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Old
10-19-2011, 05:33 PM
  #26
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Armand Mondou, LW



Quote:
Originally Posted by Our History, Montreal Canadiens
Defensive specialist Armand Mondou spent 12 years with the Canadiens and while he never scored more than seven goals in a single season, his solid checking and dedicated team play made him among the most valuable Habs of his era.

The Yamaska, QC native joined the Canadiens during the 1928-29 season after spending the two previous campaigns skating with the Providence Reds. Mondou launched his NHL career by notching the first three of his 47 career goals in his rookie season.

Mondou, who wore 13 different numbers during his NHL tenure, made good use of his 5-foot-10, 175-pound frame as a gritty left winger. Almost always staying within the rules of the game, he was rarely penalized as a result of his efforts, accumulating only 118 minutes in the box over 386 regular season games.

A skilled playmaker and key component to the 1930 and 1931 Stanley Cups, Mondou, who has been cited as being among the originators of the slap shot, secured a place for himself in hockey history on November 10, 1934.

Awarded the NHL’s first penalty shot, Mondou skated in alone on former teammate George Hainsworth, unsuccessful in his attempt to foil the Toronto goaltender.

The popular veteran, who capped his career in a Montreal uniform during the 1939-40 season, began his last year with an appearance in a benefit game between the Habs and the best players from the other six NHL teams with proceeds going to the family of Babe Siebert, hired to run the Montreal bench for the upcoming season but who drowned over the summer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
Left-winger Armand Mondou was a fine checker and playmaker on the Montreal Canadiens in the 1920s and '30s. His speed and unselfish play was an integral part of two Stanley Cup championships.

Born in Yamaska, Quebec, Mondou spent a year with the senior St. Francis Xavier team in Montreal before spending three years in the Can-Am League with the Providence Reds. Beginning in 1928-29, the tricky forward spent parts of twelve seasons with the Habs. In 1930 and 1931 his tight checking helped the Canadiens win consecutive Stanley Cups. The first of these was a huge upset over a talent-laden Boston club in which Mondou's defence was a key factor.

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10-19-2011, 05:37 PM
  #27
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Paul Cavallini, D



1989-1990 Plus/Minus Champion (+38)
Played in 1990 NHL All-Star Game

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
The younger brother of Gino, Paul's NHL career was almost a match, though rather than a second career in the minors and Europe, Paul retired after he knew his NHL career was over.
Drafted a lowly 205th overall by Washington in 1984, Cavallini had just one year of college before turning pro and joining the Caps farm team in Binghampton toward the end of the 1985-86 season. The next year he saw some action with the Caps, and the year after he made the team full-time. However, after just 24 games, Washington game up on him, sending him to St. Louis for a 2nd-round draft choice.

Of course, the Blues wanted Paul so he could play with brother Gino, and he proved a very reliable defenceman in his own end with fine offensive abilities as well. Early in 1992-93 the Caps re-acquired him only to send him to Dallas over the summer in 1993.

Cavallini played two years with the Stars, but after just eight games in 1995-96 retired from the NHL after 564 games.

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10-19-2011, 05:49 PM
  #28
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Ed Kea, D



Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
This defensive defenseman was born in Weesp, Holland, the only Dutch born player in the NHL to this date. He was the youngest of 14 children and moved to Canada with his parents when he was 4-years old. Ed is Jeff Beukeboom's uncle who is Joe Nieuwendyk's cousin.

Ed was a big (6'3" and 200 Ibs) defenseman who wasn't very fast but who played very well positionally. He played his junior hockey for the Collingwood Kings and was discovered by Fred Creighton who saw him play in the EHL. He then recommended the Atlanta Flames to take a look at Ed. Ed was signed as a free agent by Atlanta on October 6, 1972.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
The defenseman made his NHL during the 1973-74 season when he played three games for the Flames, but he was a regular the following season. Kea spent the next five seasons playing his solid, steady game on the Flames blue line before being dealt just prior to the 1979-80 season.

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10-26-2011, 01:38 PM
  #29
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Brent Burns, D



* 6'5, 219 lbs.
* 158 points over just 405 NHL games
* Best Defenseman at 2008 World Championships
* Most Minutes Played for Team Canada at 2010 World Championships

Quote:
Upon turning professional with the Wild in 2003, Burns was converted to defense by defensively minded coach Jacques Lemaire. Burns played in 36 games with Minnesota in the 2003-04 season, showing flashes of natural ability in rushing from the blueline. After spending the 2004 NHL Lockout in the AHL with the Houston Aeros, Burns adapted as defenseman and earned a regular spot on the Wild team in the 2005-06 season, contributing 16 points in 72 games.

In the 2006-07 season, Burns eclipsed his previous seasons points total with 25 and became a significant force for the Wild in the later months of the season scoring back-to-back overtime winners in March and two fights during the playoffs.

On October 25, 2007, during the 2007-08 season, Burns signed a four-year contract extension with the Wild. Burns emerged as the Wild's best defenseman, establishing a career-high 15 goals and 43 points.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
In Minnesota, Burns began to establish himself as one of the top defenders in the NHL, recording 15 goals and 43 points in 2007-08. His strong play earned him a spot on Canada's silver medal-winning team at the 2008 World Championships in Quebec City.

In 2010-11, Burns would again set career bests in goals (17), assists (29) and points (46), but his best season in Minnesota would also turn out to be his last. On June 24, 2011, Burns was traded to the San Jose Sharks along with a second round draft pick in exchange for Devin Setogouchi, Charlie Coyle and a first round pick.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey News
ASSETS: Is both incredibly mobile and athletic in general. Also boasts tremendous size, to go with his skating ability. Was mature enough to handle a conversion from right wing to defense quickly and in almost flawless fashion.

FLAWS: Is still a little raw for the blue-line position and makes mental errors from time to time. Needs to use his physical gifts more to his advantage, especially in terms of adding more toughness to his game.

CAREER POTENTIAL: Inconsistent all-around defenseman with great size and mobility.

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10-26-2011, 01:42 PM
  #30
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Dennis Ververgaert, RW



* NHL All-Star Game (1976, 1978)
* 392 points in 583 NHL games

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
During his first five campaigns with the Canucks, Ververgaert was given an offensive role and, for the most part, was able to deliver?just so long as he remained unfettered by defensive responsibilities. He usually played with Andre Boudrias with the offensive credo: "Get the puck to Verve and let others attend to defense."

Problems arose, however, with the arrival of new coach Harry Neale in 1978. He insisted that Ververgaert carry his defensive weight just like everyone else. But the point-hungry winger was slow to adapt to his new role. As a result, he was shipped to Philadelphia where, ironically, he finally evolved into a defensive forward. He was particularly noteworthy for his strong skating and ability to channel his opponents to disadvantageous areas of the ice.
Quote:
He is best known for his time with the Vancouver Canucks, where he was one of the club's top players in their first decade of existence.

Blessed with size and skill together with a booming shot, Ververgaert was thought to have the potential to be the first true star player in the history of the young franchise.

In his first NHL season, Ververgaert didn't disappoint, stepping straight into the Canucks' roster and recording a team-leading 26 goals along with 31 assists for 57 points. He led all rookies in goals and was second in points to Tom Lysiak, and finished 4th in Calder Trophy voting as the league's top rookie. His 26 goals remained the Canuck rookie record until broken by Trevor Linden in 1988–89.

In 1974–75 Ververgaert was even better, recording 51 points in 57 games despite missing substantial time due to a serious shoulder injury. His production was a key factor in the team's improvement, as they won their division and made the playoffs for the first time. He would have his finest season in 1975–76, leading the Canucks with 37 goals and 71 points. He was also selected to play in his first NHL All-Star Game and proceeded to score two goals in 10 seconds to set an All-Star record, since broken by Owen Nolan.

After the success of his first three seasons, Ververgaert appeared to be on the verge of stardom. However, his career would go sideways after 1976 as his production dropped off and he came under increased criticism for his poor defensive play. His greatest success had been with center André Boudrias, and after Boudrias left for the WHA, he was never able to find the same sort of chemistry with later linemates. In 1976–77, he slumped to 27 goals and just 45 points, while recording a dismal plus/minus rating of -35. He rebounded slightly in 1977–78 to tally 21 goals and a career-high 33 assists for 54 points, and was selected to play in his second All-Star game.

In 1978–79, he started the season slowly with just 9 goals in his first 35 games, and was facing stiff competition for icetime from star rookie Stan Smyl. Mid-way through the season, he was dealt to the Philadelphia Flyers

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Old
10-26-2011, 01:51 PM
  #31
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David Legwand, C



* 6'2", 205 lbs.
* 456 points in 776 games played.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hockey News
ASSETS: Has exceptional speed, which rivals that of the majority of NHL pivots. Works hard in all three zones. Can win important face-offs.

FLAWS: Has a tendency to get hurt. Doesn't use his 6-2 frame enough to his advantage. Should produce more points but lacks consistency in that department.

CAREER POTENTIAL: Two-way center with speed and savvy.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
An offensively gifted player, Legwand finished with 85 goals and 100 assists for 185 points in his two seasons with Plymouth. During his rookie season in 1999-00, the talented pivot recorded 28 points while working on his consistency and defensive play. Legwand upped his totals to 41 points the following year, before an injury plagued 2001-02 season, limited him to 63 games.

One of the young stars of the NHL, Legwand broke out offensively in 2002-03, establishing career highs in goals, 17, assists, 31 and points, 48 before a broken collaborne ended his season.

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10-26-2011, 01:56 PM
  #32
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Curtis Brown, W/D



* 6'0", 190 lbs
* 300 points in 736 games played.

Brown had some high finishes in Selke voting throughout his career.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
After splitting the 1996-97 season between the minors and the NHL, Brown played a full year with the Sabres in 1998. Brown's strong play at both ends of the ice have made a solid player useful in a variety of situations. Brown was one of the Sabres' best performers when the club reached the Stanley Cup final for the first time in 24 years in 1999. In 99-2000 he recorded his first 20-goal season then went on to play a more defensive role with the Sabres over the course of the next four seasons.

Brown's strong play at both ends of the ice and down the middle garnered much attention as the Sabres entered the 2003-04 season and once the trading deadline had arrived the Sabres dealt Brown to the San Jose Sharks for young defenceman Jeff Jillson who had been acquired via the Boston Bruins for prospect Brad Boyes.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/hoc...nek_sabres_ap/

Quote:
Originally Posted by SI.com
Regier said he's close to re-signing gritty two-way forward Curtis Brown

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10-26-2011, 02:00 PM
  #33
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Yuri Shatalov, D



* 5'8", 168 lbs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Summit Series
Yuri Shatalov was a defensive defenseman who is one of the few Soviet players during the "robotic" era who could have his style of play described as "full of heart." He was often used against the other team's top players because of his defensive play and his first-step quickness.

