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NHL draftees who chose another career

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12-08-2011, 09:42 AM
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66871
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NHL draftees who chose another career

Who are the most notable NHL draftees who chose a non-athletic career without ever signing a contract to play professionally. (Note that I said 'chose', so something like a career-ending medical condition being discovered during pre-contract screening would not apply).

As an example, Don Hennon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Hennon) is perhaps the most notable NBA draftee to turn down pro ball.

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12-08-2011, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by 66871 View Post
Who are the most notable NHL draftees who chose a non-athletic career without ever signing a contract to play professionally. (Note that I said 'chose', so something like a career-ending medical condition being discovered during pre-contract screening would not apply).

As an example, Don Hennon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Hennon) is perhaps the most notable NBA draftee to turn down pro ball.
Tom Glavine, pitched for the Atlanta Braves for many years.

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12-08-2011, 10:39 AM
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reckoning
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Though he did later try hockey again, Robin Sadler (#9 overall in '75 draft) might qualify:

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For Robin Sadler, life in the NHL was less than ideal. Sadler attended Montreal's 1975 training camp, but decided that he did not like the experience after just one week and went home to North Vancouver. He said there was too much pressure on him in pro hockey, and he didn't have any interest in turning pro. He had already signed a three-year, $250,000 contract that included a big signing bonus, but he returned the money, announcing his retirement for the first time in September 1975. Sadler then spent the 1975-76 season playing amateur hockey in Vancouver while earning $250 per week working for a delivery service. He came out of retirement in 1976 to play the 1976-77 season in Sweden, and would later take another shot at North American hockey....
http://www.hockeydraftcentral.com/1975/75009.html

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12-08-2011, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by reckoning View Post
Though he did later try hockey again, Robin Sadler (#9 overall in '75 draft) might qualify:
Yeah, he doesn't exactly fit the profile I described but still interesting because he essentially walked away from professional sports. I know there won't be a ton of guys that have done that over the years, so he is definitely notable in this regard (even though he came back).

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12-08-2011, 11:01 AM
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Paul Ranger (#183 overall in '02 draft)

Also Lee Sweatt, not sure if he counts because he wasn't drafted but he played 3 games last year for the Canucks. Then signed with Ottawa in the off season and soon after that quit hockey to pursue a career in business.

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12-08-2011, 11:22 AM
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Calderon
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I'd imagine it's super rare nowadays as even a rookie contract pays very well compared to any other field. Basically you'd have to be from a very wealthy family or be extremely gifted in another area as well (music, for instance). From monetary point of view not at least giving it a shot just doesn't make sense and who knows, it just might grow on you.

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12-08-2011, 12:30 PM
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HM: Jimmy Carson and Jim Carey, who were more interested in being lawyers than in hockey.

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12-08-2011, 02:50 PM
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I think the OP is referring more to someone like Dr. Fred Arthur, #8 pick of the Hartford Whalers in 1980.

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12-08-2011, 02:54 PM
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I was going to suggest Chad Brownlee (Canucks 6th round pick in 2003) but upon reading about him, he did play briefly in the ECHL. He ended up quitting hockey and became a country musician. Released a record and everything.

Chad Brownlee

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12-08-2011, 03:24 PM
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ray arthur was drafted in the first round by hartford decided to be a pro golfer instead.

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12-08-2011, 04:48 PM
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On the reverse, of course, there's Chris Drury - he played both baseball and hockey at a top level through high school until he had a wrist injury that ended his baseball career. He says that the injury "made the decision for him." and who knows what he would have decided? Or maybe he could have even played both? It would have meant lower pay in both sports, as the chances he would be available in the early season would be partially determined by his other team's success, and there would be a decent chance of injury while playing for the other pro team. But other athletes - most notably Bo Jackson - have done it, so Drury likely could have.

I would have loved to see Glavine try the feat... force the Braves to trade him to Los Angeles, and play for both the Dodgers and Kings. Would have been neat to watch, especially if Drury ALSO did it. It's Drury vs. Glavine in the World Series, and then Drury vs. Glavine in the Cup Finals! Woohoo!

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12-08-2011, 09:04 PM
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kaiser matias
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Dale Tallon was a prettty good junior golfer prior to being drafted. Played on the Canadian PGA tour I believe, and nearly decided to turn pro before the Canucks drafted him.

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