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Best way to build speed?

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Old
09-30-2011, 07:05 PM
  #1
GodsARangerFan
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Best way to build speed?

Im slow as frozen molasses. How do I get faster? I play ice and roller and get burned in both. Thoughts?

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09-30-2011, 07:27 PM
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Rebels21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GodsARangerFan View Post
Im slow as frozen molasses. How do I get faster? I play ice and roller and get burned in both. Thoughts?
You should join another sports team. My friend is a D1 athlete at Michigan as a coxswain. he has the fastest feet of all time

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09-30-2011, 08:02 PM
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BIitz
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Skate treadmill helped me build speed. I'd say stronger legs so you have more powerful/explosive strides. Leg weights and squats might help. I can't say for certain what muscles you'd have to work on though.

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09-30-2011, 08:45 PM
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mbhhofr
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Pick out the fastest skaters during games and watch them. You can learn a lot by observing others. I sure did and I was fast. I never had a lesson. I would referee a Jr. game Sunday afternoon and go public skating that night. Try and get on the ice as often as you can to try different styles and improve your speed.

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09-30-2011, 08:50 PM
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mbhhofr
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Originally Posted by mbhhofr View Post
Pick out the fastest skaters during games and watch them. You can learn a lot by observing others. I sure did and I was fast. I never had a lesson. I would referee a Jr. game Sunday afternoon and go public skating that night. Try and get on the ice as often as you can to try different styles and improve your speed.
I might also say to bend your knees and also bend forward at your waist. Better balance means better speed.

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10-01-2011, 02:50 AM
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DJnet65
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The biggest reason players have for not being fast is poor skating technique. It's hard to help you improve if we can't see you skate.

Getting into a power skating class or finding a good skating coach will be able to help you identify where you stride needs to improve.

Alot of the effort you put into your skating is wasted because you don't have an efficient skating stride.

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10-01-2011, 02:54 AM
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Wilch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DJnet65 View Post
The biggest reason players have for not being fast is poor skating technique. It's hard to help you improve if we can't see you skate.

Getting into a power skating class or finding a good skating coach will be able to help you identify where you stride needs to improve.

Alot of the effort you put into your skating is wasted because you don't have an efficient skating stride.
That.

When I do public skating the fastest skaters happen to be the ones who skate most effortlessly. Getting your techniques right can mean a world of difference.

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10-01-2011, 03:32 AM
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Sojourn
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Technique and plyometrics.

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10-01-2011, 09:05 AM
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Guffaw
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Like others have said I can't speak to technique because I can't see you skate.

Some universal things:
1) Leg strength/power-squats, lunges, etc. This will help you build the muscle you'll need for powerful strides.

2) Flexibility-will help you achieve full range of motion. You can't execute a proper stride if you can't flex/extend as much as you need to.

3) Explosiveness/quick feet-Plyometrics, sprints, agility drills

4) Lose some weight if you need to. The more weight your legs are trying to move the slower you'll be.

I just started getting into this stuff when I sprained my knee so haven't reaped the benefits yet. This of course wont help your technique, but will maximize whatever technique you are using.

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10-02-2011, 08:13 PM
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Mithrandir
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The obvious is technique. If you can't afford skating lessons, which is reasonable, try watching some power skating videos and then trying to keep the things you've watched in mind when you're on the ice.

Additionally, there's leg strength and explosiveness to work on and, the one that I find new/poor skaters are often getting wrong without realizing:

Skates are TOO big. Skates that are too big can never be tightened enough. Your skates should be at least 2 sizes smaller than your shoes, usually. Additionally, properly fitting skates can be too loose, which will hurt your speed, or too soft, which will also hurt your speed. Skates need to be TIGHT and decently stiff if you're going to make use of the strength and technique that you have.


If your skates fit correctly (they might feel good to you, but that doesn't make them correct - just make sure they're fitted properly), are tightened adequately and aren't a bottom of the barrel, soft as baby poop boot, than it's time to look more in-depthly at technique and strength. Skating has always been a strong-suit for me and when I played college hockey, my seated leg-press was around 750lbs. I'll still do 550ish from time to time, but I don't have any motivation to put that kind of strain on myself anymore. Bulk without explosiveness, however, won't help you, so if you're going to start with squats and leg presses, make sure to do exercises that incorporate jumping and other quick twitch reactions.


Last edited by Mithrandir: 10-02-2011 at 08:21 PM.
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Old
10-03-2011, 11:09 AM
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OvenChicken8
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You need to find your effortless skating stride (everyone has a different one).
Losing some weight will help.
Working on your edge work and balance.
Plyometric training.
Testing different skate sharpness. Guys like Modano used an extremely dull blade, where players like Cogliano uses a very sharp blade.