Shatalov was captain of the Soviet club team Krylja Sovetov, but never became a regular on the national team.

Perhaps he never became a regular on the national team following an unusual event in Soviet hockey that occurred in 1973. Shatalov attacked an opponent on the ice. It was a routine thing in Canadian hockey, but very much frowned upon in Soviet hockey. In the same game Vyacheslav Anisin struck the referee with his stick.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chidlovski
Shatalov was a steady defenseman that went from a hockey apprenticeship school with CSKA to become an essential player with Krylya Sovetov Moscow. In terms of his individual skills, Shatalov was known as a fearless shot-blocker and a fast skater with distinct talent to play impressive physical hockey. He was often assigned by the coaches to neutralize the best players of the opposing team. Shatalov was a captain of Krylya Sovetov led by coach Boris Kulagin to the national championship in 1974. He always appeared on ice in the key moments of the game.

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10-27-2011, 12:33 AM
  #34
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Alexander Semak, C
  • 24 points in 21 WJC games
  • 15 points in 30 World Championship games
  • 5 goals, 1 assist in 12 Canada Cup games (1987 and 1991)
  • Scored the OT winner in Game 1 of the 1987 Canada Cup final
  • 10 points in 12 games for Dynamo Moscow in 2 Super Series against NHL teams
  • 3rd in Soviet Player of the Year voting in 1990-91 (behind Valeri Kamensky and Pavel Bure)
  • Scored 79 points in his only full NHL season before succumbing to injury

Quote:
Originally Posted by LOH
Alexander Semak began his hockey career in 1982 with the Ufa Salavat of the USSR. He played there for four seasons while also representing his country in the World Junior Championships winning gold in 1984, a bronze the next year, and gold once again in '86.

Semak spent the next five and a half seasons playing for the Moscow Dynamo and once again represented his country in countless tournaments such as Rendezvous '87, World and European Championships, the Canada Cup, and NHL-Soviet Super Series, collecting several medals and championships along the way.

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Old
10-27-2011, 01:25 AM
  #35
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D Harold Snepsts



x2 NHL All-star Game
6th in PIM '85
1000+ gp, 2000+ PIM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
While he played in short stops with the Minnesota North Stars, Detroit Red Wings and St. Louis Blues, the mustachioed and helmetless Harold Snepsts will forever be remembered as the robust though anything but graceful blue liner with the Vancouver Canucks for a combined 12 NHL seasons.

Harold was a hugely popular player on the west coast, perhaps the most popular ever. He was a cult hero in the old Pacific Coliseum, where fans would boisterously chant "Haaar-Old! .... Haaar-Old!....Haaar-Old!" over and over. Even in the later years of his career when he would revisit Vancouver as a member of another club, the fans would cheer for their hero.


Harold had no real finesse skill to speak of. He was a down right terrible skater. He seemingly ran on the ice instead of gliding in strong strides. He had little speed and even less mobility. This made him prone to being beaten one-on-one by a fleet footed enemy. Harold also was an adventure with the puck. Over time he learned to almost avoid handling the puck. If he did have to play it he'd most likely just fire it out of the zone. However because he often played with his back to the play, he was often intercepted.

What Snepsts could do though was extremely valuable. He intimidated the opposition. You would think twice before traveling to the slot in front of the Canucks net, as Harold would punish you with enjoyment. He loved to hit and did so with great aggression and authority. In his younger years he was a willing and good fighter, though. Essentially he was on the ice to add size and aggression, and to keep the other team honest.

One of the reasons why Harold lasted over 1000 games in the National Hockey League was because he was as popular with his teammates as he was with the fans. He had a legendary sense of humour and was a great leader. The great character he showed every day of his career was an immeasurable contribution that far outweighed any amount of goals or bodychecks he collected.
http://canuckslegends.blogspot.com/2...d-snepsts.html

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10-27-2011, 01:26 AM
  #36
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Quad City selects D Dmitri Mironov



1998 ASG
x1 Top 10 Defenseman Points (10th '98)
260PTS in 556GP

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
For the next three seasons, Mironov was a full-time Leaf, unleashing his hard shot on opposing netminders. But while waiting for the 1995-96 season to begin, Mironov was traded with a draft choice to the Penguins for Larry Murphy. After a year and a bit with the Penguins, Pittsburgh traded "Tree" to the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim.

Mironov played in California until March 1998 when he was sent to Detroit as defense insurance for the Red WingsÕ march to the Stanley Cup. It worked, and Mironov can now proudly boast of a Stanley Cup championship ring from the 1997-98 season. By 1998-99, he had become a Washington Capital. Dmitri has a brother who also made the NHL--Boris Mironov.

There were also invitations to join the national team. Mironov made his debut at the Izvestia Cup tournament in 1991. That was followed by the World Championships in Finland, where he made the second All-Star team. It was at that championship that Mironov was spotted by scouts and put on the draft list of the Toronto Maple Leafs.

In 1992 the Russians sent a very young team to the Olympics in France. At 25, Mironov was the most experienced defenseman. But they won the ice hockey tournament, beating the Eric Lindros-led Team Canada in the final. Two-thirds of the players from that Russian team are now in the NHL.

He then played seven games for the Leafs at season's end, scored one goal and got a broken nose. His real debut came the next year. He had to get used to the tight game schedule, a completely new style of playing and constant changes of partners. Toronto head coach Pat Burns even tried Mironov out as a forward. It was the best season for the Maple Leafs in the 1990s.

After two poor conference finals in a row, the Leafs began a string of trades. Mironov was sent to the Pittsburgh Penguins in exchange for defenseman Larry Murphy. In Pittsburgh, Mironov's game didn't click, so Dmitri was careful in his next trade. The Anaheim Mighty Ducks were a very young team, only three years into their franchise. Before the season started, bookmakers were giving them 150-1 odds. But Mironov came to the team with one of the best young coaches in the NHL, Ron Wilson, and upcoming stars Paul Kariya and Teemu Selanne. It could be said that the years with Anaheim were the best in Mironov's NHL career. And the power-play unit led by Mironov, Kariya and Selanne was considered one of the best in the league. Dmitri also took part in the silver medal win by Russia at the Olympic tournament in Nagano. Then came his most surprising trade of all.

He came to the Detroit Red Wings near the end of the regular season, played only three months for the team and won the Stanley Cup. And he was playing again with his former teammates Viacheslav Fetisov, Igor Larionov and Sergei Fedorov. The parade of champions was held in Detroit, but Mironov's contract expired and for some reason the new Red Wings management was in no hurry to renew it. He began to search for a new club and settled on the Washington Capitals, whose coach, Ron Wilson, wanted Mironov back in his lineup.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seventieslord Previous Profile
A massive Russian defenseman, Mironov quietly put together a long and solid career. He’s 6’4, 224, and threw the occasional big hit, though not as many as his brother did. It’s debatable which of the two was a better overall player. Dmitri started his career in Russia. In the two years before his move to North America, he was 1st and 2nd in scoring among defenseman. He instantly paid dividends for the Leafs, playing excellent hockey in their two semifinal runs. He was 4th in the 1994 playoffs in scoring by defensemen, and 3rd in the 1997 playoffs with Anaheim. He won a cup in 1998 with Detroit. He was always there to represent his country, playing in 5 tournaments and 36 games, scoring 15 points. Mironov played in the 1998 All-Star game and was top-15 in scoring by defensemen once, missing out another time by three points. He won an Olympic silver in 1998. He had 260 points in 556 NHL games.

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10-27-2011, 01:27 AM
  #37
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Quad City selects D Boris Mironov



307PTS in 716GP
14th D points '98
10th D points '99

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
In 1993-94 Mironov played 65 games, scoring seven goals and 29 points. He was then traded to the Edmonton Oilers with Mats Lindgren, a first-round draft pick who turned out to be Jason Bonsignore. Mironov played in Edmonton for more than five years establishing a career high in goals (16), assists (30) and points (46) before being traded to the Chicago Blackhawks in the latter stages of the 1998-99 season.

Upon his arrival in the Windy City, Mironov continued his strong play on the Blackhawk blueline, despite missing action due to injury. After a little over three season with Chicago, Mironov was traded to the New York Rangers in January, 2003.

Aside from his appearances at the World Juniors, Mironov went on to represent his homeland at the World Championships (1996 and 2000) and the Winter Olympics (1998 and 2002).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seventieslord Previous Profile
Seven years younger than Dmitri, he was no smaller – 6’3 and 223 lbs. Mironov was known for throwing the occasional huge open ice hit. Dave Gagner was the recipient of one of them, and he was never the same afterwards. For a short time, Mironov was the total package and was considered a top-15 defenseman in the NHL. He didn’t hold that status for long, but was a good player for a long time. Icetime numbers show that he was his team’s #1-3 defenseman from 2000 until he left the NHL in 2004. He has been a top-15 scorer among defensemen twice, and scored 307 points in 716 games. “Players” describes him as a “tremendous defenseman, strong on the man, skilled with the puck, and aggressive at both ends of the ice.” He also earned a silver medal in the 1998 Olympics and played in Salt Lake City as well.

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10-27-2011, 01:27 AM
  #38
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C/W Alex "Killer" Kaleta



213 points in 387GP. Top 10 in points once, also with a top 5 finish in assists that year. Quick skater who excels in playmaking but given nickname of Killer in jest, due to his inability to hit anything (see Fischler quote). Asked to play a defensive role during his time in New York and became a fan favorite. Very successful offensive seasons in PCHL and WHL after retiring from NHL.

Still a solid offensive contributor despite being soft and playing a defensive role at the end of his career. If we look at some other players taken in this draft from his era:

.55PPG Adam Brown (391 GP)
.55PPG Alex Kaleta (387 GP)
.54PPG Bep Guidolin (519 GP)
.53PPG Pete Horeck (426 GP)
.52PPG Ken Smith (331 GP)

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
Left-winger Alex Kaleta was a solid offensive producer for seven NHL seasons split between the Chicago Black Hawks and New York Rangers during the 1940s. His career would have been more substantial had he not spent three years in the military reserve during World War II.

The native of Cranmore, Alberta spent Chicago three years in the provincial senior league with the Calgary Stampeders, Regina Aces, and Lethbridge Maple Leafs. "Sea Biscuit" registered 28 points as a rookie with in 1941-42 then spent three seasons playing with the Calgary Currie Army during the War.

When Kaleta returned to the Hawks in 1945-46, his skills were as sharp as ever. Playing chiefly on a line with Clint Smith and Red Hamill, he averaged just under a point per game and helped the team qualify for the post-season. Kaleta recorded a personal high of 24 goals in 1946-47 then spent one more year in the Windy City before a trade brought him to the New York Rangers. This transaction involved future Blueshirts' coach and GM Emile Francis and the well-known Sugar Jim Henry.

