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The 2011 Single-A Draft (roster, picks, discussion, everything)

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Old
12-25-2011, 11:01 AM
  #76
seventieslord
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Dangit, I just can't stop drafting defensemen. Too many of them stand out for me right now.

Francois Beauchemin, D: #3 D-man on the cup-winning Ducks (players who have done this are rarer than hen's teeth right now), and has been a huge penalty killer in his career: 55% for teams 10% worse than the league average. (that 55% is the most among available players, of course) His NHL coaches, Randy Carlyle and Ron Wilson, have put him on the ice for massive minutes. 443 games into his career, he is averaging 24:41 per game. He has done this for teams that have been, on average, slightly above average.

Among all post-lockout defensemen, Beauchemin is 13th in minutes per game. He is a minute ahead of the next available guy (19th) and two minutes ahead of the next (31st), and these other guys both racked up their minutes for bad teams, unlike Francois.

-----------------------------

Tracy Pratt, D



Pratt didn't put up a lot of points in the NHL but he did munch a lot of minutes. 22.26 per game, to be exact (almost), in his 10-year NHL career. This includes 3 monster years in the mid-70s:

1973: 24.15/game, 2nd on Buffalo to Tim Horton, 32nd in NHL
1974: 24.15/game, split time between 2 teams, 29th in NHL
1975: 25.78/game, 2nd on Vancouver to Bob Dailey, 18th in NHL

Pratt got very little PP time and was nothing special offensively at ES, either. So you can't call him a special teams beast. But you can call him a PK beast: killing 51% of his team's penalties, he's 3rd among available defensemen. He even got into the 1975 all-star game solely thanks to his defensive ability.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1973
son of hall of famer Babe Pratt and, like his dad, is a big defenseman who loves to hit... sabres are satisfied with his defensive ability and that's what counts for a defenseman...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1975
had best offensive season, but primary value is defensively, where he uses his size to clear opposing forwards from the slot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1976
A Bryan watson-type competitor who risks his health for the team... one of his biggest thrills was his selection by Fred Shero for the all-star game last season...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorthanded: The Untold Story Of the Seals
"He was a big, strong individual and very aggressive. He was good with the puck and had a good sense of humour." - Charlie Burns

"I remember as a kid that I wouldn't let anybody touch my equipment," Pratt recalled. "I used to clean it thoroughly every Sunday. I took pride in my stuff. The game has to be learned and respected."... Pratt earned a reputation with the seals as a tough guy on the ice and a guy who had a good time off it... He used his size to add some much-needed muscle to the first-year club... "I brought brawn to the club. I handled myself pretty well. I was loquacious and brought some respectability to the team. I stuck up for my smaller teammates."

Pratt's favourite memory of his rookie season was a game against the Rangers in which he battled toe-to-toe with tough guy Reg Fleming. "We were going at it for almost 15 minutes," claimed Pratt. "We started in front of the goal and ended up at center ice. After the game, the Hells Angels were all around my car to congratulate me. I even met Sonny Barger, the founder of the Hells Angels."

Pratt is certain that he cost himself some longevity as a hockey player. "I was always anti-management. I was never a diplomat. It cost me several years off my career."

Pratt summed up his career, saying: "I was a journeyman player that brought an awful lot of try every night. I had an all-out effort. Sometimes, going all-out, you don't accomplish anything. You'd come back to the bench exhausted. Experience teaches you. I was also tough in front of my own net."

Mike Laughton called Pratt "a pretty tough customer. He always stood up and was accounted for. He was carefree off the ice but all business on it." Gary Smith added, "Pratt was a good, stay at home defenseman and a very tough guy."
------------

Danny Lawson, RW



For obvious reasons, it seems that players who spent significant time in both the NHL and the WHA always seem to score a little more in the WHA - 20-40% more, generally. Danny Lawson is a major exception. Lawson's 1.08 career PPG average in the WHA is over 4X higher than his NHL average of 0.26. This is why it's so hard to gauge where to draft the guy.

