HFBoards

Go Back   HFBoards > General Hockey Discussion > The Rink
Mobile Hockey's Future Become a Sponsor Site Rules Support Forum vBookie Page 2
The Rink For the not so ready for prime-time players, coaches, referees, and the people that have to live with them. Discuss experiences in local leagues, coaching tips, equipment, and training.

One footed hockey stop (T-Stop) on outside edge?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old
11-17-2011, 10:19 PM
  #1
night-timer
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 154
vCash: 500
One footed hockey stop (T-Stop) on outside edge?

What's the key to a good T-Stop, the type of stop players do when they return to the bench? (Figure skaters call it a T-Stop.)

Outside edges have always been my weak point. My backwards crossovers suffer badly for it. Unless I practice-and-practice them, I lose the ability to do them if I take a break from hockey.

That makes me think I may not be doing them properly in the first place.

Balance, leg strength and incorrect posture could be the real issues I'm struggling with here, apart from not trusting myself on my outside edges in general.

night-timer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2011, 10:26 PM
  #2
Ribosome
Registered User
 
Ribosome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Boston
Country: United States
Posts: 236
vCash: 500
You already said it.

Stand up and put your left foot pointing sideways. Then put the middle of your right foot to your heel. You've made a T. Now bend your knee, lean back and imagine digging in and cutting ice with that right foot. The left foot is mostly just for stability (ie holds the right foot a bit, or you can swing it out if you're falling backwards)

^-- that's if you're a righty. If you're a lefty then switch it up. I'm a righty so my right foot is stronger and more coordinated, which I suggest you start off with.

Ribosome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2011, 10:31 PM
  #3
Ribosome
Registered User
 
Ribosome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Boston
Country: United States
Posts: 236
vCash: 500
To add to the last post:

Once you become good at it, you will be able to incorporate it into your game. For example, what I posted above is fine for strolling into the bench and looking cool. But it's not really practical for changing the direction you're skating in.

The only way I can explain how to do a one footed hockey stop so you can change direction fast is to just do a regular hockey stop but lift that opposite foot and put as much pressure on the stationary foot as much as possible. Do that until you figure it out. That's how they taught us as kids anyway.

Ribosome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-17-2011, 10:40 PM
  #4
kr580
Registered User
 
kr580's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 1,258
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to kr580
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S8CWdQyYxzc

There's a basic demonstration of a T-stop. You're going to want to try it on your strong stopping side first. When you're learning keep ALL the weight on the front foot that's gliding forward. Bring the back foot down as you're comfortable. Make sure you LEAN BACK a bit more and more each time and get that outside edge on the ice so it grinds to a halt. Bend your knees. Arms out for extra balance. Keep putting more and more weight on the back foot each time during the stop and eventually you'll be able and confident enough to lift that front foot up completely.

It's tricky to get comfortable with it because you rely on such an unstable part of your body. Keep at it and you'll get comfortable soon enough.

kr580 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2011, 02:50 AM
  #5
romdj
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Brussels
Country: Belgium
Posts: 20
vCash: 500
this is simple, but god i think it's cool ^^

romdj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2011, 03:17 AM
  #6
kr580
Registered User
 
kr580's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 1,258
vCash: 500
Send a message via AIM to kr580
Quote:
Originally Posted by romdj View Post
this is simple, but god i think it's cool ^^
I ice guard at my local rink and I almost exclusively use the t-stop to stop now. For some odd reason it's really fun.

kr580 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old
11-18-2011, 08:51 AM
  #7
rinkrat22
Registered User
 
rinkrat22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Chicago
Country: United States
Posts: 575
vCash: 500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ribosome View Post
To add to the last post:

Once you become good at it, you will be able to incorporate it into your game. For example, what I posted above is fine for strolling into the bench and looking cool. But it's not really practical for changing the direction you're skating in.
The only way I can explain how to do a one footed hockey stop so you can change direction fast is to just do a regular hockey stop but lift that opposite foot and put as much pressure on the stationary foot as much as possible. Do that until you figure it out. That's how they taught us as kids anyway.
I disagree, the use of all four of your skate edges at any time is extremely important, especially in the defensive zone. If you are defending the puck carrier you must be able to change directions even in mid stride if they change direction.

rinkrat22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Forum Jump


Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:11 AM.

monitoring_string = "e4251c93e2ba248d29da988d93bf5144"
Contact Us - HFBoards - Archive - Privacy Statement - Terms of Use - Advertise - Top - AdChoices

vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
HFBoards.com is a property of CraveOnline Media, LLC, an Evolve Media, LLC company. 2014 All Rights Reserved.