Kaleta's role was more defensive in New York as the team had sufficient offensive punch from Edgar Laprade, Buddy O'Connor, and Don Raleigh. Kaleta did not return to the NHL after the 1950-51 season but did play four years with the Saskatoon Quakers of the PCHL/WHL before retiring in 1955. In 1952-53 he led the WHL with 57 assists and finished with 248 points his last four years in the minors.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Canmore, Alberta's Alex Kaleta, the son of a coal miner, was described as a magnificent playmaking left winger. I like to include player's strengths and weaknesses and tendencies, but memories of Kaleta have been tough to find.

Except for this one little tidbit that certainly made me laugh. Although his penalty minute totals suggest otherwise, with a nickname like Killer you'd expect him to be a pretty tough customer. He may very well have been, but maybe not as tough as his wife as Wild Bill Eznicki found out one night.

"During the 1948-49 season, the Rangers' Alex Kaleta picked a fight with bigger, meaner Bill Ezinicki of Toronto. Though Ezinicki won the fight, he not only wound up in the penalty box with a five-minute major, but also, as Emile Francis recalls, "Kaleta's wife comes out of the stands, down to Ezinicki in the penalty box, and hits him with her purse."

Kaleta had another nickname - Seabiscuit. It is said Kaleta earned the moniker for his speed and tenacity on the ice.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa Citizen-10/12/1948
Kaleta, a five-foot, 11.5-inch crafy stickhandler....The Rangers count on the 28-year-old Kaleta, who can play right or left wing...
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...x+kaleta&hl=en

Quote:
Kaleta, extremely popular with Garden fans, is a 10-year man who can play any of the front line positions.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...a+killer&hl=en

Quote:
Originally Posted by Who's Who in Hockey by Stan and Shirley Fischler
A flamboyant skater who could have inspired the line "much ado about nothing," Alex Kaleta launched his big-league career with the Blackhawks in 1941-42...Blueshirts public relations honcho Stan Saplin immediately dubbed Kaleta "Killer"-mainly because he was exactly the opposite; in fact, Alex would harm neither beasts, man, nor enemy hockey players. But New York fans immediately took him to their collective hearts, despite his peaceful nature, joyfully shouting KILLER! KILLER! each time Kaleta took to the ice. Alex's last NHL season was 50-51, with the Rangers.
LW Darcy Rota



495 points in 794 games
256 goals, 20 goals nine times, 40 goals once
x2 Top 5 shooting%, led league in 82-83
x1 NHL ASG (84)

Quote:
As an all-star with the Edmonton Oil Kings of the WCJHL from 1970 to 1973, Darcy Rota was a scoring ace with a reputation for putting the pursuit of goals ahead of playing defense.

Nonetheless, he was a coveted draft pick scooped up by the Chicago Blackhawks in 1973. Under coach Billy Reay's direction, Rota was pressured to stick to his wing, moving up and down in the older, traditional style of the NHL. With such specific direction, he was able to quickly develop into a more balanced player.

In the early years with the Hawks, he was tossed onto a line with Stan Mikita and Cliff Koroll. In such company, Rota became a steady scorer from day one. Several seasons later, he jumped to a line with Dale Tallon and Chico Maki where he continued to be a consistent performer.

In 1979, however, the Hawks couldn't resist the opportunity to get their hands on Tom Lysiak of the Atlanta Flames. The two clubs cooked up a blockbuster trade that swept Rota down to Georgia along with Phil Russell and Ivan Boldriev.

Rota's career with the Flames lasted little more than a season before he was traded to the Vancouver Cancuks in 1980. On the West Coast, he turned his offensive game up to his personal-best level, netting 81 points during the 1982-83 campaign. The following season, however, he suffered a serious spinal injury that raised talk of wheelchairs and retirement. But after neck surgery, the wheelchair was ruled out while retirement was ushered in.

Quote:
At 5-foot-11 and 180-pounds, Rota didn’t have imposing as an attribute on his hockey resume, but his toughness and grit, paired with deceptively good offensive skills, made him the type of character player that championship teams are made of.

Rota proved his worth time and time again with the Canucks, especially in the run to Vancouver’s first Stanley Cup appearance in 19892 as he chipped in with six goals and three assists in 17 games. The following season, Rota, thanks to some help from linemates Stan Smyl and Thomas Gradin, exploded for 81 points in 73 games to annihilate his former career-high of 56.
http://canucks.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=546899

D Sean O'Donnell



1173 GP
19:29TOI/G
1790 PIM
x1 SC Champ ('07)


Last edited by Rob Scuderi: 10-27-2011 at 04:41 PM.
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10-27-2011, 01:28 AM
  #39
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LW Doug Smail



1990 NHL ASG
459 Points in 845 Games
30 goals once, 20 three other times, 28 SH throughout career

Smail will see time on the top PK unit and play on our fourth line. He was a great skater who played a defensive role in his career. He was sent to the minors for the first and only time as a 35 year old, not bad for a player described as lacking offensive sense/skill.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
An all-American at the University of North Dakota, Doug Smail was an outstanding collegiate player. He was named to the NCAA Championships all-tournament team in 1980 as well as being awarded the tournament's MVP.

Smail signed with the Winnipeg Jets as a free agent in 1980 and remained a Jet for ten years. He made his NHL debut in the 1980-81 season and had his finest season in point production in 1984-85 collecting 66 points.

After Smail played in the NHL All-Star Game in 1990, the Jets traded him to the Minnesota North Stars where he finished out the 1990-91 season and signed with the Quebec Nordiques as a free agent. The upstart Ottawa Senators came calling in their inaugural season of 1992-93 and signed Smail as a free agent. He left the NHL after this year.

Smail moved to Britain where he played for three more seasons before retiring from the game in 1996.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
The key to being a good hockey player is being able to skate. If you can skate really well you can last a long time. Few could skate better than Doug Smail.

Smail was phenomenally quick, probably the quickest skater during the 1980s. He was a very intelligent skater as well, as he often would skate at less than full board in order to throw off his check. This unpredictability led to a lengthy career as a penalty killer and defensive left winger
G Andy Aitkenhead



The Glasgow Gobbler had a very brief but illustrious NHL career. He played every single game in net for the Rangers his first two seasons and finished 4th and 5th in GA. He won the Stanley Cup his first season leading the Ranger with a 1.60GAA and 2 shutouts in 8GP. He finished his second seasons with 7 shutouts, and with only 2 goals given up in two playoff games. We hope his playoff and SC experience will make him a good backup for Palmateer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
A standout for two full seasons with the New York Rangers from 1932 to 1934, Aikenhead took over the starting job from John Ross Roach and for two years was a solid if unspectacular netminder. He had played ten years in various minor leagues out west, most notably appearing in the Allan Cup finals in 1924 and 1926 with Saskatoon.

Aitkenhead's rookie season of 1932-33 was a Stanley Cup-winning one as he played all eight games for the Broadway Blueshirts, winning six and recording two shutouts en route to the championship in four games over Toronto. At 29, Aitkenhead looked set to be the team's goalie of the future.

After playing every game of the following season, though, the team was eliminated from the playoffs quickly and he lost the starter's job the next season to Davey Kerr. Aitkenhead played just ten games, and spent the next six seasons in the PCHL, retiring in 1941.
He was also a bit out there,

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelletier
"When I joined the Rangers I replaced Andy Aitkenhead. They tell me he got so he'd lock himself in his room after a game and play the game over and over. By the time the next game rolled around, he'd played 48 games in that room."

Such neurotic behavior must have worried the Rangers brain trust enough to look for a replacement goalie, and they obviously found one in Kerr. The man dubbed as "The Glasgow Gobbler" appeared in just 10 games in 1934-35 season and finished the year in the minors, never to play in the NHL again.

Whether the stories of Aitkenhead's obsessions are myth or fact, Andy continued to play hockey for several more seasons.

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10-27-2011, 01:30 AM
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Coach Mike Buckna



IIHF HoF
BC Sports HoF
Czech Hockey HoF

Silver in '48 Olympics
Gold in '47 WC



Quote:
Originally Posted by Eliteprospects
Natural born coach, great player and kind person. Mike (Matej - as he was called in Czechoslovakia) Buckna was a son of Slovak parents, that emigrated to Canada. In Autumn 1935 he came to Czechoslovakia to see the country of his parents. He bound his career with LTC Praha (as a player-coach). First season he was playing with czechoslovak star Josef Malecek. In the three following seasons he was leading the second formation of LTC Praha. In 1938 he was appointed as a head coach of Czechoslovak national team. After winning bronze medal in 1938 he said, that he have team of good men, that want to battle for their coutry and that he is proud of them. After WC in 1939, his work was interrupted by WW2. After it, in 1946 he answered the call from Czechoslovakia to come back from Canada and coach national team once again. He led Czechoslovakia to gold medals in 1947 and to silver medals on Olympic games in 1948. In February 1948 his work for national team was interrupted once again. Communists made the coup d´état and in Czechoslovakia started the years of dire terror. Buckna came back to Canada. He was returning occasionaly to Czechoslovakia in 1970´ and 1980´. He died January 6, 1996 in Milwaukee, USA. (Jan Jech)
http://www.eliteprospects.com/player.php?player=78755

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trail Historical Society
In 1946, the family returned to Prague where Mike was given the opportunity to coach the Czechoslovakian National Hockey team and was the coordinator of the entire Czech hockey system. He taught the kind of hockey played in Trail - conditioning and passing. He pioneered hockey clinics, coached senior and junior teams and started minor hockey for several thousand youngsters throughout the country. The result: a world hockey power.

Mike coached the Czech Olympic Team in the 1948 Olympics. The team only lost one game in those Olympics and that was to Canada. Mike's team won a silver medal. He also led the Czech National Team to three European titles and one world championship, in 1947. Shortly after the Olympics, the Russians occupied Czechoslovakia and Mike and his family had to return to Trail. He regained employment with Cominco and continued to play hockey for the Trail Smoke Eaters.

After his retirement from playing, Mike coached the Rossland Warriors and the Trail Junior Smoke Eaters. Mike was actively involved with hockey, both in Trail and Czechoslovakia, for almost fifty years.

In 1978, as the guest of the Czechoslovakian Hockey Federation, Mike was introduced as the "Father of Czechoslovakian Hockey."

In 1989, Mike received a major honour in his life. He was inducted into the British Columbia Sports Hall of Fame.
http://www.trailhistory.com/monument...n=display&id=8

Quote:
At a time when the rest of European hockey stressed defense, LTC’s offensive orientated style stood out in stark contrast, influencing both Team Moscow Head Coach Arkady Chernyshev and Player-Coach Anatoli Tarasov. This style would have an impact on the future direction of the so-called 'Soviet hockey system.' The Czech’s play had been the creation of Mike Buckna from Trail, British Columbia. Buckna, while visiting Prague in 1935, decided to offer his services as a player/coach to the Prague LTC club. At the time, LTC had already established itself as one of the top club teams in Europe and had gained respect in 1934 in Canada with its 1-0 win over the World Champion Saskatoon Quakers, in 1934. At the age of 21, the former Trail Smoke Eater had become one of the top players on the Prague club.