He's 8th all-time in WHA goals, and not just from compiling, either: He led the league in its inagural season with 61, and was also 3rd and 8th in other seasons. Clearly he had top-level skill, but wasn't given enough of a chance at the NHL level. (he was also just 20-24 in the NHL and played from 25-29 in the WHA)

In the NHL, he doesn't appear to have done anything impressive, although it appears in 1972, after never killing penalties in the NHL, Buffalo made him their top penalty killing forward, as he tied with Don Luce for the team lead with 40 PPGA.

What made him good? How'd he score these goals? Well, a 1974 WHA correspondents' poll in The World Almanac Guide to Pro Hockey rates him as the league's fastest skater with 18 points, ahead of Bobby Hull and Gordie Howe, who tied for 2nd with 9 apiece. He does not show up in any other categories regarding his stickhandling, shot, or anything else.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1974
Those who watched NHL practices for years thought Danny Lawson would develop into a star, and he finally did... a superb skater, he ranks with Yvan Cournoyer in his ability to accelerate.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1975
"A cannon shot follows a burst of speed as the right winger crosses the blueline"... sounds like Lawson... explosive skater... typically, he applauded the playmaking efforts of center Andre Lacroix rather than his own expertise... without Lacroix, he proved his big year in goals was no fluke... used primarily as a third-line checker by NHL clubs before rising to prominence...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1976
A premier right winger, known for his burst of speed and hard shot... loves to victimize "cheating" clubs that have a tendency to be a bit too enthusiastic about their scoring and forget their checking... coach Joe Crozier believes he became a better hockey player this season, paying more attention to checking...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Complete Handbook Of Pro Hockey 1977
Outstanding skater and shooter, has probably the hardest shot off the right wing in the league... a more complete hockey player today, honed as a checker but still a natural scorer... had his most productive season as a playmaker, setting up 51 goals...


Last edited by seventieslord: 12-25-2011 at 02:29 PM.
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12-25-2011, 11:01 AM
  #77
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The Minutemen select rover Jack Armytage, who captained the Winnipeg Victorias from its inception in 1891 to his retirement in 1897, scoring the overtime goal, his second of the match to make it a 3-2 victory, in the first ever Manitoba championship game in 1892 after having also scored two including the winner the game previously, winning 4-3, in what was a Best-of-3 series. Armytage is more famously known for his heroics four years later when the Winnipeg captain scored the Stanley Cup winning goal and assist in a 2-0 Vics win over Montreal in 1896. Bain would assume captaincy after Armytage's retirement in 1897 but it would take half a decade before Winnipeg would win its next two Stanley Cups.



Quote:
An excellent player, a brilliant leader, and best remembered as the man who first organized a hockey club in the City of Winnipeg on November 3, 1890. This forward was captain until his retirement after the 1897 season. One of his greatest games was on February 14, 1896 in a sudden death game for the Stanley Cup when Jack Armytage scored the winning goal in 2-0 victory over Montreal; the first time the Cup came West.
http://www.mbhockeyhalloffame.ca/hon...tegory=9&id=41

In 1891 the Vics versus Pegs rivalry in the city of Winnipeg was the scene of Armytage's emergence as a leader:
Quote:
Terrible ice conditions immediately hindered the finesse players of both clubs. A rougher brand of hockey was taken up in combination with a very careful passing game. This roughness became particularly apparent mid-way through the first half, when Armytage was involved in a nasty collision with Beckett. Army was badly cut and lost two teeth. He requested and was granted a short intermission, and returned to the ice surface seven minutes later, bandaged and ready to continue. At the half, neither team was able to establish a lead, nor concede one.

The Vics were unable to generate solid team play in the second. The ice worsened and the faster Vics had trouble moving the puck smoothly. Pinned in their own end, they conceded two goals, almost in succession. At the final whistle, the Pegs had taken it 2-0.

Although the Vics had lost, it was clear they had made the correct decision in awarding Jack Armytage the captaincy. Army would have a dramatic impact on the rest of the season, and on the whole history of the franchise.
http://winnipegvics.wordpress.com/

Winnipeg Victorias won Manitoba's first ever championship in 1892:
Quote:
The fans were treated to a great finish, as Armytage again demonstrated his heroics, pulling the Vics ahead out of a 3-3 tie before the final whistle.

