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The 2011 Single-A Draft (roster, picks, discussion, everything)

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Old
12-23-2011, 01:55 PM
  #26
chaosrevolver
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LW/RW/D - Jack McIntyre

* Stanley Cup Finalist (1953)
* 2x Top-20 in Goals
* 15+ Goals (1955, 1957, 1958, 1959)
* 5th in Playoff Goals (1953)
* 47th highest scorer over the span of his career (http://www.hockey-reference.com/play...rder_by=points)

McIntyre is listed as a defender on many sites, but as seventieslord has pointed out before, this is simply untrue. He was a winger (mainly leftwinger) first who could play defense if the team needed him to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Players: The Ultimate A-Z Guide of Everyone Who has Ever Played in the NHL
Right up until his last he had a passion for the game that inspired his friends to call him "Smilin' Jack".
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heroes: Stars of Hockey's Golden Era
A defensive minded left winger..
Quote:
Originally Posted by Legends of Hockey
Jack McIntyre was a fine offensive defenceman (wrong) who fell one game short of 500 in a solid career. His strength was moving up ice with the puck and working the power play, which he did to good effect with three different teams in 1950s.

...the young defender (wrong) scored 12 goals in 51 games as a rookie with the Boston Bruins. The next year, his solid work helped the Bruins reach the Stanley Cup finals. McIntyre scored a key goal and checked tenaciously when the team upset Detroit in the semi-finals.

After starting the 1953-54 season in the minors, McIntyre was traded to the Chicago Black Hawks for cash. He played a key offensive role for the struggling club and scored a career-high 18 goals in 1956-57. After a trade brought him to the Detroit Red Wings, McIntyre played his last three NHL seasons there before returning to the minors

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Old
12-23-2011, 02:00 PM
  #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bring Back Scuderi View Post
Last draft a three year peak was basically good enough for selection. I'm almost positive there's going to be no player from his era who can rival his five year numbers, wartime or not. It's not like his production slipped after the war either, his short-career is the only thing holding him back from being a higher selection imo. If he wouldn't have gotten the lifetime ban he would have the chance to continue producing out of wartime as he did already.
Unfortunately that's not how these drafts work. I question his resume for quite a few reasons..normally those with war-torn years that get picked, have longer and better resumes. At this stage though, you may be right.

Quote:
It's easy to knock Gallinger for the short career and wartime years but I think we're gonna see quite a few dubious era/league selections in this draft, whether it's European domestic league stars or stars from when the international competition wasn't up to snuff yet.
Sure. There's gonna be knocks on every player in this draft..otherwise they would have gone higher. I just feel Gallinger's is quite a severe one.

Quote:
Honestly I found #1C to be the most challenging spot to fill by this point and the crop is just pretty poor imo. Of course there's players that slipped by me but I think Gallinger's resume will hold up compared to the other #1Cs out there, especially if there's 8 of them.
Also found center to be rather weak. There are a few I had higher than Gallinger (well..I picked 4 and then just left the others, including Don, unranked.)

Like I said, I'll do some more looking into him. Read a few things from other members and looked at his career briefly, and just wasn't that impressed.

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12-23-2011, 02:21 PM
  #28
VanIslander
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bring Back Scuderi View Post
Honestly I found #1C to be the most challenging spot to fill by this point...
Ditto. Hence my digging for off the board picks and the announced decision to draft two top-6 centers on day 1.

I would have snapped up Gallinger as 4C or extra skater if he had still been around. That said, he can handle top-6 level competition in this draft, as there probably aren't clearly 16 better centers available for the role! As for his career length, it's 4.5 good seasons, ended by non-playing issue that makes you think 'what if' in the same way as a career-ending injury. It's not like the guy was demoted to the minors for the next decade, a move which would question his ability to compete at the highest level of competition. He was a productive top-6 starter for over four years against the best of his era.

Quote:
...Don Gallinger, the 5-year NHL pro who led the Bruins in assists and points in 1945-46 and in assists again two seasons later, 7th in league assists the 1947-48 season, scoring 153 NHL points in 222 NHL games, including 3 goals in the 1943 Stanley Cup Finals run and 6 points in the 1945 Finals run. Number 11, the nephew of HHOFer Shorty Green, was the second youngest NHLer in history at age 17 and centered the Kid Line until a gambling scandal ended a decent career five seasons later at the tender age of 22.



