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Old
11-09-2011, 12:32 PM
  #26
Jarick
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If I was an NHL'er, damn right I'd be using super light weight sticks that last a couple games. We all complain about how soft the Easton blades are and they break apart, but who cares about the blade stiffness when the shaft is going to snap after a couple games anyways?

I would be more interested to hear if minor league teams make their players use more durable models of sticks, i.e. they can't get the super light weaves and have to have them kevlar wrapped or whatever.

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11-09-2011, 12:57 PM
  #27
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Originally Posted by r3cc0s View Post
well intrestingly... my neighbor has a TotalOne which is actually a One95 - just a different paint job

its like anything and especially if you are sponsored, you'll get what you want, but generally I think that pro-stocks are less durable...
Cammillari went through 70 sticks last season... and I'm sure they're on the ice probably close to 300+ times a year, that's still remarkable concidering he's not a 220+ beast and doesn't take big slappers. I think pro stocks are more brittle, and often the blades have various weaves for various reasons... (my buddy's has two weaves on the blade of his one95 repaint of a totalOne)
the one95 and the total are not the same stick, different featres and the total one has a completely different feel

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11-09-2011, 01:54 PM
  #28
robmneilson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
My current stick is a Vapor X60 which cost me $175 and I've used it for maybe 40 games so far, which is $4 per game and dropping.
Love the X:60, but I'm on my third one now. The blades of the last two both cracked in half. Id almost rather have the shaft explode so I would know its done. The last two I noticed my stick feeling a bit strange on shots and passes...but I still played the whole game with it. Discovered the blade cracked in half when I removed the tape.

Still though, those sticks lasted me 50-60 games at least.

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11-09-2011, 02:15 PM
  #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
If I was an NHL'er, damn right I'd be using super light weight sticks that last a couple games. We all complain about how soft the Easton blades are and they break apart, but who cares about the blade stiffness when the shaft is going to snap after a couple games anyways?

I would be more interested to hear if minor league teams make their players use more durable models of sticks, i.e. they can't get the super light weaves and have to have them kevlar wrapped or whatever.
You see a much higher number of 'cheaper' sticks at the lower levels - i.e., SE16s and Easton STs that have a higher durability and a lower cost. So, there ya have it.

-----

Very, very often at high levels they repaint sticks to the 'newest' model so the players can advertise that stick, regardless of what they're really using. You see a lot of a SE16s in S19 dress, as well as S19s/SE16s in RS Stealth dress... One95's painted like TotalOnes... Warrior Dolomites painted to be Widows... The list goes on.

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11-09-2011, 02:37 PM
  #30
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One interesting comment:


Quote:
Colton Gillies, the youngest member of the Minnesota Wild, has had trouble all year trying to find a stick that works. In junior hockey, his team budget was considerably smaller, and the team provided only stiff sticks so that the players wouldn’t break them. But in the NHL, where the budgets and resources are substantially higher, young players need to spend a lot more time trying out a variety of sticks. Before practices, Gillies takes loads of shots as he simultaneously works on his puck skills and stick selection.

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11-09-2011, 05:10 PM
  #31
santiclaws
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Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
Pretty sure that his junior club was just being boneheaded - there's no evidence that different flex sticks break at different rates. If anything, it would be the stiffer sticks which would break more often since they are less flexible and thus more likely to break if the same amount of torque is applied as that applied to a more flexible stick.

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11-09-2011, 06:01 PM
  #32
ponder
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cowbell232 View Post
The difference between pro-stock and retail sticks are real. I've had both pro-stock and retail S19s and TotalOnes.

Pro-stock S19s, according to a postage meter (Hey, it's an accurate digital scale!) are roughly 5-grams or so lighter then retail and it was also a bit longer (about 1/2"). The pro-stock also didn't have the same coating around the taper to the blade as the retail. I assume that had something to with the weight difference... Otherwise they felt identical in play and everything. However, the retail sticks did last a LOT longer then pro-stock in terms of feel. I think a brand new pro-stock probably feels better at the taper when stick handling, but after a bit of play they are pretty much the same.

