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Phoenix offering allergy-free suite for rent

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Old
10-26-2011, 11:37 AM
  #1
LadyStanley
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Phoenix offering allergy-free suite for rent

http://prohockeytalk.nbcsports.com/2...-suite-rentals

Offering sensitive families an opportunity to enjoy the game, without worrying about allergies.

No peanuts allowed. And food offered in this suite avoids the top 8 allergens.

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10-26-2011, 11:56 AM
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Im gonna walk right on past the front door of this thread. Have fun ya'll.

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10-26-2011, 01:06 PM
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Fehr Time*
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Originally Posted by LadyStanley View Post
http://prohockeytalk.nbcsports.com/2...-suite-rentals

Offering sensitive families an opportunity to enjoy the game, without worrying about allergies.

No peanuts allowed. And food offered in this suite avoids the top 8 allergens.
There are and will be even more snarky comments in this thread, but this is actually not the worst of ideas I guess. Some people these days are incredibly sensitive to these allergens and the slightest contact can lead to a life threatening anaphylactic reaction. It does no doubt prevent many sports fans from attending events. Not sure how many of them are Coyotes fans though.

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10-26-2011, 02:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Fehr Time View Post
There are and will be even more snarky comments in this thread, but this is actually not the worst of ideas I guess. Some people these days are incredibly sensitive to these allergens and the slightest contact can lead to a life threatening anaphylactic reaction. It does no doubt prevent many sports fans from attending events. Not sure how many of them are Coyotes fans though.

Very true. Peanut allergy is the most troublesome as far as severity of response.


The other factor is that incidence of food allergies is on the rise, even if correcting for better monitoring and testing, especially in children. One theory blames our global lifestyle (greater diversity of foods eaten, and at earlier ages), while another looks to the very sterile environment that we live in compared to earlier generations. With a lack of challenge for the immune system, the idea is that it goes hyper and looks for new targets, hence the rise in allergies and autoimmune diseases. Food for thought.

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10-26-2011, 02:08 PM
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Some of the rise also has to do with the reliance on blood tests that are notoriously unreliable when it comes to determining allergies. The only truly indicative tests are challenge tests (which are done in a medically controlled environment), but many parents would rather rely on scratch tests or blood tests that have a very high rate of false positive. That leads to a handful people absolutely believing they have the allergies when they've never really been tested for them.

All that said, there are absolutely legitimate allergies out there that can be life threatening, and this is not the worst idea in the world.

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10-26-2011, 02:08 PM
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It's a shame that this article is putting a marketing spin on this. This has nothing to do with marketing hockey to people in Phoenix, and it's the sort of thing that every arena should have.

People who suffer from life-threatening allergies have to take leaps of faith every day - at restaurants, at work, at social events, everywhere - that people take note of their conditions (if you were deathly allergic to seafood, would you just take it on faith that the server at a restaurant notified the chef to hold the shrimp, and that the cook thoroughly washed his workstation before preparing your meal? I sure as hell wouldn't!). If I suffered from severe allergies, I would trust a suite branded as allergy-free over any suite where I have to specify what I'm allergic to and hope that they remember to keep peanuts out of there.

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10-26-2011, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Fugu View Post
Very true. Peanut allergy is the most troublesome as far as severity of response.


The other factor is that incidence of food allergies is on the rise, even if correcting for better monitoring and testing, especially in children. One theory blames our global lifestyle (greater diversity of foods eaten, and at earlier ages), while another looks to the very sterile environment that we live in compared to earlier generations. With a lack of challenge for the immune system, the idea is that it goes hyper and looks for new targets, hence the rise in allergies and autoimmune diseases. Food for thought.
I thought peanut alergies were common knowledge, its very hard to find a school in ontario that is not peanut free. Idk what its like in other places.

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10-26-2011, 02:11 PM
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I think this is a good idea. They do have room in the arena to accommodate this, so why not? It certainly can't hurt.

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10-26-2011, 02:27 PM
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I thought peanut alergies were common knowledge, its very hard to find a school in ontario that is not peanut free. Idk what its like in other places.
This is a recent development. Health Canada in fact is even now reviewing standards/thresholds for the food industry, wrt to labeling laws. A few years ago, producers not only weren't held accountable for lack of clear identification of known allergens in foods, but could get away with blanket statements like "may contain".... well, if that's all it took to get rid of the liability, why wouldn't everyone just put that on all their labels? Allergy sufferers wouldn't be able to buy anything off the shelves.




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Originally Posted by Kritter471 View Post
Some of the rise also has to do with the reliance on blood tests that are notoriously unreliable when it comes to determining allergies. The only truly indicative tests are challenge tests (which are done in a medically controlled environment), but many parents would rather rely on scratch tests or blood tests that have a very high rate of false positive. That leads to a handful people absolutely believing they have the allergies when they've never really been tested for them.

