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Stick suggestions for beginners?

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Old
12-06-2011, 03:59 PM
  #26
hyster110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
Pro stock stick are also totally customized, some pros will have sticks made with less layers of carbon, no kevlar wrap etc., which can make them lighter and better performing, but also less durable than their retail counterparts. Not all pros do this, but some do. They get their sticks for free, and many will use new sticks every game (or some even more frequently) regardless, so durability isn't as much of a concern for them. Combined with their strength, size, and ability to really get a tonne of their weight into their shots, this makes for a lot of broken sticks in the pros.
plus the guys in the pro so alot more stickwork (slashing lifts, ext) than any beer league will do. that puts alot of stress on a stick

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12-06-2011, 04:03 PM
  #27
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Originally Posted by hyster110 View Post
plus the guys in the pro so alot more stickwork (slashing lifts, ext) than any beer league will do. that puts alot of stress on a stick
Definitely, these guys dish out very aggressive stick slashes, lifts, etc. with a tonne of force behind them.

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12-06-2011, 04:04 PM
  #28
newfr4u
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ponder View Post
Pro stock stick are also totally customized, some pros will have sticks made with less layers of carbon, no kevlar wrap etc., which can make them lighter and better performing, but also less durable than their retail counterparts. Not all pros do this, but some do. They get their sticks for free, and many will use new sticks every game (or some even more frequently) regardless, so durability isn't as much of a concern for them. Combined with their strength, size, and ability to really get a tonne of their weight into their shots, this makes for a lot of broken sticks in the pros.

With retail sticks, if you're shooting properly, they can last a long time. The odd ones have weak points/defects, and a bad slash or other impact can create weak points, but for the most part I'd say that retail sticks are really durable. There are fairly big/strong guys on my team who played CIS hockey, Junior A and Junior B, guys who really put a tonne of force into their shots, and I've seen them using the same sticks for like 6-12+ months. I've had the odd sticks that I break in a month or less, probably due to manufacturing defects or slashes/impacts, but most of my sticks last a year or more, and some I've never broken, even when being pretty rough with them.
thanks! but the pro-stock sticks you can buy at the stores are not the custom ones.

i've kinda always thought that sticks that the rest of us use must be more durable since we can't get a new one for every practice/game.

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12-06-2011, 04:04 PM
  #29
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Originally Posted by ponder View Post
Definitely, these guys dish out very aggressive stick slashes, lifts, etc. with a tonne of force behind them.
superlight stiff graphite sticks... + guys who can wrist shot from the blue line as hard as I can slap... yea
there is a reason why guys go through 100+ sticks a season and I go through one or two

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12-06-2011, 04:11 PM
  #30
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http://http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e7ITJzErOYg

this video is a crazy talk with danny briere

sorry i don;t know how to embed a video

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12-07-2011, 09:07 AM
  #31
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Some pro stock sticks have thinner shaft walls or no reinforcement and are much weaker in the shaft area. If the stick you're buying is an actual pro stock (i.e. not retail), it's a crap shoot as to what it is. They are often painted to look like retail, but you don't know if it has less material, more reinforcement, or what.

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12-07-2011, 02:31 PM
  #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newfr4u View Post
thanks! but the pro-stock sticks you can buy at the stores are not the custom ones.

i've kinda always thought that sticks that the rest of us use must be more durable since we can't get a new one for every practice/game.
Actual pro stock sticks that you buy in stores (the legit pro-returns) are indeed the custom ones. Most shops don't keep many in stock though, and if you're going to place like Sportcheck then they won't have any at all. As Jarick said, with these stick it's a total crap shoot as to what you're actually getting, some will be more fragile, so won't.
Quote:
Originally Posted by r3cc0s View Post
superlight stiff graphite sticks... + guys who can wrist shot from the blue line as hard as I can slap... yea
there is a reason why guys go through 100+ sticks a season and I go through one or two
That, and the fact that they're extra cautious with them. They don't want to break a stick mid-shift, so if they take a hard slash or otherwise feel the stick's integrity might be compromised, they'll generally just toss it (or sell it as a pro-return, as mentioned above) and move on to the next one, even if the stick may very well be just fine.

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12-07-2011, 03:29 PM
  #33
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I've even seen some sticks that were just high-end repaints.

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12-10-2011, 09:23 AM
  #34
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Okay so I bought the S13 int. with 65 flex but when I try to flex it I get the same result as the 85 flex stick- maybe a cm bending at most, definitely not an inch of flex and I really have to struggle to get it to bend that much anyway... Since I get the same result, no more, no less bending, I think maybe I'm just testing the flex wrong. I mean, I would think that going down 20 whatever units flex is in would cause at least a little more flex. I tried doing it like Jarick said in his blog (sort of pretending that you're taking a wrist shot) but it's proven rather difficult since the stick just slips around on the ground.
I hate to think that I just wasted all that money on a stick I can't use. If I keep practicing shots will I eventually get strong enough to be able to use it later on or should I just return it? Should I use a different method to test the flex?
Also, I haven't actually tried shooting with it yet because I don't have a shooting pad but I should be getting a melamine board today so maybe I'll have an update on that later...
I would also like to point out that I would normally try these things out before buying a pricey stick (or anything for that matter) but the closest shop is ~100 miles away and doesn't really carry anythong below 85 flex and none of my teammates really use anything lower than 85 either.

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12-10-2011, 09:53 AM
  #35
AIREAYE
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The S13 is a low-kick stick, it doesn't flex where you have your hands. If you do the same with a mid-kick stick, it'll feel more 'whippy' when it actually isn't simply because the mid0kick stick flexes where you have your bottom hand.