Pro-stock and retail TotalOnes had the same weight, same coating, same everything. Virtually identical in every facet. Much happier with the retail quality of the TotalOne compared to the retail quality of the S19 - then again, the same could be said about any S19 v TotalOne IMHO.

I just got a retail RS Stealth last week and have played with it once. It's a very good stick, but I'm not 100% happy with it yet. I don't want to pass judgement until I get some more ice time with it though.
Pro-stock equipment (and this goes for all equipment, not just sticks) is not "better," it's just customized for a specific player. If you randomly picked out 5 TotalOnes from an NHL lockerroom there's a good chance you'd be looking at some pretty different sticks that are just painted the same way. The pros can chose from a wide range of custom flex profiles, a wider range of flexes in general, their choice of carbon weaves, custom curves, their choice of blade stiffness/construction, exactly how much weight they want to sacrifice for durability in general, a range of shaft dimensions, etc. It's not like they get super special technology that companies hide from the retail market, they just get a stick that's really customized to their preferences. If anything it's often the case that they're using OLDER technology, a lot of pro-stock S19s for example are actually pro-stock/customized versions of SE16s, with an S19 paintjob.

You can't, for example, make a general statement about pro-stock TotalOnes, because they're all so different, some could be very similar to the retail that they're painted like, some could be very different from said retail model. Whether you like any individual pro stock stick more or less than the retail model is totally dependent on personal preference, and the particular pro stock stick you're using.

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Old
11-09-2011, 08:43 PM
  #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by santiclaws View Post
Pretty sure that his junior club was just being boneheaded - there's no evidence that different flex sticks break at different rates. If anything, it would be the stiffer sticks which would break more often since they are less flexible and thus more likely to break if the same amount of torque is applied as that applied to a more flexible stick.
you logic is flawed with that last part of your statement

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Old
11-10-2011, 10:14 AM
  #34
r3cc0s
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Originally Posted by hyster110 View Post
you logic is flawed with that last part of your statement
the Show is a totally different story than the CHL, CIS, NCAA, heck even the AHL from what I understand...

Alot of the teams in Junior B, A have independant contracts or sponsors such as Sherwood, and CCM
but from what I know of, their equipment is pretty much off the retail shelves (outside of team colors, stiched numbers/names) including sticks.

Same goes with CIS from what I've heard as well

CHL I think has to use "preferd vendor partner" equipment such as CCM, RBK

From what I understand from my neighbor, AHL also limits its players to use prefered vendors and predominately uses RBK/CCM for things like helmets, pant covers, and ... I think gloves... but there were some stipulations as to what partner/vendors are allowed according to him
That being said, the RBK sticks used in the AHL are pro-stock

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11-10-2011, 10:19 AM
  #35
hyster110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r3cc0s View Post
the Show is a totally different story than the CHL, CIS, NCAA, heck even the AHL from what I understand...

Alot of the teams in Junior B, A have independant contracts or sponsors such as Sherwood, and CCM
but from what I know of, their equipment is pretty much off the retail shelves (outside of team colors, stiched numbers/names) including sticks.

Same goes with CIS from what I've heard as well

CHL I think has to use "preferd vendor partner" equipment such as CCM, RBK

From what I understand from my neighbor, AHL also limits its players to use prefered vendors and predominately uses RBK/CCM for things like helmets, pant covers, and ... I think gloves... but there were some stipulations as to what partner/vendors are allowed according to him
That being said, the RBK sticks used in the AHL are pro-stock
as having worked for a CIS team, for the most part they are retail sticks, with some exceptions. since our team dealt with a equipment Rep, we were able to get extras like extra stiff sticks and one guy even got his own custom curve delivered

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11-10-2011, 10:54 AM
  #36
madmutter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
If I was an NHL'er, damn right I'd be using super light weight sticks that last a couple games. We all complain about how soft the Easton blades are and they break apart, but who cares about the blade stiffness when the shaft is going to snap after a couple games anyways?