Czechoslovakian hockey was traditionally a very defensive style with defensemen rarely touching the puck in the offensive end and with the forwards dropping back to cover the net. Even with LTC’s achievements Buckna believed the defensive coaching philosophy adopted by the Czechoslovakians was stale and limiting the development and success of their hockey

Buckna saw hockey as a game built on the offensive fundamentals of passing, puck-handling, and forechecking. By the end of his first season in Prague, Buckna had already begun holding coaching clinics. The following year, at the age of 22, he was invited to run the Czechoslovakian National Team program. Buckna would stay in Prague until 1939 departing only when all Canadian coaches and players were evacuated just ahead of the Nazi annexation.

Years after the war, Buckna would return to Czechoslovakia where he would rebuild the nucleus of a great team utilizing former juniors he had coached before the war. In 1947, he led the Czech’s to their first World Championship and in 1948 he coached Czechoslovakia to the silver medal at the Winter Olympics. After the Olympic Games, Buckna returned home to Canada leaving a team and a system built largely on his techniques and philosophy.

It would be the Buckna concepts used in Czechoslovakia which the Russians would draw upon to create their own offensive orientated system. It was Buckna’s theories on how the game should be played, evident in the success of his Czechoslovakian team, which largely shaped what would eventually become the European style of hockey...

Tarasov’s critical opinion of other countries reliance on Canadian hockey specialists is ironic given the realization that his so-called 'Soviet hockey system' was not the invention of Tarasov, nor any other Russian. Rather, it had been largely copied from Buckna and a Toronto-based Canadian sports exercise and sports conditioning expert, Lloyd Percival.
http://boxscorenews.com/red-storm-ru...ey-p559-68.htm

Another somewhat clunky translation so I apologize. This link is in Czech originally and is dedicated to the LTC club but it's the only mention of his defensive coaching abilities I've found thus far.

Quote:
This excellent player and later coach of the LTC and the representation of Czechoslovakia had real name Mike Buckna, but for his Slovak origin, he said Matej Buckna.

In his native country came so that it responded to an advertisement that you could actually LTC and the Czechoslovak team in the Canadian newspaper. The country went third-class and because he had no ticket, had it right on the boat to work. Once arrived in Prague, demonstrated what it can and has been accepted without hesitation. He discovered a lot of hockey for our talents, is also called the Father of Czechoslovak hockey.

Since joining LTC in the season 1935-1936 he worked at the club and representation to the beginning of the war. After the meeting with the defender into his old home back. Coached and played in LTC as well as in representation. He won for us the first world title. In our hockey brought new elements of training, games, players learned to defend the great personalities, but also a friend to players who have it fully respected.

At the end of his work in LTC and representation came into conflict with Vladimir Zábrodský. He was coach of world champions in 1947, with further success two years later, not because they emigrated abroad.
http://www.ltcpraha.ic.cz/treneri-fu...ce=profil&id=4

LW Paul Ranheim



PK ace will serve as a spare along with O'Donnell

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
In 1988-89, Ranheim turned pro, playing most of his first season with the Salt Lake City Golden Eagles of the IHL. His second year brought a full-time promotion to the NHL with the Flames. By that time, he was definitely NHL material. Over the five seasons that followed, he played a well-rounded game balanced by impeccably sound defensive coverage in his own zone plus versatility up front as a quick-skating winger who could skate on either side of centre. He also packed a pretty decent wrist shot that made his Flames' stint the most offensively prolific of his career.

Near the end of the 1993-94 campaign, however, his role underwent a shift with his trade to the Hartford Whalers. His new assignment was more in the vein of a defensive specialist. His offensive numbers naturally declined while his team remained on the outside looking in at the playoffs each year. Ranheim made the transition from Hartford to Carolina in 1997 and remained with the club until his trade to the Philadelphia Flyers in 2000.

Ranheim spent parts of three seasons in Philly, before he was acquired by the Phoenix Coyotes early in the 2002-03 season. After only one season with the Coyotes, Ranheim retired from the game following the season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pelletier
Ranheim was always the faster skater on the ice. He rocketed around the rink like an Yvan Cournoyer or a Russ Courtnall. While his speed created many scoring opportunities at the University of Wisconsin and in the minor leagues, at the NHL level he just lacked creativity and hand skills to be much of an offensive force. He merited little power play time, partly because his shot was astonishingly inaccurate.

But Ranheim became a top defensive player. His speed obviously allowed him to keep up with any defensive assignment. He played a solid physical game, although he was not much of an initiator. He had good defensive reads and good anticipation, making him a fixture on the penalty kill.

C Andre Savard



482PTS in 790GP

Two-way player had one big offensive year but otherwise was generally a 40 point player. He also played on the PK and received a negligible amount of Selke votes one year. Only a minus player once in his career, -3 in his final season.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellensburg Daily Record
Andre Savard, not known primarily as a goal-scorer, reached the 20-goal mark halfway through the season Sunday night with his first three-goal National Hockey League...Savard personally overcame a 1-0 Cleveland lead by scoring three times within a 6:26 span during the first period for a "pure" hat trick.

"He was always on a line to check," noted the Buffalo coach, who club acquired Savard for that purpose. "Now he's playing with one of the best goal scorers in the league (winger Rick Martin) and things rub off. That line is really going."
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...d+hockey&hl=en

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10-27-2011, 01:32 AM
  #41
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RW/C David Backes



221PTS in 371GP
30Gx2
2nd +/- 2011
9th PIM 2009

2011 ASG
7th Selke 2011


Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
A hard-working forward with a nose for the net, serving as team captain Backes capped off his three year stint at Minnesota State-Mankato by racking up a career high 42 points. At the conclusion of his college season, Backes signed with the St. Louis Blues and appeared in 12 games with their AHL affiliate in Peoria. He began his first full professional season in Peoria and struggled with consistency at times, however would go on to spend the second half of his season with the St. Louis Blues. His play improved as the season progressed and he proved to be one of the Blues' top forwards.

Backes' offensive production continued to improve in St. Louis. He notched his first 30-goal season in 2008-09 and in February of 2010 he was part of the US Olympic team that brought home the silver medal in a thrilling overtime final at the Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver.
Olympian and 3 WC, which saw him rack up 74 PIM in the three tournaments.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VI's Profile of Backes
ASSETS: Has size, hockey sense, a nose for the net and plenty of grit and determination. Is a tremendous body checker. Can play both center and wing.

FLAWS: Sometimes, he is too aggressive and gets caught out of position or takes bad penalties. His scoring lacks consistency.
Assistant Coach Glen Sonmor



Former Head coach of North Stars leads them a record 177-161-83 in 421 games coached. More notable was the playoff success had with those teams, which were thought to overachieve having to pull off some upsets. His tenure in with the North Stars ended unceremoniously after a drunken fight at a bar in Pittsburgh with a Penguins fan. He stepped down and entered treatment for alcoholism. He admitted that the pressure of the job had gotten to him and fueled his problems.

His coaching career began in the junior and collegiate levels most notaby with University of Minnesota. Sonmor coached the Golden Gopher Hockey Team from 1966 - 1971, which included a Western Collegiate Hockey Association (WCHA) regular season championship in the 1969-70 season and a WCHA playoff championship in the 1970-71 season.

In 2006, Sonmor was awarded the Lester Patrick Trophy for outstanding service to hockey in the United States along with Steve Yzerman, Marcel Dionne, Reed Larson, and Red Berenson

His role with the Mallards as an assistant coach should help alleviate Sonmor's previous struggles. He helps fill in some of the more unclear areas of Buckna's coaching abilities. He preached hard work and physicality which will compliment Buckna's offensively geared system, which provides no explicit mention of physicality. Sonmor's teams also successfully shut down some of the greatest offensive defenders in Salming and Robinson during the postseason showing his ability to develop a successful a defensive and/or penalty kill scheme. His teams PK was also above the league average every year for what it's worth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Evening Independent
A time-tested strategy worked wonders for the Minnesota North Stars.
In their first-round National Hockey League playoff series against the Toronto Maple Leafs, the North Stars put all the pressure they could on Toronto defenseman Borje Salmng, who generates a great deal of the Maples Leafs' offense.

That helped Minnesota to a three-game sweep in that best-of-five series. So Wednesday night, in their quarter-final opener against the defending Stanley Cup champion Montreal Canadiens, the North Stars tried it again - on Montreal Standout Larry Robinson. And it worked in Game 1, anyway, when the North Stars stunned the Canadiens 3-0 to star their best of seven series.

"Throw a blanket over Salming and you eliminate the offensive thrust to a certain degree," said Minnesota Coach Glen Sonmor. "That's exactly what we wanted to do with Robinson. We wanted to make him give up the puck whenever he got it so he didn't make any of those great end-to-end rushes."

"I was really amazed with the way we played in the first period," Sonmor said. "When I looked up and saw we were outshooting them 14-1, it really startled me. But it was a very good feeling."
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...m&hl=en%20%20G


Quote:
Originally Posted by Calgary Herald
"With Glen (Sonmor), we seem to be having more fun than before. He wants us to just go out and work hard. With the players we have, there's so must talent, you shouldn't be putting any restrictions" -Willi Plett

In discussing what he's doing differently, Sonmor poinpointed a number of problem areas on the team: Not enough hitting, not enough game-day preparation, and too much complaining about a lack of ice time.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...r+system&hl=en

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
"Apparently he (the fan) didn't like our hockey club and let me know about it," Sonmor said "I asked him if he wanted to [fight], and he did." Sonmor said the more he thought about the fight, the more realized he was under too much pressure and that he was no longer enjoying his profession.
http://news.google.com/newspapers?id...n+sonmor&hl=en


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Old
11-04-2011, 06:35 PM
  #42
VanIslander
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Jack Brannen was the center/rover for the best team in hockey in 1899 and 1900, one of four stars described as a forward tandem. He was 5th and 10th in league scoring those two years, scoring goals in three different stanley cup challenge series. He is one of the fastest players of his era, certainly at that time.

The reason why Brannen was a center/rover was he alternated positions with Trihey. In 1899 Brannen was tied with linemate Farrell for 5th in CAHL scoring with 8 goals, Trihey leading the league with 19. In 1900 CAHL Brannen was top-10 in league scoring with 6 goals, behind league leader and linemate Trihey (17) and linemate Farrell (9).