This set up the final and decisive match between the clubs on March 12th, 1892. Originally scheduled for the previous week, the game was postponed due to soft weather and poor ice conditions. The extra wait was well worth it for the spectators who packed the Thistle for the match.

Even early on, fighting in hockey was seen as a disgraceful and desperate act. Early commentators suggested that too much fighting would ruin the game, and that sportsmanship and respect for officials were qualities that made a player great. It was so for this final match of the 1891-92 season, that was said to be “for blood”.

The first half was played with increasing intensity, culminating in a scuffle at the half that found Jack Armitage on his back on the ice. Goals were scored by Girdlestone for the Pegs, and McCullogh and Armytage for the Vics. Early in the second half, the score was evened at two by Dennison on some pretty passing by Fred Ashe.

The score remained unchanged until the final whistle. As this was a deciding contest, the teams were given a 5 minute intermission, then returned to the ice for a game of “next goal wins”. After some early overtime heroics by the Pegs keeper Tart Stowe, the captain Armytage put one past him, thus ending a scrappy championship match, to say the least.

And so the Winnipeg Victorias win the cup, donated by T.W. Anderson, and the glory of Manitoba’s first hockey championship.
http://winnipegvics.wordpress.com


Not only did Armytage score the stunning first goal, but he also assisted splendidly on the second goal of the 2-0 Stanley Cup triumph in 1896:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manitoba Free Press, Febuary 15, 1896
The Montreal men appeared on the ice at 8.45 and were given a cordial reception. A few minutes later Armytage appeared on the scene with his trustworthy warriors in the rear... Flett, by his wonderful lifts made the spectators open their mouths in amazement; a particularly fine one was taken advantage of by the forwards, who followed up closely, Howard got the puck in the corner, passed in front of the posts, and Armytage placed fairly between the posts. Time 10 minutes. The Winnipeg yell went up from a dozen different portions of the rink, where little knots of westerners had secured places of vantage.

Early in the second game , Bain was sent to the wall for playing off-side. The "Pegs" were thrown on the defensive for a while, and Shirley Davidson's rushes looked dangerous at time. Every man on the "Peg" forward line was working like a Trojan. Armytage made one of his old time rushes up the side, evading the Montreal defence men, and a decidedly lively scrimmage took place around the Montreal goal. Campbell managed to entice the disc past the Montreal goal keeper, and there was jubiliation again in the ranks of the Winnipeg contingent. They surmised rightly that the victory was already theirs.

Jack Armytage was captain of the Vics. The forward was among the fittest of players resulting in him being a great second half player. In the first challenge, his rushes were so impressive that even the Montreal fans cheered him. The 25 year old Fergus, Ontario native also acted as the team's coach.
http://www.habseyesontheprize.com/20...-winnipeg.html

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12-25-2011, 11:02 AM
  #78
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The Minutemen select center Jiri Novak, who was the longtime pivot of the Martinec and B. Stastny line, through six world championships between 1973-1979, including two golds at the height of Czechoslovakian hockey, representing his country in the 1976 Canada Cup as well as both 1976 and 1980 Olympics. He scored 76 goals in 160 matches on the national team. Back home he had scored 255 goals and won three league championships.



Quote:
A very constructive player with great technique who delivered crisp passes on the blade. Also a very strong two-way player.
http://www.azhockey.com/No.htm

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12-25-2011, 11:03 AM
  #79
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The Minutemen select Gary Doak, the four-time Stanley Cup finalist defensive defenseman of some great teams in the seventies. He was on the cup-winning Bruins team of 1970 but injuries kept him out of half the playoff games that postseason. He would have a greater role to play in subsequent Finals runs in New York in 1972, where he easily led the Rangers in playoff PIMs with 46, and in back-to-back Finals runs in Boston again in 1977 and 1978. The most he ever scored in a season was 17 points twice, but given he was a defensive zone specialist what's significant is his career plus-minus of +140. He was a hard-working, self-sacrificing warrior who blocked shots and checked hard for over a decade.