I would be more interested to hear if minor league teams make their players use more durable models of sticks, i.e. they can't get the super light weaves and have to have them kevlar wrapped or whatever.
I was on the bench for an Oil Kings (WHL) game during warmups and nearly all the sticks were Easton ST's with a few SE16's. It was a couple years ago and the SE16 was the top end at the time. I've also been to the Oilers locker room sale and the Oil Kings had a section there and the sticks were just unused retail stuff, some of it even 2 piece. The Oiler sticks however are just like it's been stated before in this thread, pro stocks that may or may not bear a resemblance to the retail stick they are painted to look like.

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Old
11-10-2011, 11:41 AM
  #37
CGNY87
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Shop around. A few months ago I got a Vapor x60 for 150, because they were making room for the x6.0 and apx.

My order of spending goes:
Skates
Stick
Gloves
Helmet (i always buy the best helmet it just happens to be less than I spend on my sticks)
Pants
Shoulder
Shin guards
Elbow

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11-10-2011, 11:42 AM
  #38
Wilch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by madmutter View Post
I was on the bench for an Oil Kings (WHL) game during warmups and nearly all the sticks were Easton ST's with a few SE16's. It was a couple years ago and the SE16 was the top end at the time. I've also been to the Oilers locker room sale and the Oil Kings had a section there and the sticks were just unused retail stuff, some of it even 2 piece. The Oiler sticks however are just like it's been stated before in this thread, pro stocks that may or may not bear a resemblance to the retail stick they are painted to look like.
Now those are the sticks you want to get if you don't want to spend a ton of money replacing your players' sticks.

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11-10-2011, 04:38 PM
  #39
r3cc0s
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Originally Posted by Wilch View Post
Now those are the sticks you want to get if you don't want to spend a ton of money replacing your players' sticks.
Great sticks where I've seen from $79 - $129 are:

U+ Pro
Easton ST
Easton S17
Easton SE16
Bauer One95
Bauer XXXX
Warrior Dolomite
Warrior AK27 (I've seen shafts for $60!)
Sherwood T90

All were top end and I think... the ST, XXXX, T90, Dolomite are very simular to the latest ones that were produced

I personally like the Bauer XXXX and the Eastons... I think the XXXX was almost as good as the X60

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11-10-2011, 08:47 PM
  #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r3cc0s View Post
Great sticks where I've seen from $79 - $129 are:

U+ Pro
Easton ST
Easton S17
Easton SE16
Bauer One95
Bauer XXXX
Warrior Dolomite
Warrior AK27 (I've seen shafts for $60!)
Sherwood T90

All were top end and I think... the ST, XXXX, T90, Dolomite are very simular to the latest ones that were produced

I personally like the Bauer XXXX and the Eastons... I think the XXXX was almost as good as the X60
Yep. I got both the Dolomite and ST. ST being my backup in case my Dolomite snaps.

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Old
11-10-2011, 09:27 PM
  #41
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I SAVE money by using mid-upper ranged sticks. Wood sticks break down and turn to mush long before they break for me. I play alot of hockey and in the last 5 years I've had 4 sticks that I played the vast majority of the time with. The very top end sticks sacrifice durability for the extra lightness. It's up to you when that price becomes worth it but for me composite sticks are a FAR better value. I paid $100 a piece for 2 Sherwood Rythm 19's with a pro-stock curve, they're starting season 3 with lots of battle scars but still performing like they're new.