Quote:
".. good shooting, swift skating..."
http://books.google.ca/books?id=wpbL...bruins&f=false

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12-23-2011, 02:21 PM
  #29
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D - Shawn Chambers

* 625 NHL Games, 235 Points
* Stanley Cup Champion (1995, 1999)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Chambers had a relatively short career of just 625 games over 13 seasons. But in that time, he contributed to two Stanley Cup wins and went to the finals with the 1991 North Stars. In all, he played in 94 playoff games. Chambers could defend, and was useful on the powerplay. He had a respectable 235 career points, and topped 21 points eight times, with only a major injury stopping that from becoming a ten-year streak. GF and GA stats show that he was frequently used on both special teams. His value was recognized when he was named Team USA's 7th defenseman at the 1996 World Cup. (he played one game)

Chambers was actually a pretty solid defenseman over the course of his 625 NHL game career with Minnesota, Washington, Tampa Bay, New Jersey and Dallas. As he matured he learned to play within his limitations, the true sign of valuable depth defender.

He was not a top line defender, but he was pretty under-rated as a depth blue liner. After all, in his time in New Jersey he paired with the great Scott Stevens, and that pairing shouldered the load against the opposition's top lines night after night.

Chambers had a reputation as not much of a physical player, which was unfair. He was average sized for a NHL defenseman at 6'2" and 200lbs but he didn't shy away from throwing clean bodychecks. While his hits may not have rattled the glass spectacularly, he played with enthusiasm, especially when getting lots of ice time.

That said, Chambers was probably best described as intellectual defender. He had great anticipation and sense of positioning. He understood the game and could read on-coming attacks expertly. With little fanfare he would diffuse attacks with a quick stick and short breakout passes.

Offensively Chambers was best described as efficient. His skating would not dazzle anyone. He would rather safely pass the puck out of the zone than lug it. His shot was nothing special though because he could get his soft wrist shots pass shot blockers and to the front of the net, he would often eat up 2nd unit power play minutes.

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12-23-2011, 02:23 PM
  #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
Ditto. Hence my digging for off the board picks and the announced decision to draft two top-6 centers on day 1.

I would have snapped up Gallinger as 4C or extra skater if he had still been around. That said, he can handle top-6 level competition in this draft, as there probably aren't clearly 16 better centers available for the role! As for his career length, it's 4.5 good seasons, ended by non-playing issue that makes you think 'what if' in the same way as a career-ending injury. It's not like the guy was demoted to the minors for the next decade, a move which would question his ability to compete at the highest level of competition. He was a productive top-6 starter for over four years against the best of his era.
Eh, I agree that he should be taken in this draft. Just don't know about first line abilities or being taken this early in the A draft..

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Old
12-23-2011, 05:31 PM
  #31
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Quebec selects:

G Fred Chittick
- 1896 Retro Vezina (2.0 GAA, next best 2.9)
- 1897 Retro Vezina (2.3 GAA, next best 3.3)
- Captain of the Ottawa Senators, 1896-1897

LW/C Jacques Richard

- 7th in goals, 1981
- 10th in points 1981

Legends of Hockey
Quote:
As a junior phenomenon with the Quebec Ramparts of the QMJHL, Jacques Richard was blessed with an overabundance of natural talent and a set of wheels fit for the Indianapolis 500. His teammate with the Ramparts was Guy Lafleur and some observers of the day speculated that Richard might prove to be the brighter light of the two at the NHL level.

But before testing the big-league waters, the two all-stars pooled their resources to bring the Memorial Cup to Quebec City in 1971. By the following season, Richard was labeled a "can't miss" prospect on the strength of netting 71 goals and 89 assists in only 61 games.

He was selected 2nd overall by the Atlanta Flames in the 1972 Amateur Draft. He joined the club straightway and was touted across the state as the next "Richard" as in "The Rocket" or "The Pocket Rocket." Needless to say, when held up against such high standards, Richard proved to be a disappointment.

Instead, Richard signed as a free agent with the Quebec Nordiques, the original domain of his junior triumphs. He took some time to regain his confidence, but when he did, in 1980-81, he exploded for 52 goals and 51 assists.

The real Jacques Richard appeared to have finally arrived in the NHL. But his success was short-lived. His off-ice behaviour continued to take its toll on Richard the athlete. His numbers fell into decline the following season, and by 1983, he was washed up.