All that said, there are absolutely legitimate allergies out there that can be life threatening, and this is not the worst idea in the world.
There are too many people who also confuse a food allergy with a food intolerance. A bit of bloating after milk isn't a food allergy. Allergies are immune-mediated, which means antibodies are directed against the offending protein. You can get the entire array of hives, itching, swelling to so much inflammation that you cannot breathe. I remember reading some stats where a quarter of the population thought they had a food allergy, but in reality it's more like 6-7% in children and 2-3% in adults, iirc.

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10-26-2011, 02:29 PM
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I have a peanut allergy and I really like stuff like this. Peanut allergies can be extremely serious and many people without one don't really recognize how bad it can be.

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There are too many people who also confuse a food allergy with a food intolerance. A bit of bloating after milk isn't a food allergy. Allergies are immune-mediated, which means antibodies are directed against the offending protein. You can get the entire array of hives, itching, swelling to so much inflammation that you cannot breathe. I remember reading some stats where a quarter of the population thought they had a food allergy, but in reality it's more like 6-7% in children and 2-3% in adults, iirc.
I am actually curious about this, as I was also diagnosed with an allergy to almonds, but I had some almonds by accident earlier in the year, mixed up in some food I ate, and I had no reaction at all.


Last edited by tbcwpg: 10-26-2011 at 02:40 PM.
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10-26-2011, 03:48 PM
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Out of curiosity, how were you diagnosed with the almond allergy? Like I said earlier, the only definitive way to be diagnosed is through challenge testing, but many parents rely on the easier-and-cheaper blood/scratch tests or even just anecdotal evidence from when a kid is little.

And like Fugu correctly said, way too many mistake food intolerance with food allergy (it's extremely rare to be allergic to milk or gluten, for instance, while intolerance to those is much more common).

Additionally, some people do "grow out" of childhood food sensitivities much like some people "grow out" of asthma. Here's the AAFA's page on food allergies: http://www.aafa.org/display.cfm?id=9&sub=20&cont=286

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10-26-2011, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fehr Time View Post
There are and will be even more snarky comments in this thread, but this is actually not the worst of ideas I guess. Some people these days are incredibly sensitive to these allergens and the slightest contact can lead to a life threatening anaphylactic reaction. It does no doubt prevent many sports fans from attending events. Not sure how many of them are Coyotes fans though.
The snarkey comments will come from the ignorant.

That aside.... it's not just food allergies. AZ is one of the biggest states in the US with allergy issues of all types. My sinuses go from arid desert to Niagra Falls in less than 30 seconds without any warning and it can happen anywhere at any time. I never had this problem to this severe a degree until I moved here from CA. I can be a real annoyance at time but it's something I can live with

But food allergies are much more serious and it does not hurt for a franchise to look into ways of meeting the needs of those who do suffer from them.

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10-26-2011, 04:43 PM
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This may be a good idea, however I don't see it succeeding in attracting more permanent fans to Coyotes games on a consistant basis, if that is the main purpose here.


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10-26-2011, 05:17 PM
  #14
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This may be a good idea, however I don't see it succeeding in attracting more permanent fans to Coyotes games on a consistant basis, if that is the main purpose here.
I agree. However, it is a very inexpensive way to get (positive) publicity.

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Old
10-26-2011, 06:09 PM
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tbcwpg
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Originally Posted by Kritter471 View Post
Out of curiosity, how were you diagnosed with the almond allergy? Like I said earlier, the only definitive way to be diagnosed is through challenge testing, but many parents rely on the easier-and-cheaper blood/scratch tests or even just anecdotal evidence from when a kid is little.

And like Fugu correctly said, way too many mistake food intolerance with food allergy (it's extremely rare to be allergic to milk or gluten, for instance, while intolerance to those is much more common).

Additionally, some people do "grow out" of childhood food sensitivities much like some people "grow out" of asthma. Here's the AAFA's page on food allergies: http://www.aafa.org/display.cfm?id=9&sub=20&cont=286
I have seen an allergist twice, once when I was 15 and then at 23 and the almond allergy was the same "severity" both times. I'm not sure the name of the test, but it was on the inside of my forearm with very small testers, I suppose it's closer to a scratch test.

They tested a bunch of different things and noted how much of a reaction it gave. The peanut gave me a huge bump and the almond gave me a smaller, but still fairly significant bump. I'm wondering now whether it was due to proximity to the peanut test. The second time I went I had also added hazelnuts to the list, although I haven't had any of those yet so I don't know if it would give me the same lack of reaction that the almonds did. I have reacted as a kid to peanuts a few times so I'm fairly sure that allergy is still there.

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