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Official Advice for Forwards Thread

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Old
11-02-2011, 01:29 PM
  #1
KevFist
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Official Advice for Forwards Thread

I'm creating general advice for each position threads here to help people out. If you have any tips in general for Forwards, please place in this thread.

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11-08-2011, 02:58 PM
  #2
Rangediddy
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I wouldn't mind some advice on positioning for centermen.

I've only been playing for about 3 years, but picked it up very quickly so I'm a very good skater, mediocre stick handler, good passer and decent shot. I've done ok in the scoring dept (avg ~1.5-2 point/game in Div B/C rec league) but the points mostly come as assists on individual effort goals, or break breakaway/individual goals of my own.

I guess my problem would be knowing where to be in both the offensive and defensive zones. I find myself often trying to cover a man who's already being covered, or finding open ice close to the net where my winger already is when we have possession.

I like going to the net and battling there, but it seems like anytime I go there, a winger is already battling and I'm just in his way.

Any advice for someone who's never been coached in any way?

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11-08-2011, 03:59 PM
  #3
wahsnairb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rangediddy View Post
I wouldn't mind some advice on positioning for centermen.

I've only been playing for about 3 years, but picked it up very quickly so I'm a very good skater, mediocre stick handler, good passer and decent shot. I've done ok in the scoring dept (avg ~1.5-2 point/game in Div B/C rec league) but the points mostly come as assists on individual effort goals, or break breakaway/individual goals of my own.

I guess my problem would be knowing where to be in both the offensive and defensive zones. I find myself often trying to cover a man who's already being covered, or finding open ice close to the net where my winger already is when we have possession.

I like going to the net and battling there, but it seems like anytime I go there, a winger is already battling and I'm just in his way.

Any advice for someone who's never been coached in any way?
your winger should not be pinching down and covering someone in front of the net, but instead should be out blocking passing lanes and shot lanes from the point. your job as a center is to take away the slot, no matter who is in there.

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11-08-2011, 04:30 PM
  #4
Dan Barr
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He's talking about the offensive zone.

OP, find the open ice. If your two other forwards are in front of the net and along the boards, go to the high slot.

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11-08-2011, 04:33 PM
  #5
Jarick
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Defensive zone, you want to watch anybody in the slot who isn't covered, or if the puck goes into the corner support the defenseman battling for it.

Offensive zone, find some open space and move around. If someone's already in front of the net, get to the boards, or behind the net, or in the corner, or high slot, basically give another pass option.

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11-08-2011, 05:00 PM
  #6
wahsnairb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan Barr View Post
He's talking about the offensive zone.

OP, find the open ice. If your two other forwards are in front of the net and along the boards, go to the high slot.
he said in both zones he had just mentioned covering guys who already seemed covered, but to clarify my post.. my advice is for your defensive zone.

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Old
11-15-2011, 12:11 PM
  #7
HowToHockey
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I have a full article that is a bit long to copy and paste here but I will sum up the general tips

A wingers duties and positioning in the defensive zone

The defensive zone is your teams end of the ice (the side where your goalie is in net) When you are playing in the defensive zone your team is trying to get the puck out (break out) and get into the offensive zone (the other teams end of the ice). When you are in the defensive zone you should generally stay between the blue line and the hash marks. You want to stay in that area for a few reasons:
  • To stop the other teams defensemen from getting the puck and getting a shot on your goalie.
  • To get a break out pass from your own team member
  • To block shots or passes if the other teams defensemen does have the puck.
  • To intercept passes and break out.

A wingers duties in the offensive zone

When you are in the offensive zone your team is trying to score a goal. You will mainly play in the corner, inside the circle, and in front of the net. When the puck goes into your corner it is your job to get it out. If the puck is in your corner you have a few options, the most common and usually the best options are.
  • Carry the puck out and get a shot on net (your centermen or other winger should be there for a rebound).
  • Look for a man in front of the net and set him up with a pass
  • Look to see if the D is open, if so give them the puck.
  • Carry the puck up the boards a bit and cycle it back. Cycling the puck may be a bit advanced, so we will cover that in another article

Wingers duties in the Neutral Zone

Typically in the neutral zone you are either breaking out, or back checking. If you are on the attack you make hard passes through the neutral zone and feed the head man. This means if you get the puck out of your end you should be looking for a streaking centermen or your other winger. If there are no options try to break into their end, and if that is not an option just cross the red line and dump the puck in (then chase it, or get a line change). If your team mate has the puck and you are breaking out skate for open ice and try to get that lead pass.

If the other team has the puck in the neutral zone you are playing defense. You should be hustling to get back into position and get the puck from them / cause a turnover. Keep an eye on who has the puck, and where they might be skating to or who they might be passing to. If you see a potential passing lane try to block it.

I like to always think of the ice as lanes, lanes for them to skate and lanes for them to pass. I am always looking at the guy with the puck and thinking “what are his lanes, what are his options” I try to get in their lanes and take away options.

Full article is here responsibilities of a winger in hockey

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Old
11-15-2011, 12:18 PM
  #8
HowToHockey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rangediddy View Post
I wouldn't mind some advice on positioning for centermen.

I've only been playing for about 3 years, but picked it up very quickly so I'm a very good skater, mediocre stick handler, good passer and decent shot. I've done ok in the scoring dept (avg ~1.5-2 point/game in Div B/C rec league) but the points mostly come as assists on individual effort goals, or break breakaway/individual goals of my own.

I guess my problem would be knowing where to be in both the offensive and defensive zones. I find myself often trying to cover a man who's already being covered, or finding open ice close to the net where my winger already is when we have possession.