Brannen scored a goal against Winnipeg in a close 3-2 Stanley Cup challenge defense of their cup on February 14, 1900, and he scored three goals in two games against Halifax in another Stanley Cup challenge defense in March. The following season (Jan 29th 1901) Brannen scored a goal in a close 4-3 loss to Winnipeg in a Stanley Cup challenge re-match.



Quote:
On March 14, 1899, and again on March 7, 1900, three Loyola pioneers starred with the Montreal Shamrocks as the team won the Stanley Cup in two consecutive years.

In 1893-4 Harry Trihey (Captain), Arthur Farrell and Jack Brannen were a force on the hockey team at Collège Ste-Marie, out of which came Loyola College, one of the founding institutions of Concordia University.

The Shamrocks hockey team grew out of the Shamrocks Lacrosse team, world champions at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. It was an era of religious prejudice and Catholics did not play on the wasp-dominated teams of the Amateur Hockey Association (AHA). The Shamrocks hockey team was started with support from pastor John Quinlivan of St. Patrick’s Church (now basilica). The Shamrocks joined the AHA in 1895 and the newly-formed Canadian Amateur Hockey League in 1898.

The Shamrocks won the Stanley Cup on March 1,1899 by defeating the Montreal Victorias 1-0 before 8,000 people in the new Montreal arena at the corner of Wood and Ste-Catherine streets. On March 14 they defended the cup 6-2 in a challenge from Queen’s University.

The Shamrocks won the Cup again in 1900 when they defeated the Winnipeg Victorias on February 16, and successfully defended the title against Halifax on March 7, 1900.

As hockey moved into the 20th century, the coveted Stanley Cup occupied a prominent place in the Montreal Shamrocks’ clubhouse.

Jack Brannen, known as the fastest skater of his day, went on to fight in World War I and became a physician. Team captain Harry Trihey was the principal organizer of the 55th regiment of the Irish Rangers, and later became a prominent Montreal lawyer and businessman. Arthur Farrell died a young man. Besides the power line of forwards Trihey, Brannen and Farrell, the team included... Fred Scanlan
http://archives3.concordia.ca/timeli...shamrocks.html

Quote:
One of the great forward lines around the turn of the century was comprised of three players who were to be elected into the Hockey Hall of Fame -- Harry Trihey, Arthur Farrell, and Frederick Scanlan. This unit played for the Montreal Shamrocks. Scanlan joined the club in 1897-98 and quickly became part of the forward foursome, which also included Jack Brannen at rover.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...io&list=ByName

Quote:
The fastest skater in hockey, Brannen was the world champion speed skater in the 220 yard distance in 1900.
http://books.google.ca/books?id=rXla...hockey&f=false

In February 1900, the Montreal Shamrocks won a close three-game Stanley Cup challenge series against Bain's Winnipeg Victorias, Brannen scoring a key goal in the one-goal deciding third game (he scored goals in four different Stanley Cup games over three different challenge series). He als had no less than seven noteworthy defensive plays in the February 1900 Stanley Cup series, using his great speed in a checking capacity, as the quotes from the Toronto Star newspaper reports of the following days show:

Quote:
Stanley Cup Match.
Monday Night’s Game a Curtain Raiser to the Others:
The series for the Stanley Cup championship which will open on Monday evening in the Arena rink between the Shamrock and Victorias of Winnipeg will be without doubt the greatest contests which have taken place since the introduction of the national winter game. When it is considered that the visitors are coming hundreds of miles to try and capture a trophy that carries with it the title of the hockey championship of the world, an idea may be obtained of the importance of the games the result of which will be watched with the keenest interest in every city and town in Canada, from the Atlantic to the Pacific. No matches in the athletic world have ever engaged such general attention. At Winnipeg the Victorias were given a send off on their trip eastwards that was fit for a King. Every leading city in Canada within a day’s travel of Montreal will have its representation at the rink side, while the citizens of Montreal of every class and sex, the hot enthusiasts, and the phlegmatic occasional spectators who only witness such events on rare occasions, all will be there to see the great contest.

Some people, and they represent a goodly number of pretty level headed sports, say that the Shamrocks will lose the cup this time. When asked for an explanation in support of such a peculiar opinion and one at variance of all past experience when it is considered that the men that the prophets of evil select for defeat have won every game they have played this year, they shrug their shoulders and say, time will tell. Perhaps it may be that these young men are in possession of some information not vouchsafed to the Shamrock management who are quite satisfied about the capabilities of their boys. Be that as it may the Shamrocks goal, point, cover point, Captain Trihey and his three lieutenants, never faced a foe that will be more worthy of their steel and hickory than the one which is now speeding eastwards with big physique and stout hearts. Yes - the Shamrocks have need for caution on Monday night, and Wednesday night too. They must play as a one man machine. There must be no monkeying on the part of any man on the defence end in order to gratify a desire to take a run and a little frolic down the ice leaving his citadel at the mercy of a lively and astute forward man of the opposing side. There must be none of the greedy man style manifested by the forwards when an opening occurs, because such a policy or style of play can only have one result and that is disaster for the side of the man who adopts it.

WINNIPEG TEAM WON
The First Match in the Series for the Stanley Cup is Theirs by a Majority of One Game.

The Winnipeg team won.
They deserved their victory, but if it had come the Shamrock way, the Shamrocks would have deserved it equally.
It was the greatest hockey match that has ever been played in Montreal. The greatest, because both teams under the circumstances were evenly matched; because both teams put forth their best efforts, and because both teams played fair, honest, unobjectionable hockey.
The merits of the play on both sides were almost equal. The odd game might have gone to either team. Both suffered from the disadvantage of the condition in which the change of weather and the additional heat produced by the great crowd had put the ice. That the pace was as fast as the players made it, was little short of marvelous. In the second half they simply plowed through it, and though the Winnipeggers were heavier, and probably went deeper, their very make-up enabled them to stand the fatigue better than the lighter Shamrocks.
If the Shamrocks made any serious mistake, it probably was in being too careful at the beginning. From their after play, it was proven that the Winnipeg team was not by any means at its best then, and instead of taking advantage of this the Shamrocks kept on the defensive and allowed the puck for a great length of time to remain near the Shamrock goal, where the Winnipeggers managed to keep it, without scoring, however. On the whole, the beginning of the match was slow, and though the Shamrocks occasionally tried one of their lightning rushes there were times when things appeared decidedly dull. The western men, no doubt feeling their way, appeared to be unable to shoot, at least not in the way in which the Shamrocks are accustomed to do it, with a rush and without stopping, as it were, to pick up the puck. That impression was dispelled shortly afterwards, however. They picked up their confidence gradually, and did not leave the slightest doubt existing about the superiority of their present team over that of last year. The work of both teams after they were well started was magnificent, and the encouragement of the crowd helped to keep them up to it. It was almost impossible to distinguish, as far as volume and heartiness went, between the cheers that were given for the Shamrocks and the visitors, and when the final gong sounded, and the few men who accompanied the Winnipeg team from home rushed on the ice and put Bain on their shoulders, hundreds of the male spectators joined them, and carried him in procession to the dressing room. The scene towards the end of the match was naturally the most exciting.
The score stood four to three in favour of the Winnipeg team, and there was just a bare chance, that it might be tied, before the bell rang for the finish. The Shamrocks made desperate efforts to score the necessary goal. Rush followed rush, and onslaught came upon the heels of onslaught but when just two minutes before the end Tansey was ruled off for making Bain turn the prettiest somersault, that any trick skater could show, a sort of general feeling seemed to suddenly pervade the crowd that it was all up with the home team.
The referee gave the utmost satisfaction, and did about as much actual work as any of the team. He had to move his legs very fast to follow the game, and keep his eyes wide open, to watch the movements of the players. For a wonder, he blew his whistle almost sharp on time, and for another wonder the two teams were there to respond to it. The visitors came in through the South entrance, and the Shamrocks broke through the Eastern breach of the bulwarks of the rink. Many of the Winnipeg men wore bits of Shamrock ribbon on their breasts.

SHAMROCKS EVENED UP THE SCORE
BRILLIANT AND DASHING PLAY DEFEATED THE ALMOST INVINCIBLE WINNIPEGS.

The Shamrocks won!
That was the first thought, the first exclamation after the gong announced the finish of last night’s match, and swift as lightning, thought and speech combined, in the expression: “This means another match.”
Strange as it may seem the last idea was the predominant one as the rink emptied itself. For the people who sympathized with the Shamrocks were glad because another match gave the splendid team they favoured another chance. The people who sympathized with the wonderful men that composed the Winnipeg team, while regretting last night’s defeat, were glad because they are certain that their team will win out in the end, and the people who favoured neither team, and came to see the finest hockey, that was ever played in the universe, were glad because they would be enabled to see another such struggle as has never been seen before, and as may never be seen again after this series is finished.
“Another match! Another match!” was the cry, and the ladies lost no time in telling their escorts, how not to neglect the purchase of tickets early in the morning, and the poor escorts racked their brains, to find means of leaving their business long enough to obtain these tickets, for there is bound to be such a rush today, as will even surpass that for the Irving performances at the Academy.
The Shamrocks won, and they won on their merits. No one, be he friend or foe of the winning team denied that. They played the best hockey, and though the Winnipeg men put up a game, such as has never been played by a losing team, they lost because they played not as well particularly in the second half. Their team play was inferior to that of their opponents, and their opponents were faster, but the Winnipeggers’ endurance seemed greater, and if the match could have been prolonged they might have changed the score. The Shamrocks used up every bit of energy, every atom of intelligence, every honourable policy at their command. They gauged the time at their disposal to a nicety and won. That is the secret of their victory. They moved, and turned and twisted at the word of command, so seldom heard by the spectators.
They skated five, sometimes six at a time, to the attack, and when one of the fast Winnipeg men made one of those rushes which surpassed everything that is known, they, like a flash, were at the other end of the rink again and presented a solid front to the enemy. In the second half they were equally strong in attack or defence, and their passing was faultless.
In the first half the Winnipeg work was remarkable. They were recklessly brave and brilliantly wise. In the second half they were brilliantly cautious, if such a term can be applied to the very fastest hockey that was ever played by any team that has opposed the holders of the Stanley Cup.
Last Monday night there was a splendid match. The finest witnessed in every respect, in Montreal. No one thought it could have been surpassed. Last night, with a hard, glassy sheet of ice, it was better. As good, but no better, can be seen in the future. Men cannot skate faster, play fairer or shoot straighter than these two wonderful teams did last night. The eye was hardly quick enough to follow their evolutions. The white sparks which the skates struck from the frozen surface, glittering and glowing in the electric light, almost dazzled the sight; the mixture of red and white bodies gyrating and twisting and flashing past one another in endless, restless, riotous tangle, confused; and the poor, little, persecuted puck chased hither and thither, now here, now there, now high, now low, sought rest a dozen times in the lap of some fair lady spectator. The tireless, quick-eyed, nimble-footed, fullwinded referee, in the dark jersey, unconsciously seemed to bring order out of seeming chaos, and had to jump and run to evade the apparently revengeful rubber, which seemingly blamed him for the unmerciful buffeting it received, singled him out many times as its particular prey. As to noise, there was so much of it, that half the time there seemed to be none. The ear became accustomed to the continuous howls; men and women shouted without knowing it, and only when Barney Dunphy, the Shamrock trainer, let out one of his prolonged roars, now resembling that of a wounded desert lion - when his men got the worst of it - and again like that of a cage full of captive tigers spying their dinner - when his boys won - did the crowd realize how hoarse they would be on the morrow. And such a good natured, such a fair, such a just crowd; showering such impartial approval, such honest tributes upon both teams alike. Yet it could not have been otherwise, for there was really nothing in the match to criticize and everything to commend. There were no fouls worth mentioning. Those that occurred were two cases of tripping which the referee saw, and for which he promptly ruled off two Winnipeg men, and a few other cases, perhaps on the part of other players, which he did not see.