Quote:
Plenty of ice time coupled with fewer injuries allowed him to excel as a textbook, stay-at-home blueliner who tattooed impressions of his shoulders and elbows onto any opponents who came within range.
http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=12469

Quote:
... he was one of the most rambunctious player of his time. Gary was absolutely fearless and never hesitated to dive to block shots, something he did frequently. His style of play caused him to miss many games due to injuries.

Gary was always a hard worker off the ice and he took that attitude with him to the rink.

Harry Sinden who was a coach back then was full of praise for Doak:

"He doesn't rush like Orr, but defensively he takes a back seat to nobody on our squad," Sinden said.

A typical Gary Doak scenario was during the 1977-78 season when he suffered three broken cheekbones near his left eye and 13 stitches in his head after having been belted head first into the boards by Detroit's Dennis Hextall. In only his second game back after that injury he dove head first into a Bill Barber shot on an open net and saved a virtually certain Flyers goal. Gary never let up. Both his teammates as well as his home fans loved his never say die attitude. His teammate Gerry Cheevers summed it up like this:

"Gary was the kind of player who never let up. He was always putting out 100 % whether he took a guy into the boards or blocking a shot. He had that rambunctious style of play that kept him going even if he was risking injury."

Harry Sinden added:

"As much as any player Gary exemplified the attitude surrounding Bruins teams in the 1970's."

As a Bruin player back then, that was the best compliment you could get. Gary's strength wasn't his offensive talents but his strong work ethic and sacrificing play and he would have been a perfect role model to some of the lazy and money hungry players in todays game.
http://bruinslegends.blogspot.com/20...gary-doak.html

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12-25-2011, 11:15 AM
  #80
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D Fedor Tyutin



D Michel Petit




LW/RW Andrei Lomakin


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12-25-2011, 11:18 AM
  #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Dangit, I just can't stop drafting defensemen. Too many of them stand out for me right now.

Francois Beauchemin, D: #3 D-man on the cup-winning Ducks (players who have done this are rarer than hen's teeth right now), and has been a huge penalty killer in his career: 55% for teams 10% worse than the league average. His NHL coaches, Randy Carlyle and Ron Wilson, have put him on the ice for massive minutes. 443 games into his career, he is averaging 24:41 per game. He has done this for teams that have been, on average, slightly above average.
.
Don't you mean the #1 D-man on the Ducks? He played a few more seconds than Niedermayer or Pronger in the playoffs. So that makes him their #1, right?

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12-25-2011, 11:30 AM
  #82
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LW Chris Kunitz

x4 20goals
x1 Top 10 Shooting % (9th in '11)
Gritty two-time cup winner makes a perfect glue guy for the top six

D Frantisek Kaberle

x1 40 points
13 points in 25 games during Cup win
Cup-winning PPQB will play on my second pair

C Dwight Foster

Two-way center received Selke votes two different years and will play on my fourth line and PK.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LoH
Dwight Foster was a solid two-way centre who could be effective on both specialty teams. He was equally adept at scoring goals, setting up his teammates and winning faceoffs.

Foster remained with the team when it relocated to New Jersey in 1982-83. Early in the season he was traded to the Detroit Red Wings for cash. He was a solid all round player in Motown for parts of four seasons. In 1983-84 his strong defensive play helped the Red Wings make the playoffs for the first time in six years. Foster was traded to Boston in March 1986 and played the 1986-87 season there before retiring.


Last edited by Rob Scuderi: 12-30-2011 at 12:21 AM.
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12-25-2011, 11:38 AM
  #83
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
Dangit, I just can't stop drafting defensemen. Too many of them stand out for me right now.

Francois Beauchemin, D: #3 D-man on the cup-winning Ducks (players who have done this are rarer than hen's teeth right now), and has been a huge penalty killer in his career: 55% for teams 10% worse than the league average. His NHL coaches, Randy Carlyle and Ron Wilson, have put him on the ice for massive minutes. 443 games into his career, he is averaging 24:41 per game. He has done this for teams that have been, on average, slightly above average.