Once he got a taste of the NHL's high life, he began to consume higher levels of alcohol, gamble to excess and, later, consume cocaine. He had a very likeable personality, but after three less-than-stellar seasons, the Flames unloaded him to the Sabres.
Nordiques Legends
Quote:
was Quebec Ramparts' Jacques Richard. Blessed with an overabundance of natural talent and incredible skating ability, Richard was a junior teammate of Lafleur. At the time some scouts insisted Richard was the better player. In his final three years of junior Richard totalled 186 goals and 399 points in 168 games. He added 80 goals and and 165 points in 75 playoff games and helped the Ramparts capture the 1971 Memorial Cup

Richard was selected 2nd overall by the Atlanta Flames in the 1972 Amateur Draft. He jumped directly to the NHL but couldn't live up the enormous pressure of being hyped as "hockey's next Richard," a marketing ploy comparing him to the immortal Rocket Richard and Henri Richard.

His demons continued to curse him after hockey. In 1989 he returned from a vacation to Colombia with $1.5 million worth of cocaine hidden in a golf bag. He was sentenced to seven years in jail.
LW Tord Lundstrom



4 points in 5 Canada Cup games
66 points in 67 World Championship games

Legends of Hockey:
Quote:
Born on March 4, 1945, in Kiruna, a town above the Arctic Circle that has given Swedish hockey a whole host of leading hockey stars, Lundstrom began playing with the local Kiruna AIF, where the talented player caught the eye of Brynas scouts. Other teams offered Lundstrom more attractive contracts, but he gave his word to Brynas. On June 1, 1963, the day when the rules allowed all players to sign contracts, Lundstrom kept his word and got off the train at the station in Gavle.

This marked the beginning of a remarkable career in Swedish hockey. Lundstrom's achievements include nine gold medals, four silver medals and one bronze medal from the Swedish national championships, in which Lundstrom played 428 games and scored 307 goals.

Swept along by the wave that carried many of the best Swedish players to the NHL, Lundstrom joined the Detroit Red Wings for the start of the 1973-74 season. But the North American hockey scene wasn't for everyone and Lundstrom, like many other excellent Swedish hockey players, returned home in 1973 and rejoined his native Brynas.


Last edited by Hedberg: 12-24-2011 at 02:31 AM.
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Old
12-23-2011, 08:32 PM
  #32
seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
There goes my Day 2 or 3 guy! Hedberg and I almost picked him last draft.
I am having a bit of buyers' remore on that one. He is my favourite rw here, yes, but there are five others who could do his job, and only Lundstrom was picked from them . But 1st line C and LW, well, there are only two of each I would be truly satisfied with. Hickey was one. Gallinger wasn't.

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Old
12-23-2011, 11:04 PM
  #33
Jafar
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But who cares about chemistry if there's no playoff , you just draft guys you think of worthy of this level no?

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Old
12-23-2011, 11:06 PM
  #34
VanIslander
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There will be a playoffs for those that want it: CHALLENGER SERIES format. It's been done in a previous year's depth draft and worked well.

More importantly, the point of drafting a quality squad is not the same as the end; that is to say, it's worth drafting a good team without thinking about winning some match-up. Ideally, the playoffs should always be beside the point.

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12-23-2011, 11:07 PM
  #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BenchBrawl View Post
But who cares about chemistry if there's no playoff , you just draft guys you think of worthy of this level no?
Who are you referring to?

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Old
12-24-2011, 12:50 AM
  #36
seventieslord
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Today I saw get selected:

- my 5th-favourite scoring center
- 5 of my top-20 scoring wingers
- my #2 defensive winger
- Three of my top-5 defensemen and five of my top-20

as for goalies... Hedberg, it's not that I don't like Chittick in particular... I don't like anyone available. Not a single goalie excites me right now.


Last edited by seventieslord: 12-24-2011 at 01:00 AM.
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12-24-2011, 12:59 AM
  #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bring Back Scuderi View Post
Traktor have made our three picks.
D Tim Watters
Perfect example of how hard it is to pick among 70s-90s defensemen right now. Watters is just the classic 500-900 game, 17-20 minute defensive defeseman and it's hard to say he's much better or worse than a number of guys still available, including a couple guys I'll be happy to settle for later on, and a few guys already taken (Carkner, Zombo, Cirella, Wells...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyShoe1721 View Post
D Barry Long



LW Pat Hickey

Long was top-15 on my list for defensemen. Maybe on day one of the MLD that wouldn't be a compliment, but down here, where judgments can vary a lot, it is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chaosrevolver View Post
Will be doing bio's in a bit.