Some of the Winnipeg supporters rubbed Gingras’ stick for luck. The same honours that were tendered to Bain on Monday were tendered to Trihey last evening, and when they carried him in a long procession off the ice, the curtain fell on a match that was a credit to the Shamrock team, a credit to the Winnipeg team, and, above all, a credit to Montreal.
“I never saw such work” said President “Jack” Armytage, “It was magnificent.”
“The generalship exhibited by Harry Trihey was wonderful” said ex-president Code.
“You won fairly and squarely and deserved your victory” was Captain Bain’s opinion.
When players began to arrive at the rink and saw the splendid sheet of ice, there were sighs of relief and every man expressed pleasure at the sight. The ice was just right and it was possible to carry the puck along without any over exertion, such as was required on Monday night’s heavy slushy ice. This fast ice proved this. That the Shamrocks were just superior to their opponents under such conditions as existed last night. Their stick work was better and they were faster man for man. Jack Brannen proved his ability to catch Bain and more than once he foiled the big Winnipeg forward as he was about to shoot.
Both Campbell and Gingras played a strong, effective game, but they had not the same opportunities as on Monday night, and there were not the same wide openings for them to go through. Both Scanlan and Farrell played a far superior game, and Scanlan’s work was particularly good. He carried the puck out time after time, and went down the ice in great style, and had he been fortunate in his shooting there ought to have been some goals to his credit. Farrell did well, and when it is understood that he was suffering from a peculiar indisposition, the excellence of his work will be better appreciated. Jack Brannen’s speed was a great factor in the game, and his work was a vast improvement over his previous form. Harry Trihey showed cool generalship, and his work was in every way worthy of the leader of such a splendid team. The defence played a splendid game, and were hardly to be blamed for the scoring done against them. Wall’s lifts and rushes and Tansey’s stops and rushes were features. In the second half Tansey made more than one beautiful rush, and on one occasion almost tallied a score. McKenna’s work was just right. The work of the whole team could not be improved on, and they gave the greatest exhibition of unselfish team play ever seen before.
And the Victorias.
Well, they were in the position that the Shamrocks were in a few days previous. The pace was a killing one, and it looked as if the Victorias found it a bit harder than the Shamrocks, but they made a great struggle and in the last few minutes were battling in splendid style. The Winnipeg men were fortunate in the goals that they did score, but they were, at the same time unfortunate in some instances where a goal seemed likely, but was lost through failure to seize the opportunity presented. Their defence was good, and Johnstone played a particularly good game. Flett seemed to have fallen off a bit, but “Whitey” Merritt exhibited his usual skill.

The toss fell to the Shamrocks, and Capt. Trihey chose to defend the south goal. At 8.30 referee Hugh Baird blew his whistle and the great contest commenced. The Victorias assumed the aggressive in the initial stages. There was a rush. Bain fell at a critical moment and the attack was repulsed. Then Trihey took the puck to the Winnipeg end, but lost to Johnstone, who lifted back neatly. Frank Tansey was ready for it and the puck was sent out. Bain returned with the rubber, but Trihey crossed his path and got away with it. He fell and Johnstone sent it back. There was a smart exchange of lifts until Scanlan nailed the rubber and carried it to the Winnipeg poles by a magnificent run. A quick pass to Trihey and a shot followed. The puck was too high, however, and went off the ice, necessitating a face at the Vic poles. It was back again and a Shamrock offside caused another face. Bain kicked the puck out of dangerous position and carried it clear, but lost to Wall. Campbell secured the lift and had a shot after a good run. Tansey caught it and quickly cleared. A beautiful rush by Brannen, Trihey and Farrell brought the crowd up, but an offside saved what looked like a score. Bain had another chance, but Tansey spoiled it and Campbell being offside caused a face near the Shamrock poles. Gingras looked dangerous for a second; but was heavily checked by Scanlan, for which the latter received a warning. Farrell now had the puck and sailed down in good style, only to be tripped in front of the Vic poles. The Shamrock man was in a splendid position and this saved a likely score. Trihey had a chance, too, but Roxburgh landed on him in time and received a warning for tripping. Both teams were now doing excellent work. Both goals had been assailed in turn and it was difficult to choose between either. Bain saved his goal and got clear with a splendid run, but Wall took him off his feet with a good body check. Back came the Winnipeg captain, but this time Jack Brannen swept down on him and checked in time; Roxburgh made a flying dash at the Shamrock defence and landed in the net, while the puck flew down to the other end. Now Winnipeg faced the game and had the Shamrocks back in their own territory. Johnstone tried a rush, but Wall stopped him. There was a fierce scrimmage at the Shamrock poles. A timely check by Brannen sent the puck off the ice. Campbell sent in a fine shot, which was stopped, and then Bain received a warning for tripping Trihey. Gingras made a gallant attempt, but Farrell and Trihey caught him. Bain managed to get the puck and shot, but as Wall sent him in the air it was a bit wide. There was a flash of gray and green and Brannen shot out of the bunch at meteor like speed, a pass to Scanlan, a quick dodge, a well judged pass to Trihey, a smart shot and the Shamrocks had first blood. Time, 20 minutes.
On the instant the whole arena was one moving mass of humanity and the cheer that followed Trihey’s shot was a wonderful volume of sound.
There was a determined rush, and Winnipeg forced matters in the opening of the second game. McKenna stopped a corker from Campbell. Farrell and Trihey got away with the puck, but were brought up by Johnstone. The puck was sent off the ice at the Shamrock poles. Tansey stopped a hot one from the face and Scanlan carried the puck out by a beautiful run. He passed to Trihey, who shot, striking Flett. Bain shot out, but only got as far as Wall, but Roxburgh secured the puck on the return. However, the latter’s shot was caught by Brannen, who slid in front of the poles in time and stopped what seemed a likely score. Tansey caught a beautiful one from Campbell and there was a scrimmage in the poles. Wall took it out and went down, but was tripped when he got to Johnstone. The play now slackened for a time, the forwards taking a breathing spell. Bain had a shot, which McKenna stopped and lifted out. The puck landed in centre, where Johnstone was awaiting it. He lifted quickly and the puck bounded by the defence men and nestled in the net, evening the score in 8 minutes.
The ease of this performance was astonishing, but it caught the fancy of the crowd, and they cheered as justily as when the home team notched up their goal.
The Winnipeg boys let loose their enthusiasm, and had a gay time generally.
The start of the third game found the Shamrocks on the attack. Farrell went down and passed over to Scanlan, whose shot was stopped by Merritt. Roxburgh brought the rubber out of dangerous ground and sailed down to McKenna, who stopped a nice one. Tansey cleared out to centre. Here Johnstone caught it lifted on the jump and the puck bounded on to Wall and slid into the net, putting Winnipeg one to the good in one minute.
This looked ominous, but the Shamrocks pulled themselves together and forced the play until the end of the half. Scanlan sent in one splendid shot, which Merritt stopped. A rush by Wall ended in Roxburgh tripping him and a warning was issued to the Winnipeg man. Half time was reached with matters in this stage.
The second half started hammer and tongs, and the speed was terrific. Campbell got away, but Farrell caught him and brought the puck down. There was a fierce onslaught on the Winnipeg poles, and some magnificent defence work warded off the Shamrock attack. There was an off-side, which caused a face near the Victoria goals. Gingras tried to get out, but Scanlan swiped at the puck and sent it off the ice. After the face Roxburgh sent it off and another face followed. There was a lightning dash to the Shamrock end, but McKenna was on the alert and kept the puck out. Bain tried to hook one through, but Brannen landed on him and the puck was knocked off the ice. Scanlan took charge of the puck and went down. Gingras tripped him, and was immediately sent off. The play continued. Brannen went in behind and sent the puck out. Farrell had a try, which failed, but he managed to get it again and slid it to Brannen, who was in an excellent position and sent it in, making the score two all.
This performance was greeted with a wild outburst, and the Shamrock following let themselves out in great style.
It proved to be the turning point of the game, and from this out it looked Shamrock’s way.
Winnipeg appeared to be suffering from the speed of the game and although they were struggling hard, it took a few minutes in this game before they got down to real business. Scanlan carried the rubber into Victoria territory, but was tripped by Johnstone, which probably saved a score. The Shamrocks kept hammering away and the Victorias were forced to play on the defensive, Bain broke away, but Brannen caught him. Gingras was now on again and this brightened up the Vics play a bit. There was another dash by Bain, but Tansey caught him. Farrell got away and sent the puck over to Scanlan, who got down in smart style. Now the game was fast and exciting. Bain tripped Trihey and was sent off for two minutes. A rush by Roxburgh looked likely as he got by Wall, but Tansey caught him. Roxburgh made a spirited attempt, and sailed by Wall, only to fall a victim to Tansey. Bain was on again and made matters interesting for awhile. He made one dangerous charge, but Tansey secured the puck and batted it to one side. Here Scanlan secured it and broke clear of Gingras. He flew down the ice, went by Johnstone. A nice pass to Trihey followed, and a beautiful shot landed the deciding goal in the net.
Oh such a cheer.
Every one who had the least sympathy for the Shamrocks arose, and the cheer that came from those enthusiastic throats was a joyful one. There yet remained fourteen minutes to play, and the fourteen minutes included some grand hockey. The Winnipeg men worked gallantly to score, but the Shamrock defence was on its mettle and Wall, Tansey and McKenna did remarkable work. Scanlan, Brannen, Trihey and Farrell kept hammering away at the Winnipeg poles in turn. But the Victorias were out for glory, too, and kept the Shamrock attacks off in great style. Once Roxburgh got away and made a splendid run to the Shamrock end. His shot was high and the puck went off the ice. There was a discussion as to where the puck should be faced, at the side or in front. It was finally forced in front, but the Shamrocks worked it away and Tansey made a spectacular rush that brought a cheer. Shamrocks took things easy sending out one or two men at a time and the gong crashed out with the puck in the centre of the ice.
And here the second chapter of the contest closed. Even the Gods are good and gentle.