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11-10-2011, 11:06 PM
  #42
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Originally Posted by Stealthmode16 View Post
I SAVE money by using mid-upper ranged sticks. Wood sticks break down and turn to mush long before they break for me. I play alot of hockey and in the last 5 years I've had 4 sticks that I played the vast majority of the time with. The very top end sticks sacrifice durability for the extra lightness. It's up to you when that price becomes worth it but for me composite sticks are a FAR better value. I paid $100 a piece for 2 Sherwood Rythm 19's with a pro-stock curve, they're starting season 3 with lots of battle scars but still performing like they're new.
I have the RM19 pro stock with a sakic curve... i just don't like how its almost a 6 deg lie tis all for the one I bought... also the blade doesn't feel as nice as the nicer newer sticks, though the RM19 4-5 years back was a top of the line.

the RM19 glove is awesome... its the same as the 9950 and almost the same as the T90/100

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11-11-2011, 08:53 PM
  #43
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damn it seems like we are all cut from the same mold...i started with "low-end" compo's in the 40-60 range but have since gone to the higher end year olds but have yet to spend more that $100 on a stick...my latest is the OPS AK which i think is my favorite stick i have ever used... in 5 years of playing with compo's i have broken 3 and bought a total of 8 sticks...i play quite a bit (2-3 times a week) sometimes less and most those sticks have taken a beating but are still holding up so i feel like its money WELL spent

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11-11-2011, 09:05 PM
  #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r3cc0s View Post
well intrestingly... my neighbor has a TotalOne which is actually a One95 - just a different paint job

its like anything and especially if you are sponsored, you'll get what you want, but generally I think that pro-stocks are less durable...
Cammillari went through 70 sticks last season... and I'm sure they're on the ice probably close to 300+ times a year, that's still remarkable concidering he's not a 220+ beast and doesn't take big slappers. I think pro stocks are more brittle, and often the blades have various weaves for various reasons... (my buddy's has two weaves on the blade of his one95 repaint of a totalOne)
The number is remarkable in how low it is. Most pros go though 100+.

A big part of the reason is that pros replace their sticks after they take a healthy whack, even if it looks and feels sound. You just can't tell for sure, so those sticks get relegated to practice or are autographed and given away/sold off. That's just something they do to try and ensure that their sticks are as damage free (and thus less likely to break) during a game.

Wood sticks? Players would swap em out every period, at least. They lose their pop really quickly when you have shots like NHLers do. Composites really are more durable, but meet much more spectacular ends. When a wood stick dies, it usually stays in one piece. A composite is virtually as good as new until it explodes.

\Currently using an SE 16 and a Vapor XXXX, both of which were below half price- one pro stock, one in good condition at a play it again (it's also a pro stock, but I didn't buy it new as one)

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Old
11-12-2011, 12:49 AM
  #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarick View Post
The only composite I broke lasted me 15-20 games and was a super light demo model. Even if I paid $150 for it, that's $8-10 per game.

The last wood stick I ever bought snapped in half the first time I used it. Paid $30 for it, so that's $30 per ice time. Previously I had an Easton wood stick I paid $30 for and the blade went soft after four skates, which was $7.50 per game.

My current stick is a Vapor X60 which cost me $175 and I've used it for maybe 40 games so far, which is $4 per game and dropping.
I love my X60. I got my first one free, and it lasted me probably around 50-60 skates. I ended up finding my identical X60 for $150 last week, after I broke my first one. Unreal stick.

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11-16-2011, 03:37 PM
  #46
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I pay $20-30 per blade for my aluminum shaft and, unless it breaks, replace it every 1.5-2 years or so.

I made the transition to a composite and broke it during warmups after not even using it 10 times. That was all I needed to not want one anymore. I found a used aluminum shaft for $15 w/a decent blade on it and picked up a multi-laminate one-piece for under $10.

The composite stick didn't allow me to do more than I ever did w/my old school sticks, and the heavy multi-lam doesn't hold me back any. As long as it feels good in my hands, I'm all set.

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11-27-2011, 10:39 PM
  #47
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$30 to $40 plus tax in the winter - maybe a bit more if i need a stick and it's summer. Can't justify spending more as it wouldn't make much of a difference with my shot (plus marriage and home ownership and my ability to already waste enough money on stuff I really don't need on my limited paycheck)

Can usually find some on sale - currently using a Rebellion Silver Shadow and a Vic Crossfire. Especially like the Rebellion one. The Vic one has been good but has a bit more curve than I ideally would like.

