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Old
11-05-2011, 10:39 PM
  #1
cheap77
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Stopping

I recently started skating and I'm looking to play in a adult hockey league for noobs. I have been practicing skating the past couple weeks, but I have had a lot of trouble when it comes to stopping. I seem to try the sudden stop and either fall on my face or trip up and keep sliding into the boards. Does anyone have any tips or tricks for stopping? Any help would great.

Thanks

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11-05-2011, 10:46 PM
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mhkehoe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheap1nt View Post
I recently started skating and I'm looking to play in a adult hockey league for noobs. I have been practicing skating the past couple weeks, but I have had a lot of trouble when it comes to stopping. I seem to try the sudden stop and either fall on my face or trip up and keep sliding into the boards. Does anyone have any tips or tricks for stopping? Any help would great.

Thanks
Do you know what hollow you have on your skates?

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Old
11-05-2011, 10:56 PM
  #3
cheap77
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I don't have a clue, sorry.

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11-05-2011, 11:07 PM
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mhkehoe
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Originally Posted by cheap1nt View Post
I don't have a clue, sorry.
I've heard a lot of new skaters have success using 3/4" or 1" hollow to learn the proper form, and once they are used to the form, they move to a more aggressive cut.

This will only help if you feel like you are digging into the ice too much and this causes you to fall. It will also change how skating feels on the rest of the ice.

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11-05-2011, 11:11 PM
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CuteHockeyBunny
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I wouldn't worry about hollow just yet.

Watch this, it's how I learned.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIdr6KOX8uQ

Master the snowplow, then you can start trying the hockey stop.

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11-05-2011, 11:26 PM
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mhkehoe
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Originally Posted by CuteHockeyBunny View Post
I wouldn't worry about hollow just yet.

Watch this, it's how I learned.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIdr6KOX8uQ

Master the snowplow, then you can start trying the hockey stop.
Good video. I mention the hollow because I did know one guy who was new and bought used skates to start. Hollow was around 3/8", and he had a lot of trouble learning until he got them resharpened.

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11-05-2011, 11:29 PM
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cheap77
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Originally Posted by CuteHockeyBunny View Post
I wouldn't worry about hollow just yet.

Watch this, it's how I learned.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIdr6KOX8uQ

Master the snowplow, then you can start trying the hockey stop.
Thank you, that was a really helpful video.

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Old
11-06-2011, 12:13 AM
  #8
nullterm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhkehoe View Post
I've heard a lot of new skaters have success using 3/4" or 1" hollow to learn the proper form, and once they are used to the form, they move to a more aggressive cut.

This will only help if you feel like you are digging into the ice too much and this causes you to fall. It will also change how skating feels on the rest of the ice.
This. I went from a 3/8 to a 3/4 and it made a BIG difference in learning to stop. It gives you more forgiveness on stopping until you get more adept at using your edges.

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11-06-2011, 01:04 PM
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berzark
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The trick is skating at a slow pace and take the foot your most comfortable with and take the pressure off of it completely while still slightly touching the ice. Turn is slowly and you will see it's going to start scrapping the ice and not biting in it. You'll get the feel of it eventually and that is how you stop.

Just keep in mind that you'll basically be balancing your weight on 1 foot and turn the foot you have no pressure on slowly. If you fall it's because it's either biting into the ice or you're not balanced enough. If it's the case ; bend your knees and lower your center of gravity.

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11-06-2011, 03:26 PM
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Originally Posted by berzark View Post
The trick is skating at a slow pace and take the foot your most comfortable with and take the pressure off of it completely while still slightly touching the ice. Turn is slowly and you will see it's going to start scrapping the ice and not biting in it. You'll get the feel of it eventually and that is how you stop.

Just keep in mind that you'll basically be balancing your weight on 1 foot and turn the foot you have no pressure on slowly. If you fall it's because it's either biting into the ice or you're not balanced enough. If it's the case ; bend your knees and lower your center of gravity.
Thanks for the advice.

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11-06-2011, 05:55 PM
  #11
RandV
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Yeah I grew up being the kid at the rink who never could figure out how to stop, so when I decided to start playing ice hockey I needed to learn real quick.

I was at a near empty public skate and payed close attention to how another guy was doing it, and was a little lucky in that he wasn't doing it quite right but I was able to replicate and learn it. In a normal hockey stop your feet are parallel, side be side, which i always trade to replicate but never could. I saw this guy stopping with his foot in more of a line, toe to heel, and in replicating that it was far easier to pick up. Almost like you're going into a turn, but one foot in front of the other and dig both of them into the ice.

Once I was able to actually stop it wasn't long before I could do it the proper way, and then I got my weak stopping side down by intentionally using it whenever I needed to come to a casual stop.

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11-07-2011, 10:43 AM
  #12
Stickmata
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Snowplow, then one skate, then both skates. Do it both ways from the start. The biggest mistake I see most newbs making (aside from not bending their knees) is they try to really dig in and stop hard. I tell all the kids I coach, start by sliding gently to a stop so you learn to feel your edges. Then when you really have good feel, you can start increasing pressure and stopping quicker. The kids that try to stop on a dime from the beginning seem to be the worst at stopping.

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11-07-2011, 10:46 AM
  #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RandV View Post
Yeah I grew up being the kid at the rink who never could figure out how to stop, so when I decided to start playing ice hockey I needed to learn real quick.

I was at a near empty public skate and payed close attention to how another guy was doing it, and was a little lucky in that he wasn't doing it quite right but I was able to replicate and learn it. In a normal hockey stop your feet are parallel, side be side, which i always trade to replicate but never could. I saw this guy stopping with his foot in more of a line, toe to heel, and in replicating that it was far easier to pick up. Almost like you're going into a turn, but one foot in front of the other and dig both of them into the ice.
No they're not. In a proper hockey stop, your feet are not side by side in parallel. They are staggered, as you describe at the end.