THE SHAMROCKS RETAIN THE CUP
Winnipegs Satisfied That Their Opponents Won It Fairly and Squarely.
The Shamrocks retain the Stanley Cup.
The Winnipeg team, after the hardest battle since its first senior team was gotten together, lost it by one goal; a thing not unprecedented in the history of its hockey victories and defeats, for it seems fatality with the Winnipeggers to lose or win with one goal.
They deserved a better fate. They came for the second time to try and bring the cup home; they played the game in a manner which compelled the best team in this part of Canada to put forth all its strength to defeat them, and they played it in a manner that challenged the admiration of everyone who saw them.
But the Shamrocks were better, and the Shamrocks won the third and deciding game.
They, too, played the hardest game that they have ever played in their life, and they, too, deserve unbounded credit for the wonderful way in which they played it.
For that matter, both teams played throughout the series of three games as no other two senior teams have ever played before. In the first place, every one of the 3 matches was clean as clean could be, and in the next place they were the fastest exhibitions of hockey that any one, no matter where, has seen. Monday’s match, considering the heavy ice, was faster than people have been accustomed to. Tuesday’s match was faster than most people would ever have thought of; but the last eleven minutes’ play of last night’s contest beat them all. In fact, to those who watched that last eleven minutes’ play, the remainder of the match was well lost. Not because that period was more particularly brilliant than the remainder of the match, but because it was the crucial time in which the destiny of the cup was to be decided, when each team had four goals to its credit. There was a wait just previous to that, on account of a broken skate, and it was evident to everyone that the team which scored the first goal, after the play had started again, would virtually win the series. When play did start, the excitement became so intense that men even forgot to shout, but swore under their breath, while the players used their very last efforts, and there is little use denying that both teams were pretty well used up, for the pace had been fast and furious throughout the evening, to score that goal.
The fight had become in reality a desperate one. The pace was the pace that kills. Worn out as they were, and yet moving like lightning and acting with an intelligence, stimulated to a superlative sense of acuteness, by the terrible excitement under which they were labouring, there was little to choose between either team, or either’s manner of play. One minute passed, another minute passed, and a third, and nothing was accomplished on either side, beyond preventing opponents from scoring, but so many were the narrow escapes on either side, so quick and severe were the attacks made by both, so close the checking, so accurate and deliberate the team work, that the strain became almost too great to bear. Ten minutes of agony to the adherents of both teams passed in this manner, and then while Bain collided with a Shamrock man and fell prone on the ice, hurt in the head, the puck flew through the Winnipeg goal. The goal was not allowed, because the referee maintained that it took place after Bain had been hurt. It took Bain quite awhile to recover, and incidentally gave the crowd an opportunity to get back its breath, which for the last two or three minutes had been coming in short gasps.
There was then only one more minute to play, and more than ever it became a certainty that the scoring of the next goal would decide the fate of the cup. The puck was faced fairly near the Winnipeg goal, and in ten seconds Trihey had scored what was the deciding game. Almost immediately after that he broke his skate, and there had to be another wait with only twenty seconds left. When the skate was changed, there were a few turns on the ice, and all was over. No one expected that Winnipeg would manage to score another goal, but such is the feeling for a brave antagonist, that while a sigh of relief went up, when it was finally known that the cup was safe, there was mingled with it a feeling of regret that the Winnipeg team had to leave empty handed, after making such a noble fight. The ovation which the Shamrocks got this time was something never to be forgotten. So enthusiastic was it, that the spectators for nearly a quarter of an hour, remained in their seats to witness it. They were hugged and kissed, and carried away, and thrown in the air, and were no doubt, proud as they must have felt, glad to reach their dressing room after all they had gone through that night. Whatever honour was done them they deserved. By their wonderful play they upheld Montreal’s honour in the hockey world, by their fair and gentlemanly treatment of their opponents, they won the friendship and admiration of all who have witnessed these three record matches. His Excellency the Governor General dropped in during the last ten minutes. He had been induced to drive over from the patriotic entertainment, for a little while, and though His Excellency no doubt has witnessed all sorts and conditions of sport, it was easy to see that those ten minutes impressed him greatly.
“When is the next game?” he asked, and it was noticeable that he was disappointed when he was informed that such games are indeed few and far between.
And the games are over.
Games won by skill, fairly and squarely on the merits won by a great team from another great team. Won after a series of matches that is without parallel in the annals of the sport, and won after a series of matches that have never been equaled for the sportsmanlike spirit in which they were played. Games where the honour of the victors is not greater than that of the vanquished, and where all share alike in the glory that surrounds such great contest.
Think of it, three matches and there is but one goal between the two teams and each match won by one goal. That is a record to look on with pride, and the record that will go down through the course of time and mark an epoch in sport.
How was the victory won?
Let a gentleman from Winnipeg answer that question. “The Shamrocks have the greatest hockey team that ever went on the ice. Their work at every point is perfect and their team play is, without exception, the greatest that has ever been seen. The manner in which their players have been schooled has been a revelation to us, and we go home feeling proud to have been defeated by such opponents.”
There you are.
Their team is perfect. No point is left unguarded, and no advantage is permitted to remain unused. It may have often appeared to people on the side that the team is letting up, that some player is off colour, that the forwards are blocking the defence, or some other such thing is taking place, where they are mistaken. There is a sudden dash of a forward down, probably he is alone, and all attention is centred on him. There may be a scrimmage in front of the opponent’s goal and you are surprised to find a player where he was least expected and there is a shot from an unexpected quarter. An opponent gets through and finds a clear road to the Shamrock poles, and when he gets up there he finds, not only the three defence men that he knew were there, but the four forwards whom he thought were left yards in the rear.
When an opposing combination works the puck to the Shamrock poles it has not a defence alone to contend with, it has a complete team, and it is this style of game, carried on in a methodical manner, and at all times, that has won for the Shamrocks their championship, and now has been the means of successfully defending their great trophy.
That Victoria team is a splendid one. They have, with one exception, of course, the finest lot of players that ever faced a referee, and nothing but the game the Shamrocks play could ever have defeated them. They are strong, inclined to be rough, perhaps, but in a fair manner, and being big heavy men, are entitled to make use of any advantage they possess in this way. Not that they have done so, except in a legitimate manner. But hockey is a game where strength should have its place and the men who have battled in these matches are not the men to bother about a good fair check.
That defence of the Victorias is a fine one, and only such great stick handlers and such splendid shots as the Shamrocks could work their way to victory through them. Johnstone and Flett are a splendid pair to have in front of a goal, and they stood off the Shamrock attacks as no other team has done.
There were two features in last night’s matches that appealed to the audience. Your true hockey expert on the side likes to pick out some little incident, or great one for that matter, and seizes upon it as a groundwork for his opinions. In last night’s match there were two incidents that to the spectators were the telling points in the game - Arthur Farrell’s run and Harry Trihey’s shot that scored the last goal and won the match. One was equally as important as the other and each were necessary to the victory; both were magnificent and both caused a howl that was remarkable.