Just picked up a pair of Graf by Busch G-force sticks this past week for $30 each - haven't used them yet. Though I didn't reallly need them I couldn't pass them up at that price and both have the same small curve I like with out any weird toe or heel angling.

Just playing 'scrub' aka 'pickup' hockey twice a week now, but didn't ever spend over $50 even when back when I was playing beer league a few years ago.

I was a late hold out on using composite sticks and might still be using a wood if the selection of wood sticks hadn't become so limited.

The wood sticks I used to use would usually eventually turn too mushy to continue using more often than breaking. The better cheaper priced composites I have used usually break eventually but last quite a while, but have had certain ones last only a few games and other quickly started chipping off at the end of the blade and soon became unusable - didn't buy those brands again.

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11-27-2011, 11:34 PM
  #48
r3cc0s
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greyraven8 View Post
$30 to $40 plus tax in the winter - maybe a bit more if i need a stick and it's summer. Can't justify spending more as it wouldn't make much of a difference with my shot (plus marriage and home ownership and my ability to already waste enough money on stuff I really don't need on my limited paycheck)

Can usually find some on sale - currently using a Rebellion Silver Shadow and a Vic Crossfire. Especially like the Rebellion one. The Vic one has been good but has a bit more curve than I ideally would like.

Just picked up a pair of Graf by Busch G-force sticks this past week for $30 each - haven't used them yet. Though I didn't reallly need them I couldn't pass them up at that price and both have the same small curve I like with out any weird toe or heel angling.

Just playing 'scrub' aka 'pickup' hockey twice a week now, but didn't ever spend over $50 even when back when I was playing beer league a few years ago.

I was a late hold out on using composite sticks and might still be using a wood if the selection of wood sticks hadn't become so limited.

The wood sticks I used to use would usually eventually turn too mushy to continue using more often than breaking. The better cheaper priced composites I have used usually break eventually but last quite a while, but have had certain ones last only a few games and other quickly started chipping off at the end of the blade and soon became unusable - didn't buy those brands again.
its a tough call..

IMO a good wood stick, i.e. 9950 Sherwood is better than a Vic fiberglass composite

I don't spend much time with very "low" end sticks, but I can tell you that a couple vic's i've borrowed on the pond had almost 0 feel and was terrible...
No specific kick point, limp like a wet noodle, and no feel...

IF you don't take slappers or too hard of snapper (i.e. playing pickup or super low level men's league)... a pair of wood sticks would be better than a couple crappy Vic's

however, spent like $60+ a twig on a couple season mid-> high range stick... and thats money well worth spent

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11-28-2011, 08:51 AM
  #49
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I play men's league now after a 15 year post college layoff. I initially had the "I'm not going to pay over $80 for a stick" mentality. I was using $80 Easton S7's and picked up an Easton S15 on a deal and simply can't go back. I can do everything better with it.

I just grabbed an S15 Heatley for $108 shipped. For me to pay $240 for an RS would be a waste IMO, but that's just me.

At the end of the day this is your hobby. If you have the $$ what better to spend it on? I'm an everyday joe so I look for deals and keep it to the ~$100-$120 price point. The sticks at that level are plenty light and perform as well as my intermediate skills can exploit

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11-28-2011, 01:36 PM
  #50
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Never liked the feel of the Sherwood wood sticks - prefered Titan or Koho when I used only wood. Tried Branches wood sticks many, many years ago; beautiful looking stick that some other guys I knew liked a lot, but they were just too stiff for me. You can usually count on the Sherwood wood stick being in most hockey stores, but not too many choices for wood you can count on beyond that.

Vic is not my favourite of the cheap ones - Rebellion as well as having a curve i like has a better feel, but Vic is alright for me (don't get me started on how crappy the low end CCM Vector ones are). It's rare I take anything resembling a slap shot and do a lot more checking and passing than shooting. I try to stop the guys with the good hard shots and fancy moves; I sure the hell aint one of them.


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