For now, the Bursa Janissaries will select:

LW: Archie "Bones" Briden
LW/RW/D: Jack McIntyre
D: Shawn Chambers
Dang, you had a GOOD first day back.

- Briden kept falling down my list every time he got near the top of it. I started to wonder what I ever saw in him... then you reminded me, the big-4 league. I had completely forgotten. that was pretty much the early WCHL under a different name.

- McIntyre got to the top of my defensive winger list (though this deep he ain't bad as a top line glue guy either) but I just couldn't grab him as a defensive guy. When I did google searches I saw him described as a "streaky scoring winger" so I started to see him as more of a secondary offensive player who was inconsistent. Maybe he was inconsistent offensively, but for him it was just one of his facets. Thank you for reposting some of the things I found before, because I had pretty much forgotten that.

- Chambers, as a two-time #5 cup winner, was #5 on my list for defensemen.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedberg View Post
C Jacques Richard

- 7th in goals, 1981
- 10th in points 1981

Legends of Hockey


Nordiques Legends


RW Tord Lundstrom



4 points in 5 Canada Cup games
66 points in 67 World Championship games

Legends of Hockey:
Where I have looked, both Richard and Lundstrom are LWs.


Last edited by seventieslord: 12-24-2011 at 01:17 AM.
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Old
12-24-2011, 01:52 AM
  #38
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Bob Lorimer, D



Not sure why he hasn't been picked before, when we tend to gravitate to the players who won cups. Heck, not sure how I haven't picked him before, since I gravitate towards guys who played more minutes for more successful teams.

- 6'0", 200 lbs
- Stanley Cup (1980, 1981)
- #2 and #3 in TOI in two Stanley Cup Victories
- traded for a 1st round pick to get Pat LaFontaine
- Career adjusted +37
- 46% career PK usage
- Averaged 20.26 minutes per game for 529 games

From the time teams began dressing two or more pairings of defensemen to the lockout, a period of about 80 years, just three defensemen remained unselected who had been top-3 on a cup winner. Lorimer was one of them, and the only one to do it twice, and the only one to be a #2 on a cup winner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by loh.net
In 1978-79, the journeyman blueliner finally got his shot on Long Island. He quickly settled into his role as a plumber charged with staying close to his own zone while the Denis Potvins of the team performed more offensive chores.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Official Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1983
One of the NHL's premier defensive defensemen... not a high scorer but efficient in own zone at moving the puck and clearing the front of the net...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Official Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1984
Vlades... For Vladimir... for outstanding play against Soviets in 1978 Izvestia tournament... solid, stay at home defenseman... intelligent, articulate, extremely friendly... a survivor... easy to play with because he's so steady... always in position.
Since basically every defenseman who had anything to do with the Isles dynasty is selected, I thought I would provide a little synopsis of their usage in those four seasons - obviously as a way to highlight Bob Lorimer.