HOW THE CUP WAS SAVED.
At 8.27 all was ready and the game commenced.
Bain broke away and the puck went over to Gingras and the latter started his run, but Brannen jumped to the side and bore the rubber away. Gingras recovered, but was checked by Scanlan. However, the puck slid up. Wall lifted clear and Johnstone returned. There was a warm attack on the Shamrock poles. The puck was lifted away by Tansey and Gingras was offside on Johnstone’s return. The pass back gave Wall a chance and he lifted to the Victoria goal. Flett saved and batted it aside to save a score from Jack Brannen’s rush. Trihey’s check and Campbell’s run sent the puck into the side, near the peg poles. From the face the puck traveled over to Gingras and he went up and had a try at the Shamrock poles. Tansey stopped and Brannen got away like a flash with Bain’s return. Over it went to Farrell, who got down the ice and passed to Scanlan, who shot. The shot was stopped and Johnstone cross-checked Farrell, when the latter attempted to close in on Merritt. The puck was carried to the other end and Roxy had a shot. Brannen got away with the puck. Back it came with Bain in charge and a pass gave Campbell a chance, which Tansey spoiled. The Shamrock point carried the puck out, and losing it, got back in time to stop a shot from Bain. He could not clear, however, and McKenna was called upon to take care of one from Gingras, which he did. Then Tansey took one out of a nasty looking corner and got the rubber away. Scanlan got a chance and broke through to the Winnipeg end and lammed in a shot that made Whitey Merritt stand up. There was a great rush to the Shamrock stronghold and Tansey saved in great style. There was some hot work here for a few moments, and these moments were anxious ones for Shamrock hearts until Fred Scanlan got the puck and carried it out. Between Scanlan and Farrell the puck was brought into Victoria territory and Scanlan had a shot which Flett took in charge. There was an exchange of lifts between Wall and Johnstone and one puck struck McKenna and bounced off the ice. Bain tried to get in from the face, but Tansey spoiled his shot and Trihey carried the puck and had a wide shot. Campbell carried the rubber back with a splendid run and shot. McKenna stopped and Bain got another in from the rebound. McKenna stopped this, too, and Wall took the puck away from Roxy. He went down the ice. Three men jumped at him, but he bore the puck down by main strength, and it slid over to the side. Trihey had it and a second later shot it into the net, taking the first goal for the Shamrocks.
The second goal came in the way of a surprise to the Shamrocks. There was a rush by Bain and the puck was hovering around the Shamrock poles. Then Gingras had a chance and a neat side shot scored for the Victorias. This was short and sweet, and the puck was in Shamrock territory all the time.
Brannen did the trick at the face and the puck went over to Farrell, who with Trihey’s assistance got right in on the goal. Flett blocked the shot and cleared. Bain attempted to get in on McKenna, but Brannen caught him in time, and then Tansey stopped a dangerous rush by the Victoria forwards. There was a pretty run by Farrell, but an offside pass in front of the Winnipeg poles spoiled their chance. There was some end to end work and much offside play, which was promptly stopped. There was considerable play in Winnipeg half, but there was no really likely looking shot, save one which Flett attended to. There was a clear and the puck landed in Shamrock half. Bain took an offside pass and went in. When he shot Umpire Christmas put up his hand. The players did not appear to notice this, and kept on playing, Bain had his eye with him and succeeded in getting the game stopped. Then the matter was explained and the Winnipeggers were given credit for a goal. This was a damper for the Shamrocks, and the Winnipeg contingent let themselves loose in great style.
Scanlan’s rush was the first feature of the fourth game. An offside in front of the poles saved the Victorias. The puck was sent out, but Trihey and Farrell carried it down. Farrell’s pass to Trihey was just at the right spot, and the shot tallied, making the score two all. It appeared that this was a bit offside, but nobody appeared to bother and so the goal counted, but this just evened matters up.
The fifth game was remarkable for a brilliant dash by Farrell. There was a dash at the Shamrock poles. McKenna stopped a shot and the puck fell beside the post. Farrell took it. He twisted through the defence, dodged Bain, and sent off for the other end. By the time he reached centre he was traveling at a great rate. A swoop on one side and now Johnstone was passed, a glide on the other and Flett was behind, one straight path led to the goal. Farrell took it and before Merritt rightly understood the situation the puck landed just in the centre of the net and the Shamrocks were in the lead. This run of Farrell’s was just the counterpart of his famous dash last winter, which won the Montreal match, and was the prettiest bit of work done in the game to that time. It brought every man to his feet, and the applause that greeted Farrell’s performance was deafening.
The half ended without any further scoring though it was affirmed by the Shamrocks that Tansey landed the puck in the net after a brilliant dash, and there were many people who were ready to corroborate this, but it was not official, and so the goal does not go on record. Scanlan looked likely at one time, but a trip stopped his progress when he landed in front. Then he had another and met Johnstone’s body squarely with the result that he was obliged to go off for a few minutes to recuperate. Trihey missed a splendid pass in front just before the call of time.
As Gingras passed the telegraph desk he was called and a handsome bouquet of flowers was handed to him. He smilingly received them and went off the ice with the cheers of the crowd.
The Victorias opened the attack in the early stages of the second half, and Gingras sent in a hot one. Farrell carried the puck out and passed to Trihey. The latter shot wide, and Gingras carried the puck away and a rush for the Shamrock poles followed. An offside spoiled the play and Farrell followed with another. Trihey made a good dash. He was belaboured by Johnstone, for which the latter was warned. There followed a series of lifts, and the game slackened, while the forwards got a little steam. Rushes by both forward lines places both goals in jeopardy in turn. Trihey and Flett came together and both were sent off. Then Scanlan got his chance and sent a beautiful shot in scoring.
This placed the Shamrocks two to the good and matters looked easy for them. But the crowd knew nothing of the anxious moments that were to follow.
The Shamrocks kept hammering away at the Victoria goal. Trihey and Farrell lined two beauties in, but both were taken care of by Merritt. Gingras had a chance and got away to the other end and before anybody realized it he had scored on a neat side shot. This put the Victorias within hailing distance and they brightened up accordingly.
There were fifteen minutes to play and almost anything was possible.
Early in the eighth game Brannen was sent off for a fault which looked more like Gingras as the latter was holding the Shamrock man’s stick. Then Gingras got his chance and dodged in on the Shamrock defence and scored.
Consternation reigned in the Shamrock, and the little band of Winnipeg men together with their Montreal friends frantically cheered and cheered again for their favourites.
Brannen was still off and the ninth game commenced without him. Farrell got in a fine run and he and Johnstone met in the corner, Farrell rolled to his feet and the Winnipeg man followed suit. Both were promptly sent off, each asking the other what he had done. This came with five Shamrock men and six Victorias went on for awhile until Brannen jumped on and evened matters and the other pair were soon on again. Flett’s skate was loose and this caused a delay. Play being resumed Campbell went in and made a nice shot, which was stopped. There was a run by Farrell and the Winnipeg goal was in danger for a moment. Brannen had a chance, but Bain spoiled him and an offside followed. Scanlan carried the rubber in front, but Johnstone bore it away. Now the Shamrock poles were threatened, but McKenna was equal to the occasion and the scene of operations was changed by Wall’s run. Back came the puck and Campbell looked dangerous for a moment, but Farrell checked him in time. The teams were tiring rapidly and some of the men looked as if they were gone. Scanlan had a beautiful chance, but Johnstone took him off his feet and saved that. Trihey a chance, but the puck struck Flett and that was off. Then the puck went to the other end and there was a hot time until Wall carried it out. Winnipeg was hard pressed, and it looked as if they were gone. Farrell had the puck on the side and was flying in at a great rate. Bain on the other side of the ice rolled down, just as Farrell shot and the whistle just sounded before the puck landed in the net. The goal was not allowed and Bain was carried off the ice, claiming a sprained ankle. He returned and the game went on. There was just one minute to play and when this was known the excitement was intense. The face took place about twenty feet to one side of the Winnipeg poles. Brannen snapped the puck back landing it at Trihey’s stick, a quick twist and it was safely caged in the net and the Shamrocks had broken the tie just ten seconds after the sound of the whistle.
Fifty second remained to play and when thirty of them had expired Trihey’s skate broke and the game was stopped. Trihey went in for another one. Then he came out again and the puck was faced near the Shamrock poles. Brannen batted the puck aside and Trihey carried it away. Slowly the seconds passed. Finally the gong rang out and the match was over. Like an avalanche the crowd bore out on the ice cheering like mad. The teams attempting to cheer each other were swept away on the human torrent and were carried off the ice and were swallowed up in the dark entrances. The cheers of the multitude echoed and re-echoed, the tension was relieved and the Stanley Cup was safe.
Derek Thurber:
http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?ui...548&topic=3720

In a January 3rd 1900 game against the Montreal AAA (Winged Wheelers), the Shamrocks won 6-1 and the Montreal Gazette describes: "Brannen's play induced roughness" "The Shamrocks are rapidly rounding to form. Trihey and Farrell were the luminous stars last night. Brannen's speed is all there, and is well backed up by Scanlan."
http://news.google.com/newspapers?ni...pg=6420,210890

Brannen is interestingly part of a pretty impressive bunch of multiple McGill grad Stanley Cup champions:

Quote:
McGill (multiple) Stanley Cup champions

Lester Patrick (six times)
Billy Gilmour (five times)
Art Ross (five times)
Graham Drinkwater (three times)
Fred Scanlan (three times)
Jack P. Brannen (twice)
Shirley Davidson (twice)
Harry J. Trihey (twice)
Arthur F. Farrell (twice)
http://www.redmenhockey.com/press/award_winners.shtml

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11-06-2011, 06:32 AM
  #43
VanIslander
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Coach Vsevolod Bobrov is most known for bringing his squad to within a goal or two of an eight-game upset of the mighty Canadian team in the 1972 Summit Series, actually leading by two goals going into the third period of the final game playing his style, when, according to Lawrence Martin in "The Red Machine", the players abandoned the style to try and play it safe in the last frame, to no avail.

Coach Bobrov went on to win the 1973 and 1974 world championships. He had won the 1967 Soviet championships by coaching the underdog Spartak over the mighty Tarasov-coached Red Army team.

Those are four significant accomplishments. And he has a style of coaching conducive to leading an all-time squad of talent.



In The Red Machine, coach Bobrov is charactarized as the antithesis of coach Tarasov. Where the latter emphasized teamwork, sacrifice, hardwork, discipline, conditioning and training, the former came in and emphasized individual talent, game plans revolving around strengths and letting player skills be developed and supported. Coach Bobrov took over Spartak in the mid-60s and immediately made the franchise a contender, finishing twice to the mighty Red Army team before knocking off the star-laden Army team in the 1967 Soviet championships. With that, he was promoted to coach the national soccer team, brought back into hockey following the dismissal of Tarasov and Chernyshov from the national team for political reasons (having to do with money paid to the team for exhibition matches against Japan, contrary to communist party orders - Bobrov himself would leave coaching after pissing off a communist official who barged into his dressing room before the third period of the 1974 worldh championship final, and Bobrov told him to get out, the team went on to win the game, and Bobrov suddenly stopped coaching).

Coach Bobrov's style in a nutshell:
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Red Machine, page 114
"... to make the maximum use of the individual style of the players"
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRM, page114
Certain players thrived with the freedom Bobrov gave them. Starshinov, who liked to play an unrestrained physical game, won two league scoring titles in succession under him. "In my books," he said, "Bobrov is number one." The towering Alexander Yakushev played a weaker, confined game for the national team under Tarasov's dictates but, with Bobrov, he found freedom and shone with both Spartak and the national side."
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRM, pg. 124
...explained Yakushev,.."in principle, Bobrov's game plan was to be always on the attack."
MLD 2011 pick Zimin was the 16 year old young star of his generation, making the top Soviet league at an unheard of age, and chose Spartak to play for in part because of Bobrov (p.115).

Quote:
Originally Posted by TRM, pg. 115
Zimin found that Bobrov's relaxed attitude toward the Spartak players allowed them to develop according to their own rhythm. The coach who was to lead the USSR against Team Canada had "a kind heart and his force was in his insight, in his confidence, in his understanding people," observed Zimin. "He never raised his voice without reason. He never held us under subjection." The Spartak victory over Tarasov's team in the 1967 championship was, for Zimin, testimony to the notion that, in addition to the Tarasov way, another coaching style could work."
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRM, pg. 116
He did not understand thew pressing need for the isolation of his players and, on taking over as coach of the national team, he relaxed some of the draconian regulations. He would choose, even in the biggest series of their lives, to allow some Russian players to return home to their families after the games against Canada.
Tretiak was allowed to get married just before the '72 Summit Series, a wedding he wasn't allowed to have when he twice tried before, because of hockey schedule reasons. Tretiak would 17 years later claim the team wasn't prepared enough for the '72 series, but he sure didn't seem to suffer too much in the series in his post-honeymoon Summit Series glory!

In preparing for the Summit Series in the summer of 1972...
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRM, pg. 117
Bobrov had all his men take a few boxing lessons. He brought some new players to the line-up, most noteably three 21-year-olds from the Wings of Soviets. They were Yuri Lebedev, Alexander Bodunov and Vyacheslav Anisin. They would play effectively, and Canadian reporters, quickly picking up on the name of the third, dubbed them "the headache line".
Soviet game plan to pass up ice quickly suffered from slow defensemen and aggressive Canadian forechecking and physical play that wore down the Soviets eventually. Ironically, the Bobrov team that was up by two goals going into the third period of Game 8 of the 1972 Summit Series, suddenly abandoned its coach's philosophy, leading to Canada's comeback victory.


Last edited by VanIslander: 11-06-2011 at 07:10 AM.
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11-06-2011, 06:34 AM
  #44
VanIslander
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coach Dave King



* head coached the NHL Calgary Flames to two divisional titles
* head coached in the Russian SuperLeague
* head coached Canada's Winter Olympics teams in 1984, 1988, 1992
* head coached Canada to gold in 1982 world juniors
* coached three championships at university level, CIAU coach of the year in 1980.
* In 1987 he coached Canada to the gold medal in the Isvestia Cup tournament in Moscow, becoming the first Canadian team to defeat the Soviet national team in U.S.S.R. since the 1972 Summit Series.
* coached the Canadian national team at five IIHF world championships
* the first coach of the expansion Columbus Blue Jackets
* inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame in 1997 and the IIHF Hall of Fame in 2001.

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