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12-10-2011, 10:52 AM
  #36
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Yeah, I thought since it was a low-kick it might make a difference but none of the things I read about testing flex seem to accommodate that... how would one properly assure the right flex on a low-kick stick?

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12-10-2011, 11:21 AM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ausername1 View Post
Yeah, I thought since it was a low-kick it might make a difference but none of the things I read about testing flex seem to accommodate that... how would one properly assure the right flex on a low-kick stick?
Simple physics would tell you that a mid-kick stick would be easier to load then a low-kick. The only way to properly assure that one is using the right flex of a low-kick is to actually go shoot with it, because there are a lot more factors into a shot than just your arms. If it actually is too stiff, one could take a look at the Warrior 55 flex Int. sticks.

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12-10-2011, 01:34 PM
  #38
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Regardless of where the kick point is, a 65 flex intermediate is going to be WAY easier to flex than a cut down 85 flex senior. Sounds like you're trying to flex it with the blade untaped, on a slippery surface, of course the blade will just slip before flexing much. If you want to really feel the flex difference, just for yourself, cut them both to the same height, tape them both up, and try flexing them on a grippier surface (like, say, the rubber flooring around ice rinks), you'll feel a major difference in stiffness.

Where you'll really feel the difference, though, is when actually shooting. Now, as a new player you won't be getting much flex out of any sticks when shooting, because you haven't learned how to properly transfer your body weight into the stick through the shot. This isn't something that comes quickly, it takes a LONG time to really learn how to shoot properly, practice a lot and don't get discouraged. I found that simply practicing the shooting motion on ice, without a puck, helped me feel that flex in the stick and learn how to get the proper body motion into muscle memory. You'll also probably want to start with shots where you transfer the weight to your outside foot (shots where you finish on your left foot if you're a right handed shot, for example), before moving on to the quick release, in-stride shots off your inside foot (shots where you're on your right foot the whole time if you're a right handed shot).

As for the shooting motion itself, the most popular shot right now is a sort of wrist/snap shot hybrid. You want to start by pulling the puck a bit forwards and towards you, closing the blade as you do this, then start loading the stick by getting some pressure/weight into your bottom hand, then whip the stick forward while quickly opening and closing the blade a bit (the wrist flick), focusing on pushing forward with your bottom hand and pulling back with your top hand to get some extra flex/whip out of the stick. All of this happens in like half a second, so obviously it's not easy and takes a long time to master, but ultimately that's how you should be shooting. Eventually you can progress to a bit more of a pure snap shot for when you really need to get the shot off quick (which is basically all of the above, but without the first step where you pull the puck in), but it's a tougher shot to take, and one to worry about later IMO. First work on this wrist/snap hybrid, try the motion a bunch without the puck, then later with the puck, eventually you'll get it down. Just don't expect it to happen in a couple skates, in all likelihood you won't have a deadly shot without months of regular practice.

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12-11-2011, 01:51 AM
  #39
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Just a quick question. I'm 5'9 and around 185 and use a 70 flex stick that goes just past my nose with skates off. Would it be a good idea to cut it an inch or two?

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12-11-2011, 09:30 AM
  #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Recast View Post
Just a quick question. I'm 5'9 and around 185 and use a 70 flex stick that goes just past my nose with skates off. Would it be a good idea to cut it an inch or two?
It would be a good idea to TRY it out, determining whether or not it truly is better will be up to your experience when you do cut it.

Btw, LOVE Anberlin and New Surrender, amazing music

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12-11-2011, 10:10 AM
  #41
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I'd like to try and take some video this winter of shooting but I need a new camera since the ex took mine. It would display the wrist/snap shot very well.

This is the shot:



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Like I said, auser, at your height and weight (likely strength), 65 might even be too stiff. It should be better than 85 though. Don't worry about feeling the thing whip around in your hand. You should still see improvement in your shooting.

-----

Recast, you could certainly try it. I've gone from up to my eyebrows in bare feet down to my chin in bare feet over the last six years. I really like a short stick and I seem to play better and score more with one. But that's just me.

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12-11-2011, 09:49 PM
  #42
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I think that most beginners won't ever be able to take the advantage of a mid or multiple kick point during a game... outside of practice with a static puck, a low kick point will be a better release for wristers and snappers, which most beginners have problems "getting it up" lol no pun intended.

Easton & Bauer FTW... actually, any decent stick with a relatively neutral curve from: sherwood, bauer, easton, warrior etc.. should be sufficient, but still I emphaise on finding a stick with good blade feel.

learning to "catch" the puck on a pass and knowing where it is on the stick is perhaps the most important part of the stick.

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03-01-2012, 09:23 AM
  #43
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So I ended up getting an easton s13 for sale, int 65 flex with a sakic curve. I can already tell how much easier it is to stickhandle with than my eq10! It's probably still a little tall for me but i'm not sure if I should cut it down again because after cutting it the first time I feel like it's already on the verge of being too stiff... as you can tell, I'm not exactly an expert so I could be very wrong about that.
When looking for a good lie, what do you mean by 'even wear'? I have wear on the toe and heel but not as much in the middle - probably because I like to stickhandle with the toe but shoot starting at the heel but I'm not sure if this is good technique... thoughts?

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03-01-2012, 09:27 AM
  #44
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That's pretty normal for the Sakic. I stickhandle at the heel and shoot from the mid/toe area. I actually get most wear right at the heel but the toe area gets all kinds of chewed up from shots and other wear.

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