Among all post-lockout defensemen, Beauchemin is 13th in minutes per game. He is a minute ahead of the next available guy (19th) and two minutes ahead of the next (31st), and these other guys both racked up their minutes for bad teams, unlike Francois. .
Your obsession with numbers has failed you now. Beauchemin was good during playoff he was solid enough to play within Ducks system but really he's incredibly average compared to Kaberle and Doak for example.

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12-25-2011, 11:50 AM
  #84
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Montreal select: Marc-Edouard Vlasic D

Averaged over 22 minutes per game in the regular season and in the playoffs , is a skilled defenseman pretty much always top 3 with a ''powerhouse''.

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12-25-2011, 11:57 AM
  #85
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Montreal select Matt Carle D

40 pts seasons ( 2 )
30 pts seasons ( 3 )

Averaged over 20 minutes per game in the regular season and over 25 minutes in the flyers run , he also finished +30 a year.

Already played 73 playoff games , recolting 29 pts .

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12-25-2011, 12:01 PM
  #86
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Mark Pavelich C

70 pts seasons ( 3 )
80 pts season ( 1 )
30 goals seasons ( 2 )
329 pts in 355 games
24 pts in 23 playoff games

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12-25-2011, 12:32 PM
  #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hobnobs View Post
Your obsession with numbers has failed you now. Beauchemin was good during playoff he was solid enough to play within Ducks system but really he's incredibly average compared to Kaberle and Doak for example.
I think Beauchemin is a fine pick now. (As is Kaberle, don't know enough about Doak). I was just goodnaturely ribbing 70s about his "obsession with numbers" so to speak.

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12-25-2011, 12:47 PM
  #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
I think Beauchemin is a fine pick now. (As is Kaberle, don't know enough about Doak). I was just goodnaturely ribbing 70s about his "obsession with numbers" so to speak.
what does ribbing means?

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12-25-2011, 12:51 PM
  #89
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Armytage was a great pick. And I think Jiri was the Novak VI meant to draft in the AA instead of Eduard

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12-25-2011, 12:54 PM
  #90
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Yeah Kaberle and Beauchemin are going to be playing opposite roles for our teams I'd imagine so it's not really apples to apples. Maybe it's my bias against offensive-defenders but I'd rather have Beauch out there during ES minutes. I'm not too worried though cause I can just throw Frank with a DFD who needs help with the transition game and he'll be fine.

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12-25-2011, 01:00 PM
  #91
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Quebec selects:

C Ab DeMarco



- 9th in Goals 1945
- 9th in Goals 1946
- 4th in Assists 1946
- 7th in Assists 1945
- 5th in Points 1945
- 7th in Points 1946

Legends of Hockey
Quote:
hrough Baltimore, where in 1937-38, he played in 56 games with the Baltimore Orioles of the Eastern Hockey League, scoring 25 goals and 27 assists for 52 points.

After playing most of the 1938-39 season with the Providence Reds of the IAHL, DeMarco received the call-up to the Chicago Blackhawks where he played two games.

In 1939-40, DeMarco played in 18 games with the Blackhawks, picking up five assists. He had a four-game stint with the Toronto Maple Leafs in 1942-43. Later that year he played in three games with the Boston Bruins. He played in three more games with the Bruins the following year before moving on to the New York Rangers where he played out the balance of his NHL career. His best year was 1944-45 when he had 24 goals and 30 assists for 54 points in 50 games.

DeMarco went on to play professional hockey until 1952 in the American Hockey, and won a scoring title with Buffalo (37g 76a 113pts.) in the 1950-51 season, scoring 37 goals and 76 assists for 113 points. DeMarco was the father of one time Bruins forward, Ab DeMarco Jr.
RW Simon Nolet



1974 Stanley Cup Champion
Played in 1972 and 1975 All-Star Game
Captain of Kansas City/Colorado 1974-1977

Flyers Legends:
Quote:
It took him a while, but Simon Nolet eventually established himself as a real nice NHL hockey player.

The diminutive right winger known for his excellent slap shot saw little interest from NHL teams in the remaining days of the Original Six league. He never played the game at a true competitive or developmental level until the age of 19 when he first tried to make the Quebec Citadelles' junior team . The following year he made the team and was a big part of the team's success.

