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Mouthguard made by dentist and braces

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Old
12-01-2011, 01:53 PM
  #1
bp spec
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Mouthguard made by dentist and braces

Can you use a mouthguard if you have braces?

EDIT: I only want answers about mouthguards made by the dentist.


Last edited by bp spec: 12-02-2011 at 08:43 AM. Reason: Clarifying the topic
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12-01-2011, 01:57 PM
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takehisheadoff
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Yeah. I never had braces but played with guys who did. I never used a full mouth guard though I chopped the ends off so when the ref seen me he seen it on my few front teeth. If it does feel unconfortable just do that. Are you wearing a cage with this mouthguard?

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12-01-2011, 01:59 PM
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Stickmata
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They make mouthguards specifically for braces. My son wore one while he was in braces.

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12-01-2011, 02:22 PM
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bp spec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickmata View Post
They make mouthguards specifically for braces. My son wore one while he was in braces.
Do you have to see the dentist and mold one?

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12-01-2011, 02:24 PM
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bp spec
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Originally Posted by takehisheadoff View Post
Yeah. I never had braces but played with guys who did. I never used a full mouth guard though I chopped the ends off so when the ref seen me he seen it on my few front teeth. If it does feel unconfortable just do that. Are you wearing a cage with this mouthguard?
A shield

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12-01-2011, 02:30 PM
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Dont Hinder Jinder
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when i had braces, i moulded my own the old fashion way
water + boil
You just have to press it down on your braces, and let it set for a bit longer

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12-01-2011, 02:34 PM
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Lehner
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bp spec View Post
Do you have to see the dentist and mold one?
It worth the price, A mouthguard by a dentist is a million times better then doing it yourself.

It costs like 50$ to do, almost the same as buying a high end mouth guard.

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12-01-2011, 02:36 PM
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bp spec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Marchands Nose View Post
when i had braces, i moulded my own the old fashion way
water + boil
You just have to press it down on your braces, and let it set for a bit longer
Okey, but I want to make one at the dentist

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12-01-2011, 02:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lehner View Post
It worth the price, A mouthguard by a dentist is a million times better then doing it yourself.

It costs like 50$ to do, almost the same as buying a high end mouth guard.
Cost like 222$+ in Sweden


Last edited by bp spec: 12-02-2011 at 09:28 AM.
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12-01-2011, 05:48 PM
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Stickmata
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bp spec View Post
Do you have to see the dentist and mold one?
I'm talking about the Shock Doctor ones that have space for braces.

Regarding the dentist versus store bought, I have the Shock Doctor Pro (which offers the least protection of any of their mouthpieces) and I've compared it to a teammate's custom dentist-made mouthpiece and there is no way his is more protective, either in terms of coverage or in terms of the cushion between the teeth offered by the Shock Doctor. I think the assumption that you're going to get better protection with a dentist made piece is a fallacy. You may get better fit, but if you follow the directions, you can get the boil and press ones to fit really damn good.

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12-01-2011, 11:26 PM
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macattack22
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I personally played with braces. My ortho gave me a mouth peice that covered both the top and bottom teeth. Thing sucked and my brackets still broke....take the advise from a reply a couple up from this...

by a shock doctor, mold it around the braces...

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12-02-2011, 04:32 AM
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bp spec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickmata View Post
I'm talking about the Shock Doctor ones that have space for braces.

Regarding the dentist versus store bought, I have the Shock Doctor Pro (which offers the least protection of any of their mouthpieces) and I've compared it to a teammate's custom dentist-made mouthpiece and there is no way his is more protective, either in terms of coverage or in terms of the cushion between the teeth offered by the Shock Doctor. I think the assumption that you're going to get better protection with a dentist made piece is a fallacy. You may get better fit, but if you follow the directions, you can get the boil and press ones to fit really damn good.
I can't see how a store bought piece can be better than a piece done by the dentist. At least not in Sweden, maybe our dentists are better than yours?

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12-02-2011, 05:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stickmata View Post
You may get better fit, but if you follow the directions, you can get the boil and press ones to fit really damn good.
I found that waiting a few seconds longer in the water than the directions say. The guard just starts losing it's shape (almost like a wet noodle) and becomes very easy to mold. Then pop it in, suck all the air out of your mouth and press with your lips, cheeks, tongue. Or fingers. Have a cold glass of water ready to cool it and your mouth off when set.

Don't bite very hard or your bottom teeth with just go through it as it's really soft.

Conforms to your teeth and get a great fit.

* Not responsible for ruined guards or burns. Bout the same risk as drinking coffee, just make sure boiling water is off.

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12-02-2011, 08:54 AM
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bp spec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nullterm View Post
I found that waiting a few seconds longer in the water than the directions say. The guard just starts losing it's shape (almost like a wet noodle) and becomes very easy to mold. Then pop it in, suck all the air out of your mouth and press with your lips, cheeks, tongue. Or fingers. Have a cold glass of water ready to cool it and your mouth off when set.

Don't bite very hard or your bottom teeth with just go through it as it's really soft.

Conforms to your teeth and get a great fit.