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10-06-2011, 10:45 PM
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Noir
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Edges.

When you push (for a stride), do you feel a lot of traction on your skate edge?

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10-07-2011, 11:23 AM
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Stickmata
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir View Post
Edges.

When you push (for a stride), do you feel a lot of traction on your skate edge?
While only part of the equation, this ^. Every time I get on the ice I do a series or alternating one skate edge C turms and loooonng stride extensions, just to get my mind on proper stride and use of the edge. I find that sometimes when I try to hard and move my feet too fast, I'm actually not using my edges right and not striding long enough and I actually go slower. I've found that technique is more important than rushing my feet.

The other thing I think a lot of people overlook is their blade profile. After a lot of sharpenings my skate had gotten really rounded, to about a 6-7 profile and with a lot of rocker front and back. I'm 6'2" and wear a 10 skate and that was a profile for a PeeWee. I could turn and pivot very quick but I had lost so much speed and couldn't figure out why. Put new blades on and had them profiled to a 9 and my god what a difference in stability and glide, with very little loss in turning. Felt like I had a new gear.

Back to the topic, I recommend taking a basic power skating class to make sure that your body position is right to begin with.

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10-07-2011, 11:31 AM
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know it all

Test

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10-07-2011, 12:53 PM
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technique, cadance and leg strength

If you get your technique down first, then the more you skate, the correct muscles will get stronger.

There are a few disputed techniques, but personally I like the principle of keeping a glide skate blade on the ice, in right direction , as much as you can, as it promtoes speed and control.

but simply put:
stay low, keeping the glide leg as close to 90 deg
pushing out to the side (not back obviously) with full extention (legs completely straight)
rock from heel to toe to finish each stridge, gives an added kick and you should hear a scrap at the end of your extention

work on cadance, and personally, I've become a very fast skater, by working on technique and cadance, rather than just effort

There is no benefit to pumping your legs with short strides outside of the start

fluid strong full extended strides with good timing and focus of weight appropately on the forefront of your glide foot in the right direction will give you speed.

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Old
10-07-2011, 08:05 PM
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ponder
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In addition to what has already been said, I think a HUGE part of in game speed comes from maintaining and gaining speed in turns, and to a certain extent from cardio. Skaters tend to be much more similar speed wise than you'd expect when going in a straight line (from a stop, when both are not tired). Seriously, try races from a stop at practice/stick and puck/whatever, there's not a big difference between guys who seem somewhat slow in game and guys who seem really fast in game (assuming the "slow" guys are still experienced skaters/hockey players, not noobs). You'll be surprised by how close you can stick with guys who seem like speed demons (again, when skating from a stop, in a straight line), and/or by how close slow skaters can stick with you. However, the slow guys generally make wide turns, lose a lot of speed during turns, and also tire easily, while the fast guys make tight turns, pick up a lot of speed during turns, and stay fresh longer (partly because they're more efficient skaters). Because you're constantly turning in hockey this makes them way faster in games, and they even SEEM way faster in a straight line because they come out of turns with speed before skating straight, while the worse skaters are often starting from a much slower speed.

Moral of the story, while you definitely want to get your forward stride right, you'll see much bigger speed gains by working on your turning/edges, that's really what makes a fast skater. Also, cardio is key, because a tired skater is a slow skater.

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Old
10-08-2011, 01:41 PM
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HockeyDonkey33
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A ton of good suggestions on here. Here is what I did after I stopped playing for a long time.
-Skate as often as you can, I go to open skates a lot and work on maintaining a fast pace for a long amount of time (10-15min).
- Like others said work on your turns, find your edge on turns and just keep trying to push it. Get lower, get tighter, fall down, get up and try again. Once you make that turn practice getting good burst strides out of the turn, that momentum can really generate a lot of speed.
- Practice the cross-over when doing turns, they really help to maintain speed and build it.
- Work on that explosiveness, find an open space or moment at open skates or S&P and just haul ass to the blue line or red line and stop, continue and repeat.
-PRACTICE STOPPING! Your mind will really limit your speed if you don't feel confident in your ability to stop. Hockey stops are one of the few things you can't do anywhere but on the ice. Always practice that and finding your edge. I always feel that you really can only go as fast as you feel you can stop safely.
- Keep your knees bent, you get a ton more explosiveness if you can use your whole body. It will also help you stay on balance more. Skating should use all of your legs, hips and core.
- Find videos for free on the web! Many many great sites and vids to help you become better. A site I use a lot is this HowToHockey
- Keep at it, and just practice

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10-08-2011, 02:11 PM
  #18
LatvianTwist
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I run track (400m) and ever since I began, my skating speed has more than doubled.

Sprinting helps a lot more than most people think, at least for me.

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