Year Name TOI ES TOI PP TOI SH TOI GP PO GP notes
1980 POTVIN, DENIS 27.40 20.52 4.00 2.89 31 21 clear #1
1980 LORIMER, BOB 23.63 20.22 0.25 3.17 74 21 clear #2
1980 POTVIN, JEAN 22.84 18.99 1.77 2.08 32 0 DNP in playoffs, not sure why
1980 LEWIS, DAVE 22.24 18.40 0.19 3.65 62 0 was #3-4 until trade for Goring
1980 MORROW, KEN 19.82 17.91 0.00 1.91 18 20 last 20 games of RS; role likely increased slightly in PO
1980 LANGEVIN, DAVE 19.30 17.93 0.08 1.29 76 21 clear #4
1980 LANE, GORD 18.59 17.04 0.08 1.47 55 21 #5
1980 PERSSON, STEFAN 17.93 13.24 3.89 0.80 73 21 #6/PP specialist
1981 POTVIN, DENIS 27.47 18.87 4.76 3.83 74 18 clear #1
1981 PERSSON, STEFAN 20.55 14.16 4.66 1.73 80 7 #2 in overall TOI, but heavy PP use, very little at ES
1981 LORIMER, BOB 20.47 17.54 0.06 2.87 73 18 clear #2/3
1981 MORROW, KEN 20.18 17.48 0.06 2.64 80 18 clear #4
1981 LANGEVIN, DAVE 18.43 16.13 0.18 2.13 75 18 clear #5
1981 McEWEN, MIKE 15.59 14.52 0.61 0.47 13 17 clear #6, offensive specialist
1981 LANE, GORD 15.58 14.32 0.07 1.18 60 12 clear #7, stepped in as #6 when Persson got hurt in PO
1981 POTVIN, JEAN 14.82 13.43 0.68 0.71 18 0 clear #8, just hanging on by this point
1982 POTVIN, DENIS 25.79 18.66 4.22 2.91 60 19 clear #1
1982 MORROW, KEN 23.02 19.86 0.06 3.10 75 19 clear #2
1982 PERSSON, STEFAN 20.77 13.93 3.76 3.08 70 13 again #3 in overall TOI, heavy on PP, little ES
1982 LANGEVIN, DAVE 20.20 17.11 0.13 2.96 73 19 clear #3/4
1982 McEWEN, MIKE 18.43 15.40 1.45 1.59 73 15 clear #5/PP specialist
1982 JONSSON, TOMAS 16.68 15.10 1.37 0.22 70 10 clear #6/PP specialist
1982 LANE, GORD 16.19 15.45 0.00 0.73 51 19 RS #7, but played the 19 PO GP the 3 specialists didn't
1983 POTVIN, DENIS 27.47 19.53 4.23 3.70 69 20 clear #1
1983 JONSSON, TOMAS 22.53 19.33 2.02 1.18 72 20 clear #2, now trusted at ES
1983 MORROW, KEN 20.83 16.96 0.07 3.80 79 19 clear #3
1983 LANGEVIN, DAVE 19.00 16.80 0.00 2.20 73 8 clear #4, injured in PO
1983 PERSSON, STEFAN 18.09 14.14 2.61 1.34 70 18 clear #5, PP specialist as usual
1983 McEWEN, MIKE 17.05 13.95 1.60 1.50 42 12 clear #6, reduced playoff role
1983 LANE, GORD 13.42 11.99 0.00 1.43 44 18 RS #7, stepped in as #6 for Lang's injury & McEwen's ineff. In PO


Last edited by seventieslord: 12-29-2011 at 03:48 AM.
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Old
12-24-2011, 02:05 AM
  #39
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Joe Matte, D



- 5'11", 165 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1924)
- Top-10 in defense scoring 4 times (8th-NHL-1920, 4th-NHL-1921, 3rd-WCHL-1923, 4th-PCHA-1924)
- Best percentage scores among defensemen (vs. #1 defenseman): 69, 56, 52, 46, 39
- Star forward in senior hockey for two seasons prior to joining the pros as a defenseman

Quote:
Originally Posted by Iain Fyffe
@seventieslord Assuming you mean Joe A. Matte, according to my records he was nothing but a defenceman, at least during his pro days
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iain Fyffe
@seventieslord Also Matte had several good years, was certainly more on offence but not bad defence. Looks like he played fwd as an amateur.

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12-24-2011, 02:28 AM
  #40
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Frank St. Marseille, RW



- 5'11", 180 lbs
- Stanley Cup Finalist (1968, 1969, 1970)
- 45 pts in 62 playoff games as a St. Louis Blue; this record stood for over a decade until bernie Federko topped him; he is still 6th all-time
- 3rd highest-scoring player of all-time as of this selection (1st in assists - awesome for a winger!)
- Five 50+ point seasons
- best five percentage scores: 76, 60, 58, 49, 45

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Pelletier
Frank St. Marseille got interested in hockey later than most Canadian players. He did not start skating until the age of eight and didn't play organized hockey until he was 14. He played for the junior team in Levack until he was 21 and graduated from those ranks. Most players had been moved up by then, but not Frank.

He had a tryout though in the juniors with the Toronto Marlboros (OHA) when he was 17. He and Jim Pappin went to Toronto to try their luck. Pappin made the Marlboros, Frank didn't. Frank remembered that time very well.

"There must have been 100 boys at the camp. I only got on the ice a couple of times. I don't think anyone even noticed me. Before I knew it, I was back on the bus, heading home. "

In 1961 and 1962 Frank had three game tryouts with the New Haven Blades of the Eastern League and with Sudbury Wolves of the Eastern Professional League, but he wasn't retained either time. Then during the fall of 1962, he tried out with the Chatham Maroons of the Senior Ontario Hockey Association and made the team, earning $ 50 per game. He got 39 points in 45 games.

