If you are on the other side you will be ready to move or move the puck or another move to try if the defendeman pinches from the point you can just deflect the pass up off the boards like you were tipping a shot in front of the net.

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09-08-2011, 01:13 PM
  #33
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Originally Posted by Steelhead16 View Post
You are correct on the positioning. If you are taking a tape to tape pass on your off wing (stick toward the goal line) you ideally want your stick at 2:00 or 3:00 so that you can protect the puck after you get it. Then you are ready to hit your breaking center or if you are free to move it up yourself do that. If you are on the other side you will be ready to move or move the puck or another move to try if the defendeman pinches from the point you can just deflect the pass up off the boards like you were tipping a shot in front of the net.
Breaking centers. The white tigers of adult rec league hockey. Near mythical creatures, photographed occasionally but rarely seen live by humans.

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09-08-2011, 02:34 PM
  #34
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Breaking centers. The white tigers of adult rec league hockey. Near mythical creatures, photographed occasionally but rarely seen live by humans.
I hear ya. I coach high school though so if I don't see them now and again it gets crowded next to me on the bench.

When I used to play in adult leagues and forwards didn't hustle I would just chip the puck down to the other end but not across the goal line just to make them skate the whole length of the ice a bunch. It didn't make them hustle anymore but it was amusing for me.

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09-08-2011, 02:40 PM
  #35
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Unfortunately, very few adult rec players know how to play center properly. My son's PeeWee team runs a better break out than any of my adult teams ever have.

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09-08-2011, 09:56 PM
  #36
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Originally Posted by Steelhead16 View Post
I hear ya. I coach high school though so if I don't see them now and again it gets crowded next to me on the bench.

When I used to play in adult leagues and forwards didn't hustle I would just chip the puck down to the other end but not across the goal line just to make them skate the whole length of the ice a bunch. It didn't make them hustle anymore but it was amusing for me.
Sorry. I'm still a little confused if I'm a righty on the left wing. How am I trying to accept that tape to tape pass? Turn my body up ice and take it on the backhand or turn back toward the goal line and take it on the forehand?

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09-09-2011, 12:13 AM
  #37
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Originally Posted by Guffaw View Post
Sorry. I'm still a little confused if I'm a righty on the left wing. How am I trying to accept that tape to tape pass? Turn my body up ice and take it on the backhand or turn back toward the goal line and take it on the forehand?
If your butt is square to the boards on your off wing point the toe of your stick at the area behind the net (2:00ish). That way your stick is in a "neutral" position to receive a pass. If the puck comes to your right you yake the pass on your forehand. If a defender is coming at you you can swing your body off the boards and be able to get your body between the puck and the defender. If no defender you have the puck on your forehand and you are facing center ice in a perfect passing position.

If the pass comes across your body to your left you can take the pass on your backhand and be facing the point with the puck on your stick. Then you can either skate with it, pass it up or back or skate up a little with it and chip it off the boards or off the glass. Or if all hell breaks loose you always have the option to tie the puck up along the boards if the rest of your team goes braindead.

If you notice, none of these situations puts you in a position so that the puck bounces off your skates and in front of the net for a goal. Hockey is a very physical game but successful players and teams are usually smarter than their opponent. Your team can have less skill than your opponent but if you can limit your mistakes and put yourself in good positions to take advantage of your opponent's mistakes you can beat better players and better teams.

The biggest mistake I see in adult league hockey is that guys only play when they are on the ice. But they spend more than half the game on the bench and they waste that time messing around and drinking water, getting ice off their blades, etc... Use that time on the bench to take mental notes on the other teams players. If you know what your opponent is going to do you have a huge advantage. If you know a guy can't turn a certain direction very well or he can only turn from skating fowards to backwards one direction then you know where you need to go against him. You seem really eager to learn the game from a mental standpoint which is great because the best way to make the game easier is to be able to slow it down in your mind. Eventually you will have an idea or two of what to do in every situation before it happens and then it will really get fun.

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09-09-2011, 07:22 AM
  #38
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Originally Posted by noobman View Post
Are we talking about the same thing here?

It's fine to be standing a little bit away from the boards (that's what I do), but if you're facing the side boards what are you going to do with the puck? You can't see what's happening because your face is in glass, and by the time you look to see what's happening you're covered. When I learned to play we were told that it's better to skate for the puck than it is to stand and wait for it to get to you, and that you shouldn't keep your back to the play on a breakout unless you're quickly turning.

As a left shot on LW, I'll try to control a hard ream up the boards on my backhand while skating forward, or turn into the boards to receive the puck and quickly skate down low before curling and making a pass or clearing.

It's hard to explain in words.


If you read my entire post, you'll notice that I suggest grabbing the puck with your feet moving. Hard to do anchored against the boards with your butt against the wall, but for a beginner it is a good strategy, and it's what many coaches and hockey schools teach.


I would figure that someone trying to figure out how to position themselves on a breakout is playing at a low level.



I do watch the pros. They generally try to stand parallel to the boards so as to be able to keep an eye on the entire zone. They can see what's ahead of them and what's behind them.
If you skate back towards the goal line in your own end as a winger with the puck you're going to be **** on by your coaches hahaha.

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09-09-2011, 07:28 AM
  #39
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Thanks so much for the advice. I think I've got the gist of it now. There are MANY aspects of the game I don't understand, but this was the most glaring as I'm really having trouble getting out of the zone at best and at worst turning the puck over and costing my team goals.

Your assessment is correct. I've only skated out(non goalie position) for a total of 2 1/2 years of my life and I'll be 39 next month. I've never received any coaching or instruction on how to play the game as a player. While the players I'm going against are sometimes older, slower, and in not quite as good a shape, most of them have 20,30, and sometimes 40 years of playing experience, coaching, and camps behind them so I'm way behind the curve.

I love the game and really want to learn to be a good two way player and so I'm going at it from all angles. Conditioning, skills, positioning, strategy, etc. so hopefully that will gradually start to pay dividends on the ice.

Thanks a lot for the help.

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09-11-2011, 09:57 PM
  #40
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i like to use my stick to corral the puck off the boards. this will generally result in a goal as well.

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09-11-2011, 09:58 PM
  #41
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Originally Posted by RockinRiles View Post
i like to use my stick to corral the puck off the boards. this will generally result in a goal as well.
i've actually played a lot of soccer as well as ice hockey. using your feet is an underrated tactic. everyone expects the stick, but if you go in with the skate no one will see it coming. 2 ez

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09-11-2011, 10:47 PM
  #42
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If you skate back towards the goal line in your own end as a winger with the puck you're going to be **** on by your coaches hahaha.
Obviously you're not going to skate all the way to the red line. If you're between the blueline and the hash marks and take a few steps back before curling around, you'll be fine. It's called doing a tight turn. Nobody in their right mind is going to loop behind the net.

If skating into a defenseman ready to lay you out or throwing the puck onto the opponent's stick is the only alternative, there's nothing wrong with it. I did it a lot back when I played competitive as a teenager and I never once got ripped on for it.

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