After graduating from the junior ranks in 1962 Nolet played senior hockey until 1965, first with the Windsor Maple Leafs in the Nova Scotia Senior Hockey League, and later with the Sherbrooke Castors of the Quebec Senior Circuit. Despite standing just 5'9" tall, he was a dominating player in those senior leagues, posting mind boggling statistics. He had 152 goals in 149 games


When the NHL finally expanded in 1967, Nolet got his long awaited shot at the big leagues. The Philadelphia Flyers purchased the entire Quebec Aces team with the intent of using them as a farm team. Along with the team went the players including Nolet.

While he put up some great numbers in the AHL (averaging well over a point a game including a league leading 96 points in 1967-68), Simon only got brief looks with the Flyers, but did not stick with the club until 1970 when he scored a team high 22 goals in just 56 contests. He was also a strong +13.

Nolet took a step back in 1970-71, scoring just 9 times but continued to be a hard working forward. Though he would reach the 20 goal level only once more, Nolet would remain with the Flyers through to their first Stanley Cup championship in 1974.

Expansion again played a role in Nolet's career soon after the Cup victory. The new comer Kansas City Scouts made Nolet the first skater taken (goaltenders had a separate draft that occurred before the players draft). even though by now he was 33 years old the Scouts felt Nolet could be a top player for them.

"He'll be our goal scorer, " predicted general manager Sid Abel of Nolet, who scored 19 times in limited ice time the year before with Philly. "Simon will see a lot more ice time with us than he ever did in Philly so we see him as a guy who could get 30 or 40 goals."

Nolet didn't get quite that many, but nonetheless didn't disappoint by scoring a career high 26 lamplighters to go with 32 helpers for 58 points.

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12-25-2011, 01:03 PM
  #92
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Originally Posted by Bring Back Scuderi View Post
Yeah Kaberle and Beauchemin are going to be playing opposite roles for our teams I'd imagine so it's not really apples to apples. Maybe it's my bias against offensive-defenders but I'd rather have Beauch out there during ES minutes. I'm not too worried though cause I can just throw Frank with a DFD who needs help with the transition game and he'll be fine.
I would definitely rather have Beauch out there at even strength. Still, you have to think that it's pretty tough to get a competent PP QB at this point, so Kaberle might be more valuable.

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Originally Posted by BenchBrawl View Post
what does ribbing means?
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=ribbing

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12-25-2011, 01:13 PM
  #93
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don't be a smart ass , I did but since ribbing had a lot of definition I didn't understand what it meant exactly in the context you've said it.

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12-25-2011, 01:15 PM
  #94
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don't be a smart ass , I did but since ribbing had a lot of definition I didn't understand what it meant exactly in the context you've said it.
Just ribbing you there, sorry, happy holidays

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12-25-2011, 02:25 PM
  #95
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Just ribbing you there, sorry, happy holidays
Wait, what does ribbing mean?

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12-25-2011, 02:33 PM
  #96
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Didn't you click his link? It's a knitting technique.

Have you canucks really never heard of ribbing haha? I swear you're just joshing with us at this point.

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Old
12-25-2011, 02:41 PM
  #97
chaosrevolver
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The Bursa Janissaries are going to select three Russians with our next day of picks..bios still to come but I'll list the pick for now.

The two wingers of Alexander Uvarov's line, who had great chemistry with each other..

LW: Valentin Kuzin and RW: Yuri Krylov

Finally..I'll also take a defenseman..D: Dmitri Ukolov

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Old
12-25-2011, 02:44 PM
  #98
seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seventieslord View Post
for comparison's sake:

Don Gallinger's best 5 percentage seasons:

77, 52, 47, 42, 18

Murray Armstrong: 84, 55, 52, 50, 43

Somers: 52, 50, 39, 19, 11.

Gallinger, it seems, is more or less just one decent season behind Armstrong (Armstrong's scores are just a teensy bit higher for the top-4 years).

Somers has a top-3 seasons that matches up fairly well with Gallinger and Armstrong's 2nd-4th best, but he lacks that one big season they have.

oh, and Tom Cook: 66, 60, 59, 50, 48. I would say that despite lacking Armstrong's one big season, he almost bridges the gap with his consistency.
Thought I'd throw DeMarco into the mix since he has a similar type of resume and is a fairly one dimensional offensive center like the rest:

90, 60, 33, 27, 12.