Then Chatham moved to the IHL and Frank moved with the team. He scored a respectable 64 points in 70 games during the 1963-64 season. Chatham then dropped out of the league and Frank was picked up by the Port Huron Flags (IHL). Frank had three impressive seasons with Port Huron between 1964-67. He scored 97, 90 and 118 points for a total of 305 points in only 210 games.

At this point Frank was 27-years old when he went on to beat all the odds. He got a shot at the NHL thanks to his brother Frederick. Frederick was struggling to make it as a classical singer in Los Angeles when he decided to write a letter extolling the overlooked abilities of his brother Frank to Lynn Patrick, who at that time was the GM and coach of the Los Angeles Blades (WHL). Hockey people were looking for talent everywhere at the time. Patrick was sufficiently interested to take a trip to Toledo to see Frank play for the Port Huron, Michigan team. He was impressed by Frank's play and signed him as a free agent for his St.Louis organization on November 23, 1967, which is where he landed when the Blades' organization did not get the NHL berth.

Frank started the 1967-68 season by playing for the Kansas City Blues (CHL). After 11 games Frank had 15 points and was recalled to St.Louis where he made his NHL debut as a 28-year old. He scored 16 goals and 32 points in 57 games for St.Louis and earned himself a regular spot on the team. Frank played in three consecutive Stanley Cup finals, losing all three of them.

Franks tenure in St.Louis lasted for six seasons before he was traded to Los Angeles for Paul Curtis on January 27,1973. At the time of the trade Frank held the St.Louis team records for games played and points. Despite that Frank was a very underrated player. He was a consistent and reliable performer.

Meanwhile, all this time, brother Frederick still was struggling to establish himself in his profession. Frank admitted that there were many parallels between the brothers.

"Maybe it's the way we grew up, but we're not the kind of guys who give up on what we want. It was tough for me, but it has been tougher for Fred. If I was underrated as an hockey player, Fred is more underrated as a singer. I wish I could write a letter for him that would open doors for him as his letter opened one for me. But he is beginning to get some breaks now and I know he will make it."

Frank came from a family of nine children, three brothers and six sisters, all who were married. They all grew up in the mining town of Levack, Ontario. Their father worked in the mines. When he came home from the dangerous, dirty work down below ground, he relaxed with music and turned his children to music. Frank's father was an outstanding athlete who played softball as a shortstop until he was 48.

Anyway, Frank played in Los Angeles until the 1976-77 season. His best season in LA was a 53 point performance in 74-75. His career high came in St.Louis 69-70 (59 points). Frank finished his hockey career in 1977-78 when he played one season in the AHL for the Nova Scotia Voyageurs.

What are the odds today to get to the NHL by writing a letter? It's more probable to get struck by lightning, but Frank managed to get a shot at the big league thanks to his brothers letter. He was an unspectacular player but he deserved every minute in the NHL.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey, 1972-1977 editions
has always been one of St. Louis' top scorers, especially in the playoffs... a smooth skater who plays smart, aggressive hockey... smart veteran center... never a prolific goal scorer, but check his assist record... "goals? what's the difference between goals and assists as long as you get a point and your team wins?"... accomplished defensive forward... steady veteran... best faceoff man on the club... was voted the Kings unsung hero two years ago...
St. Marseille didn't just pile up points in the playoffs against his expansion cousins. The Blues got shut down considerably against the Habs and Bruins those years, but he did ok. 13 Blues played all three of those playoffs and 40 or more of those 46 playoff games. Here are the players who managed to post more than 2 points in those 12 finals matches, all losses, in which the Blues scored a total of 17 goals:

st. marseille 6
berenson 5
mccreary 3
barclay plager 3
picard 3


Last edited by seventieslord: 12-24-2011 at 02:33 AM.
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12-24-2011, 02:30 AM
  #41
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Where I have looked, both Richard and Lundstrom are LWs.
Thanks, I'll fix that. Richard is occasionally listed as being a centre.

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12-24-2011, 02:49 AM
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Dang, you had a GOOD first day back.

- Briden kept falling down my list every time he got near the top of it. I started to wonder what I ever saw in him... then you reminded me, the big-4 league. I had completely forgotten. that was pretty much the early WCHL under a different name.