I like going to the net and battling there, but it seems like anytime I go there, a winger is already battling and I'm just in his way.

Any advice for someone who's never been coached in any way?
The centremen is a support man, that means you help your wingers out, if they don't need help you get open for a pass.

Defensive zone
You can help your d-men get possesion in the corners, then pass to your wingers for a break out. If your d-men have the puck read the play, you can go to the neutral zone and cross lanes to get a pass, or just join a breakout if your winger will get the puck.

Offensive Zone
You are either digging in the corners with your wingers (if it's a 2-1 it should be 2 on 2 so get in there and help out) or you are giving your winger another option for the pass. This means your winger is in the goalies face, and you are high-slot or vice versa. You could also head behind the net if your winger likes to cycle the puck.

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Old
11-16-2011, 08:01 PM
  #9
HighwayToHelm
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Just some basic guidelines
-When you have the puck attack with speed (harder to defend)
-Headman the puck to teammates when open
-Make a point of staying onside on the rush
-Shoot when in the slot unless a pass is clearly open (rarely beneficial to stick handle in further)
-Back check at full speed ( cover the most available player)
-Keep shifts from 45s to a minute (get the puck in deep and change when tired)
-Move away from the net when your teammates have the puck behind the net (frees up space for you and your teammate)
-Crash the net when the puck is shot a the goalie ( keep you stick on the ice for rebounds)

obviously hockey is always changing and no rules are stet in stone but following these guidelines should help

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Old
12-20-2011, 06:38 AM
  #10
RAYClovis
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What're the best course of action to do as a wingers off the faceoff?

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Old
12-20-2011, 11:52 AM
  #11
ArrogantOwl
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That sounds more of a case-by-case basis but I'm sure there are some dry-cut guides out there as I was looking for some info for this myself.

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Old
12-20-2011, 08:17 PM
  #12
Royal Canuck
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So it's my first year playing forward since I was six, (I played goalie for 10 years) and I play a two-way game as both a center or a winger. I'm only playing midget house, but i'm averaging around 2 points a game right now, but my one flaw is positioning in my defensive end. I play fine on the P.K. because i get the box concept as well as the triangle for 5 on 3. It's just I find myself chasing the puck sometimes instead of staying towards the boards waiting for a breakout pass (as a winger) and I was wondering if anyone had advice as to how I can stop this bad habit.

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Old
12-20-2011, 08:27 PM
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ArrogantOwl
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You could do as my old Lax coach did and tied our players to ropes limiting the distance you can go until you play in the proper area, or, you could be more aware of your positioning. Coming from a Goalie it sounds like your used to following the puck so it is natural for you to chase it.

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12-20-2011, 09:34 PM
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12-22-2011, 03:51 AM
  #15
Kritter471
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Okay, so I play in our lowest level adult league where we all suck to varying degrees of ineptitude. And I feel like, in general, I have a very good grasp of where I'm supposed to be postionally, though doing what I'm supposed to once there is sketchy at best.

But as we all suck, there is a lot of firewagon hockey going on, and I feel like I end up covering blank space in our defensive zone. One of two scenarios is common, and I'd like advice on both.

In the first, all five opposing players are in my team's zone, but there is only one point man back because the other D is pinching way down and no one has rotated back to replace him. This is very, very common, and when it happens, there are almost always two forwards up high covering the one point man. I know that can't be right, since the whole general hockey defense is a matchup zone concept (always a body on a body with responsibility to an area if someone is over there). How far can I drop into the zone in that case, knowing I have to keep an eye on the point in case someone wises up and rotates back?

The second scenario is the opposite - there are four opposing players in my team's zone and one opposing D essentially playing safety at the center red line. I am not a breakaway threat, so I feel stupid circling around neutral looking for a long breakout, but I also feel like I'm basically covering space and not helping out if I hang out in the open point, with the one upside that I'm available for a battle on that wall or a breakout pass.

Now, I assume this is basically a byproduct of really terrible tactics in rec league. But any advice on the best way to play them?

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Old
12-27-2011, 03:07 PM
  #16
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D-zone positioning

Simply, the center should be between the puck and the net cheating slightly toward the puck carrier. You will find this will always put you in good position for the breakout as well.

Kritter471 - If a D-man has cheated in on your side you do need to pick him up. Just be aware that at some point someone will rotate back and he is your responsibility.

If a D-man is playing extra deep in the neutral zone, be aware he may enter the zone late, but there is no need to "cover" him if he stays out there. If your team is smart, break out to his side and you should have an easy exit out of your zone. Lucky you, you can play the boards high without worrying about a pinching defenseman and take the time to make a great breakout pass.

Good luck!

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Old
01-02-2012, 05:44 PM
  #17
Holyhell
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As a forward myself I think the most annoying thing yourself or a teammate can do, is make an east to west move right along the blueline when you are breaking into the offensive zone.

My tips:

If you are playing dump and chase hockey, dump it in right after the centre ice line, not right before you enter the zone. Easier for your forwards to gain speed going into the offensive zone and to have a jump on the defence.

And if you are carrying the puck into the offensive zone, don't stop until you make it past the blue line for the love of god. I cannot reiterate this enough, moves at the blue line will be an offside most of the time. Especially if your teammates aren't aware that you want to do this.

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Old
01-11-2012, 05:27 AM
  #18
Kritter471
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Thought this was a great read on the basics of how to play wing in the D-zone from Justin Bourne.

http://blogs.thescore.com/nhl/2012/0...an-i-ever-did/

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