He had a season more impressive than anything the above did, but his peak is also far shorter than theirs. he was right on my list after guys like the above, and I think that's about right.

Quote:
Originally Posted by VanIslander View Post
The Minutemen select one of its captains-to-be in 6'1, 195 lbs. all-time great checking left winger Dave Lowry. A playoff hero with a Panthers-leading 10 goals, 17 points in Florida's 1996 Stanley Cup Finals run, Lowry would play in 111 NHL postseason games in all, and score 36 playoff points over his 18-year career. Lowry had five 15+ goal seasons in the NHL. He had been a 60-goal scoring all-star in juniors, but carved out a 1000+ NHL game, 1000+ PIMs career as a hard working checker in a Bottom-6 role. He was captain of the Calgary Flames for two seasons, retiring after a minor role in a Stanley Cup Finals run in 2004 at age 38.




http://www.legendsofhockey.net/Legen...p?player=10969
This is a good pick.

[QUOTE=BillyShoe1721;41457099]D Fedor Tyutin

Quote:
10th in post-lockout minutes per game among available guys. And for pretty good teams.

D Michel Petit
Don't know what the heck to do with this guy, but he is the highest scoring all-time D-man available. He had big minutes for poor teams, poor minutes for good teams. I have a hard time understanding his true worth.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDevilMadeMe View Post
Don't you mean the #1 D-man on the Ducks? He played a few more seconds than Niedermayer or Pronger in the playoffs. So that makes him their #1, right?
mmm hmm... you know I wouldn't actually make such a claim... right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bring Back Scuderi View Post
LW Chris Kunitz

Gritty two-time cup winner makes a perfect glue guy for the top six
was definitely on my radar.

Quote:
C Dwight Foster

Two-way center received Selke votes two different years and will play on my third line and PK
I had no idea who this guy was. Thank you for the discovery.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bring Back Scuderi View Post
Yeah Kaberle and Beauchemin are going to be playing opposite roles for our teams I'd imagine so it's not really apples to apples. Maybe it's my bias against offensive-defenders but I'd rather have Beauch out there during ES minutes. I'm not too worried though cause I can just throw Frank with a DFD who needs help with the transition game and he'll be fine.
It's becoming quite clear to me that my team will end up a lot like my MLD team here, because I have been placing a premium on "overall" resumes and not offense in particular. I have four defensemen, and three I want the most are all pure defensive/physical guys too. Matte is an island right now.

Beauchemin is definitely the better all-time player overall, as has been implied already. His lowest full season icetime is 23:04. Kaberle's highest is 23:20. And Beauch has done it for teams 3% better than average, as opposed to 13% below. Kaberle has a longer NHL resume at this point, though.

They are actually equally efficient offensively, they've just had different usage. Both have identical 21 ESP/80GP stats. And on the PP, Beauchemin has 10 adj. Pts per season with 31% usage, Kaberle has 14 with 45% usage. More or less 50% more points in 50% more time - he just got to do it more often.

Obviously that still makes him a slightly more attractive A level PP QB. (the pickings are really slim here, the best PP guys left are guys I just don't want to touch as far as overall play is concerned!)


Last edited by seventieslord: 12-25-2011 at 03:30 PM.
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Old
12-25-2011, 02:45 PM
  #99
seventieslord
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chaosrevolver View Post
The Bursa Janissaries are going to select three Russians with our next day of picks..bios still to come but I'll list the pick for now.

The two wingers of Alexander Uvarov's line, who had great chemistry with each other..

LW: Valentin Kuzin and RW: Yuri Krylov

Finally..I'll also take a defenseman..D: Dmitri Ukolov
all three high on my list. Krylov is also a D, he was my #1 spare candidate.

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Old
12-25-2011, 04:41 PM
  #100
Hedberg
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Quebec selects D Vladimir Brezhnev

17 Goals in 57 International Games
45 Goals in 350 Soviet League Games
Member of the Soviet Hockey Hall of Fame

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