- McIntyre got to the top of my defensive winger list (though this deep he ain't bad as a top line glue guy either) but I just couldn't grab him as a defensive guy. When I did google searches I saw him described as a "streaky scoring winger" so I started to see him as more of a secondary offensive player who was inconsistent. Maybe he was inconsistent offensively, but for him it was just one of his facets. Thank you for reposting some of the things I found before, because I had pretty much forgotten that.

- Chambers, as a two-time #5 cup winner, was #5 on my list for defensemen.
Always good to get praise from you bud.

Matte was my #1 choice at D actually so good job selecting him. Haven't decided how I will use McIntyre but he provides a lot of versatility. At the moment...he is slotted on a second line.

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12-24-2011, 03:13 AM
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interesting, and the opposite of what you might expect. From last years's drafts:

- 12 from the MLD are still remaining
- 10 from the AAA
- 7 from the AA

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12-24-2011, 03:41 AM
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TheDevilMadeMe
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In 1995, Shawn Chambers was Scott Stevens partner against Jaromir Jagr in the 2nd round as Lemaire put together a 5 man unit to match up against Jagr, and then was Scott Stevens partner again in the finals against Detroit. He was a lot more than just a #5.

In 1999, I believe he was a typical #5 for Dallas, playing on the bottom pairing

I think he's a better player than Tommy Albelin


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12-24-2011, 04:57 AM
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Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Where I have looked, both Richard and Lundstrom are LWs.
Richard is a centre and Lundström is a winger, dont know where you get your information from.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TDMM
In 1995, Shawn Chambers was Scott Stevens partner against Jaromir Jagr in the 2nd round as Lemaire put together a 5 man unit to match up against Jagr, and then was Scott Stevens partner again in the finals against Detroit. He was a lot more than just a #5.

In 1999, I believe he was a typical #5 for Dallas, playing on the bottom pairing

I think he's a better player than Tommy Albelin
Because he was he was given a tough opposition one time he is better than Albelin?

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12-24-2011, 10:10 AM
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Because he was he was given a tough opposition one time he is better than Albelin?
No, because he was better suited to being a complimentary top pairing defenseman because of his slightly better hockey skills.

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12-24-2011, 10:46 AM
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Here's a bio of a MLD 2011 picked player: rugged 6'3, 194 lbs. center Alexander Kozhevnikov, who played on and off the national team for most of the eighties, from the 1981 Canada Cup win through the 1988 Olympics gold. He had 8 points in 7 games in the 1984 Olympics gold medal winning tourney, including crucial goals against Canada, Sweden and Czechoslovakia. In the 1988 Olympics he had a lesser role and only was in on the scoring twice. He was a big, talented pivot with a hard, accurate shot (see the :55 second mark of the linked youtube video below for a demo of it in a key Olympic goal). His troubles came mostly from the overly-regimental Soviet system, especially control freak Tikhonov, who kept him off the national team at times for punishment in disobeying his training and curfew rules. There is no denying that Kozhevnikov had world class talent, that he scored key goals internationally, having a couple of great tourneys, having shown a consistent ability to score domestically, even leading his countrymen in goals scored in 1982.



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ALEXANDER KOZHEVNIKOV (29) scored the goal that gave the Soviet Union their sixth set of Olympic gold medals for ice hockey. Kozhevnikov, who collected another gold medal at the Calgary Games in 1988, played briefly in the West for the Durham Wasps in Great Britain as well as AIK Stockholm in Sweden.

Six and a half minutes in, the Soviets stamp their authority on the game.

Shortly after Drozdetsky misses a wide-open net, the Soviet regroup in center ice as ALEXANDER KOZHEVNIKOV (29) gathers a pass.. at the red line and charges the Czechoslovak blue line. Confronted by a pair of defensemen, the 25-year-old Spartak Moscow wing winds up and deploys an always un-Soviet-like slapshot. The puck catches the crossbar and ricochets off Sindel’s shoulder into the Czechoslovak net for a 1-0 Soviet lead :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAD51...eature=related

Although a regular top goal-scorer in the Soviet elite league, Kozhevnikov never did command a regular place with the USSR national team. Despite six goals at the 1982 IIHF World Championships in Finland, the would-be Calgary Flames’ NHL draft pick (1985, 11th round, # 227 overall) did not make the Soviet team for the 1983 IIHF event in West Germany. For his career, the native of Penza appeared at four major international tournaments (24 ga, 10 go 9 as, 19 pts) for the Soviet Union.