* Not responsible for ruined guards or burns. Bout the same risk as drinking coffee, just make sure boiling water is off.
Not just referring to your post, but I really want some info about dentist made mouthguards only. I appreciate your answers though. Because it's a rule in Sweden to have a mouthguard made by a dentist. You can get a penalty for illegal equipment if you use a different mouthguard (this never happens) and your insurance is not valid if you get hurt

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12-02-2011, 09:23 AM
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Lehner
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bp spec View Post
I can't see how a store bought piece can be better than a piece done by the dentist. At least not in Sweden, maybe our dentists are better than yours?
A dentist definitely is better fit, but I think he is right, a Shockdoctor I'm sure is made of better material then the dentist type.

I just wonder how much the better material even matters.

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12-02-2011, 09:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lehner View Post
A dentist definitely is better fit, but I think he is right, a Shockdoctor I'm sure is made of better material then the dentist type.

I just wonder how much the better material even matters.
Like I said in my last post, I have to, and want to use a dentist made piece
Don't know nothing about the materials

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12-02-2011, 12:04 PM
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nullterm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bp spec View Post
Not just referring to your post, but I really want some info about dentist made mouthguards only. I appreciate your answers though. Because it's a rule in Sweden to have a mouthguard made by a dentist. You can get a penalty for illegal equipment if you use a different mouthguard (this never happens) and your insurance is not valid if you get hurt
No penalty, but no insurance without a mouthguard.

Also, here in Canada I think insurance covers a dentist made mouthguard. I think it's probably cheaper for the insurance company to pay for a ton of mouthguards rather than pay for those that need dental work.

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12-02-2011, 02:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nullterm View Post
No penalty, but no insurance without a mouthguard.

Also, here in Canada I think insurance covers a dentist made mouthguard. I think it's probably cheaper for the insurance company to pay for a ton of mouthguards rather than pay for those that need dental work.
Wrong

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12-02-2011, 02:08 PM
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what sort of information are you looking for exactly? it seems like you only want info for mouthguards made by a dentist. they work well, they mold to your teeth perfectly, they're easier to talk/breathe with when you're wearing them, they can definitely be made to work with braces, and apparently in sweden they cost $200+

What more are you looking for?

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12-02-2011, 02:35 PM
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bp spec
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Double post


Last edited by bp spec: 12-02-2011 at 02:42 PM.
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12-02-2011, 02:41 PM
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bp spec
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Originally Posted by mbowman View Post
what sort of information are you looking for exactly? it seems like you only want info for mouthguards made by a dentist. they work well, they mold to your teeth perfectly, they're easier to talk/breathe with when you're wearing them, they can definitely be made to work with braces, and apparently in sweden they cost $200+

What more are you looking for?
Thank you, that was about all I needed. My worries were that I would need to play with a cage for an extra year, instead of playing with a shield. Perhaps a review from somebody who have used the sort of mouthguard I'm talking about. Maybe I explained what I wanted to know crappy.


Last edited by bp spec: 12-03-2011 at 06:54 AM.
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12-02-2011, 03:18 PM
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nullterm
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Originally Posted by bp spec View Post
Wrong
No, right.

I meant here in men's league. Page 18. "Recommended." You forfeit insurance coverage from the league for any dental damage if not wearing a mouth guard. Half of the guys on the ice don't wear mouth guards.

http://www.icesports.com/PDF/ASHL%20...ok_2011-12.pdf

Dunno what the deal is in minor hockey, assuming guards are mandatory for kids.

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12-02-2011, 03:41 PM
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bp spec
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Originally Posted by nullterm View Post
No, right.

I meant here in men's league. Page 18. "Recommended." You forfeit insurance coverage from the league for any dental damage if not wearing a mouth guard. Half of the guys on the ice don't wear mouth guards.

http://www.icesports.com/PDF/ASHL%20...ok_2011-12.pdf

Dunno what the deal is in minor hockey, assuming guards are mandatory for kids.
I think there has been a misunderstanding here. I talk about Swedish hockey and rules

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12-03-2011, 05:43 AM
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nullterm
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Originally Posted by bp spec View Post
I think there has been a misunderstanding here. I talk about Swedish hockey and rules
Yeah. I was talking about men's league in Canada.

Facial protection in general is recommended, but not required. Except for one league I played in, and that was for insurance purposes. It's a you know the risks, it's your decision to make attitude.

However, minor hockey (kids and teens) all require full cages. Junior requires certified visors and mouthguards.

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12-03-2011, 07:03 AM
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bp spec
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Originally Posted by nullterm View Post
Yeah. I was talking about men's league in Canada.

Facial protection in general is recommended, but not required. Except for one league I played in, and that was for insurance purposes. It's a you know the risks, it's your decision to make attitude.

However, minor hockey (kids and teens) all require full cages. Junior requires certified visors and mouthguards.
Ive seen that every CHL'er uses a visor. Even the 15 and 16 year olds. If you dont mind, could you explain the rules for visors and cages for junior? Here in Sweden you have to use a cage until you start to play U-20's, or have the age for it. Which is the season after your 18th birthday

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