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11-07-2011, 11:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Stickmata View Post
No they're not. In a proper hockey stop, your feet are not side by side in parallel. They are staggered, as you describe at the end.
Many ways to do speed control on skates

typical hockey stops, the feet for sure can be parallel, or staggared

Staggard appropately (depending on the direction you're facing allows your feet to quickly start moving to change directions via laterial/backwards crossovers)
Or to turn quickly doing either heel to heel or tight turns
I also find that you have more biting edge to allow for a quicker stop

My feet are never perfectly parallel when I stop, nor should it be, however I do keep them closer to parallel than staggard WHEN I do a progressive "stop" where I don't come to a complete stop, again to be facing the play, making a pass and to keep momentium to allow me to get my feet moving fast.

"snow plowing" isn't necessarially the idea, but when people go into a "wide" stance when entering the zone with speed, you can dig with your inside edges to slow the pace and turn, as well as put your heel in to do a controlled yet quick turn in a wide stance

When stopping backwards, its easy to do the "reverse" snowplow to both control speed and to allow for a quick change of direction as you can lean forward into your power start

you can also use a single foot to do speed control meanwhile your glide foot pointing in the direction you're going...
This is espcially true on tight turns where your lead foot's inside edge is what controls the speed of which you're entering.

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11-07-2011, 11:47 AM
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^ do what that video says over and over and over again at any ice time you can get. That's about the only way to get it. You need to learn the feeling of using that edge to scrape the ice and then get the confidence to try it. You will fall down but eventually get your balance and then do it at higher speeds.

It took me several weeks of practice to learn to stop on both sides but you'll pick it up quickly, trust me! Then it's off to crossovers and tight turns and you'll skate circles around the beginners.

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11-07-2011, 12:07 PM
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^ do what that video says over and over and over again at any ice time you can get. That's about the only way to get it. You need to learn the feeling of using that edge to scrape the ice and then get the confidence to try it. You will fall down but eventually get your balance and then do it at higher speeds.

It took me several weeks of practice to learn to stop on both sides but you'll pick it up quickly, trust me! Then it's off to crossovers and tight turns and you'll skate circles around the beginners.
helmet, pants, elbow pads and shin pads makes all the confidance in the world...

I remember hurting so bad when I was learning to skate when I was a kid, until I got elbow and knee pads...

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11-07-2011, 12:08 PM
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CGNY87
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Do some edge work drills. Stopping was weird for me. I had all kinds of trouble stopping but after working on my edges one day it just seems to work. Then I just had to work on stopping at full speed.

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11-07-2011, 01:23 PM
  #18
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Originally Posted by cheap1nt View Post
I recently started skating and I'm looking to play in a adult hockey league for noobs. I have been practicing skating the past couple weeks, but I have had a lot of trouble when it comes to stopping. I seem to try the sudden stop and either fall on my face or trip up and keep sliding into the boards. Does anyone have any tips or tricks for stopping? Any help would great.

Thanks
My best suggestion would be to take a few skating lessons at your local rink. I don't know about you, but I can't learn something like skating by reading advice on a forum. I have to see someone do it in real life. An instructor can see what you may be doing wrong, and show you the correct way.

Plus, lots and lots of practice!!

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11-07-2011, 04:43 PM
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cheap77
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Thanks everyone! I have been reading your comments and watching videos and I think I have a better idea of what to do. I'm really going to work on it the next chance I get.

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11-07-2011, 08:24 PM
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SkyKushryd
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Heres a question.

I can stop on my right foot very easily, but can't stop on my left at all.

I know about the "Snowplow" method, but I'm having problems getting my left foot to "slide" like my right does, even when "snowplowing".

Any tips?

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11-07-2011, 08:35 PM
  #21
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Originally Posted by SkyKushryd View Post
Heres a question.

I can stop on my right foot very easily, but can't stop on my left at all.

I know about the "Snowplow" method, but I'm having problems getting my left foot to "slide" like my right does, even when "snowplowing".

Any tips?
don't just watch videos, but watch yourself.

watch the right foot that you are comfortable stopping with.. watch it repeatedly and then try your best to replicate it with the left. most everyone has a dominant foot and what you have to do to stop both ways is commit to it. if you're not falling, you're not learning.

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11-07-2011, 08:47 PM
  #22
CuteHockeyBunny
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Originally Posted by SkyKushryd View Post
Heres a question.

I can stop on my right foot very easily, but can't stop on my left at all.

I know about the "Snowplow" method, but I'm having problems getting my left foot to "slide" like my right does, even when "snowplowing".

Any tips?
Takes a while. Keep practising with your left though. I foolishly relied on stopping on the right side for TWO years of hockey, only on my third did I make an effort to learn to break on the left and it took me only 3-4 weeks to get it down pat.

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11-07-2011, 10:18 PM
  #23
Jarick
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I never did the snowplow. Just watch that video above and work on ice scraping with your weak side. It will take a while but then it's second nature.

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11-07-2011, 10:28 PM
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Wilch
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I can do a full hockey stop with my right side... Now I'm starting on my left side it feels like I'm learning it from scratch again

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11-07-2011, 11:02 PM
  #25
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One of the things i see in public skates are guys who can not even do one foot stops trying to do a full hockey stop and don't even stop fully before they move out of the stop and start skating again. It's terribly frustrating to watch.

Take it one step at a time and learn the proper ways as seen in the videos. For me, my left side is still not that strong so when i get to go to public skates, i do lines stopping on my weak side. As with just about everything in hockey, practice makes perfect.

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