Kozhevnikov finished among the top scorers at Sarajevo with three goals and nine points in seven games.
http://hfboards.com/private.php?do=newpm&pmid=3525763



Quote:
Aleksandr Kozhevnikov began his hockey career in 1975 with Dizelist Penza and in 1977 joined Spartak Moskva, playing there until 1986. From 1986-89 Kozhevnikov played with Krylya Sovetov Moskva and then spent couple of years playing abroad, before finishing his career in 1995-97, again with Krylya Sovetov. Kozhevnikov never won a Soviet title, but won four silvers (1981-1983) and four bronzes (1979-80, 1986, 1989) at the Soviet Championships. He was also the leading goalscorer at the 1982 Soviet Championships with 43 goals. Internationally besides his two Olympic golds, Kozhevnikov was a World and European Champion in 1982, and also won bronze at the 1984 Canada Cup.
http://www.sports-reference.com/olym...evnikov-1.html

Here is the story of Kozhevnikov as told in Lawrence Martin's The Red Machine:

Quote:
Originally Posted by TRM, page 203
Tikhonov had so much talent in these times that anyone seeking to challenge his ways risked finding himself replaced. There were those who dared to do it... Drozdetsky was one... Balderis. who went his own way, another. And there was a third sining Soviet in those days, the unique Alexander Kozhevnikov.
In the 1982-83 season Kozhevnikov finished 2nd in the Soviet league scoring, yet...
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRM, pg.204
Despite his second place standing in the scoring race, Alexander Kozhevnikov didn't get invited to these championships. He was in the doghouse again. All one had to do was look at Kozhevnikov to know that he and the Stalinists would not hit it off. He was lanky, unshaven; his hair shot all over the place and his eyes had an independent, challenging glare. Concomitant with the look was his playing style - rugged, fearless, temperamental, uncolonial. He yelled at teammates, fought with opponents, paid little heed to practice times or curfews and stole away from the training camp barracks at every opportunity. That he got as far as he did was testimony to his dramatic skill with the puck and a bull's eye shot.
He had been kicked out of a prestegious school for vandalism and years later was invited back to give a speech as a hockey star and he refused to forget the insult of having been expelled and declined the offer. The school still put up his picture.

Kozhennikov was struggling until in 1980 the new national team coach Kalugin said:
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRD, pg205
"But I believe in you. I will work with you. We'll put an end to your slovenly life." Kozhevnikov began following the coach's instructions to the letter. "When he said 20 slapshots into the net, I did them. Not 19, not 21, but 20." He began scoring at a remarkable pace, enough to get him invited to the national team and to stir interest from the Calgary Flames.
Soon however he desired to escape the training camp regime of the Soviet system and missed curfew and went away on off days, contrary to the rules.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TRM. 205
He was punished many times for taking off, but, with Kalugin, who could not afford to lose a player of Kozhevnikov's skills, he could survive... Kulagin sometimes had to pamper the star, to the extent that he showed up that time with a folding cot at Kozhevnikov's apartment away from the base, so he could monitor him and dissuade him from going on a binge.
Then when Kalugin died, Kozhevnikov was transferred to the Soviet Wings team.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TRM. 206
Kozhevnikov suffered through four knee operations in his career but still managed to reach an elite plateau in Soviet hockey - 250 goals.
In the 1984 Olympics he scored "the critical first goal" against Czechoslovakia, one of four goals he had that tourney. In the 1984 Canada Cup the Soviets won all five round robin games including one against Canada, but lost to Canada in the medal round, with key on-ice mistakes by two players, but it was a third, Kozhevnikov, whom Tikhonov blamed officially in a Soviet magazine interview months later.


Last edited by VanIslander: 12-24-2011 at 11:54 AM.
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12-24-2011, 10:53 AM
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The Minutemen select rugged 6'3, 194 lbs. center Alexander Kozhevnikov
Dreakmur selected him in the MLD.

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12-24-2011, 10:58 AM
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chaosrevolver
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interesting, and the opposite of what you might expect. From last years's drafts:

- 12 from the MLD are still remaining
- 10 from the AAA
- 7 from the AA
Very interesting stuff.

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12-24-2011, 11:00 AM
  #50
chaosrevolver
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The Bursa Janissaries select:

D/RW: Marty Howe
RW: Lasse Oksanen
D/RW: Valeri Nikitin

Bio's to come later.

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